Food & Health Archive


Move Over Squirrels, It’s Acorn Harvesting Time

Wednesday, October 29th, 2014

One thing you can count on this time of year is an abundance of acorns underfoot. Why should the squirrels have all these nutrient rich nuts to themselves?

Acorns are completely edible, according to fermentation expert Sandor Katz, and they have historically been a critical source of nutrition for many native peoples in North America and elsewhere.  In the following excerpt from his book, The Art of Fermentation, Katz encourages readers to tap into this abundant food resource and start experimenting with acorns.

Sorry squirrels.

*****

Acorns, the nuts of oak trees, are edible and in fact have been a critical source of nutrients for many native peoples in North America and elsewhere. In mainstream culture, however, acorns are largely ignored as a food for human consumption. Meanwhile, ironically, the imminent threat of global food shortages is continually being used to justify deforestation and intensifying biotechnology. I’m not saying anyone should subsist on acorns alone, but let’s tap into the abundant food resources we already have rather than acting based upon the myth of overall scarcity.

Acorn Harvesting Tips

Gather acorns in the fall. Reject any with visible worm holes. Air-dry acorns before storing. It is not a problem if acorns have already begun to sprout. California acorn enthusiast Suellen Ocean writes:

I like to gather sprouted acorns because the sprouting increases the acorn’s nutritional value. It is no longer in a “starch” stage, but has changed to a “sugar” stage. The sprouting also helps split them from the shell. It is beneficial because if it has sprouted, it’s a good acorn, and I haven’t wasted time gathering wormy ones. I’ve found that an acorn with a two-inch-long sprout is fine, as long as the acorn nut meat hasn’t turned green. I break off the sprout and continue.

Shell, Grind, and Soak

It is important to note that the acorns of many oak trees contain high levels of tannins and require leaching prior to consumption. To do this, remove acorns from their shells, grind, and soak in water. You can grind acorns dry using a mortar and pestle or mill, or mix acorns with water and grind in a blender or food processor. Acorns should be finely ground to expose lots of surface area, enabling the tannins to leach out.

Acorns can be leached in a fine mesh bag in a running stream (this is the fastest method), or in a series of soaks that can last for a few days. As acorn meal soaks, the meal will settle at the bottom of the vessel and the water will darken. Gently pour off the dark water at least daily and discard. Water will darken less with each soak, as tannin levels decrease. Keep rinsing with fresh water until it no longer darkens. If you wish to ferment acorn meal, leave it to soak a few more days in just a small amount of water after the tannins have been leached.

Acorns can be used to fortify and flavor many different foods. Once I made acorn gnocchi, which were excellent. Julia F. Parker, of the Miwok/Paiute people in California’s Yosemite Valley, wrote a beautiful book about acorn preparation called It Will Live Forever, in which she describes traditional techniques for making a simple porridge (nuppa) using only leached acorn meal and water, which is delicious! And on a website devoted to the language of another California tribe, the Cahto, I came across reference to “fermented acorn/acorn cheese” (ch’int’aan-noo’ool’). I have not found further information on fermented acorn cheese, nor have I experimented, but I include this tidbit in the hope that other acorn-loving fermenters will experiment in this vein.

Capturing Landscape in a Wine: The Unlikely Vineyard

Monday, October 27th, 2014

Is it possible to capture landscape in a bottle? To express its essence of place—geology, geography, climate, and soil—as well as the skill of the winegrower?

That’s what Deirdre Heekin and her chef/husband, Caleb Barber, set out to accomplish on their tiny, eight-acre hillside farm and vineyard in Vermont.

Our farming came from wanting to grow particular vegetables for our restaurant kitchen. Once we started going with the restaurant garden and farm, I also became interested in the process of making wine. I was doing a lot of work representing organic and biodynamic wine growers on our wine list. Intellectually, I knew the whole process of making wine, but I had never done it on my own. I wanted to do that, just for my own edification,” Heekin told Modern Farmer in a recent interview. “In the second year we went to go visit another Vermont vineyard that was making some really lovely wine and it dawned on us. We have a fantastic south facing slope that would be perfect for a vineyard, there are some great people doing it in Vermont — let’s just do it. We left that particular winery with 180 plants that day. We planted that summer. It has been full tilt growing as we go along. We are now in our fifth vintage.”

AnUnlikelyVineyardChallenged by cold winters, wet summers, and other factors, Heekin and her husband set about to grow not only a vineyard, but an orchard of heirloom apples, pears, and plums, as well as gardens filled with vegetables, herbs, roses, and wildflowers destined for their own table and for the kitchen of their small restaurant—Osteria Pane e Salute, a restaurant in Woodstock, Vermont.

But An Unlikely Vineyard involves much more. It also presents, through the example of their farming journey and winegrowing endeavors, an impressive amount of information on how to think about almost every aspect of gardening: from composting to trellising; from cider and perry making to growing old garden roses, keeping bees, and raising livestock; from pruning (or not) to dealing naturally with pests and diseases.

Accompanied throughout by lush photos (Heekin is also an avid Instragrammer), this gentle narrative will appeal to anyone who loves food, farms, and living well.

An Unlikely Vineyard: The Education of a Farmer and Her Quest for Terroir by Deirdre Heekin is now available.

Hot off the Press: New Fall Books!

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014

What better way to ease the transition from summer fun to the fall months than exploring all our exciting new books.

Whether you are looking for the ultimate mushroom guide; take the next leap in permaculture; get everything out of those weeds in your backyard; improve your digestive health or  just curl up with a  memoir — you’ll find that and much more!

For thirty years, Chelsea Green has published books that you will turn to again and again. We don’t cater to fads or trends, but focus on being a resource for a timeless and holistic approach.

Let our new fall releases inspire you with ideas and practical skills!

Happy reading from your friends at Chelsea Green Publishing.

 

Farming the Woods The Heal Your Gut Cookbook Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation
The Wild Wisdom of Weeds Defending Beef Integrated Forest Gardening

Save 35% on our New Crop of Fall Books

An Unlikely Vineyard Angels by the River Slowspoke The ALL NEW Don't Think of an Elephant
Carbon Shock In the Company of Bears Around the World in 80 Plants The Vegan Book of Permaculture

Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books already on sale for example. Free shipping for orders $100 or more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only). International orders can be placed by phone (802-295-6300) or email.


Defending Beef: The Case for Sustainable Meat

Thursday, October 16th, 2014

While no single book can definitively answer the thorny question of how to feed the Earth’s growing population, Defending Beef makes the case that, whatever the world’s future food system looks like, cattle and beef can and must be part of the solution.

In Defending Beef, Nicolette Hahn Niman — a longtime vegetarian — argues that cattle are neither inherently bad for the Earth nor is meat bad for our own nutritional health. In fact, properly managed livestock play an essential role in maintaining grassland ecosystems by functioning as surrogates for herds of wild ruminants that once covered the globe.

Hahn Niman, a former environmental attorney and activist, dispels popular myths about how eating beef is bad for our bodies. She methodically evaluates health claims made against beef, demonstrating that such claims have proven false.  Grounded in empirical scientific data and with living examples from around the world the author shows how foods from cattle – milk and meat, particularly when raised entirely on grass – are healthful, extremely nutritious, and an irreplaceable part of the world’s food system.

She also criticizes the modern, industrial food system — especially as it pertains to meat production — for being harmful to animals, the environment, and our health. Here’s a short excerpt from the book’s final analysis:

“I will be the first to agree that industrial methods for raising farm animals are indefensible, and I believe all people should join in rejecting them. Having seen it in all its gory details, I have no qualms about calling industrialized animal production a routinized form of animal torture. While Prohibitionists attacking innocent apple trees with axes seem absurd to us today, a lot of discussion over the ethics of meat eating likewise focuses on the wrong villain. Industrial animal production is rightly vilified; animal farming, on the other hand, is not.

What has really fostered my interest in the debate over meat eating is not a desire to encourage meat consumption but a longing for some nuance in the discussion. The issue is far from black-and-white, and polarized camps lobbing accusations at each other only hinder movement toward a better system. Building a food system that is more ecological and more humane is far more important to me than whether or not so-and-so is eating meat.

I believe the real issue is whether we humans are living up to our responsibilities of good stewardship of animals and the earth. Michael Pollan and others have proposed the idea that animals “chose” domestication based on a sort of “bargain” with humanity.  (…) However, it’s reasonable to assume, as well, that animals would never have opted for such an arrangement if torture had been part of the deal. Stated simply: By raising animals in factory farms, humans are violating their age-old contract with domesticated animals.

(…)

Individuals and groups are rightly concerned about adequate food supplies for the future. But they would do well to focus their attention on this imminent crisis, and on the way livestock are managed on the land, rather than on the absolute number of livestock, which has little significance. Properly managed grazing animals are an important part of the solution to feeding the world in the future.”

 For more from Defending Beef, click here to read the Preface and Introduction.

Wise Traditions Conference: Focus on Food and Health

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014

Interested in exploring the wisdom of the ages and the best of modern science and learning how it pertains to your family’s food and overall health?

Our friends at the Weston A. Price Foundation are hosting their annual conference next month in Indianapolis, Indiana and there’s still time to register and check out several days of information on nutritional health, whole foods, and farming traditions geared toward improving your overall health and well-being.

Chelsea Green author Mike Farrell — author of The Sugarmaker’s Companionwill lead a workshop on tapping trees, sap, and syrup production. Farrell will teach you about the costs and benefits of developing a sugaring operation on a hobby or commercial basis, as well as different trees that can be tapped—including various species of maple, birch, and walnut.  The benefits of using tree sap and syrup as a local, sustainable, and healthy sweetener will also be discussed in detail.

Authors Hilary Boynton and Mary Brackett will be at the conference and able to sign copies of their popular new book, The Heal Your Gut Cookbook: Nutrient-Dense Recipes for Intestinal Health Using the GAPS Diet. However, Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, who developed the GAPS Diet and wrote the Foreword to Boynton and Brackett’s book, is a featured speaker at the conference.

Chelsea Green will have an onsite bookstore at the event where you can find a selection of our books that focus on traditional food, health, and cooking, meet some of our authors and maybe get a book signed. Be sure to stop by and say hello.

 

The Heal Your Gut Cookbook
by Hilary Boynton and Mary G. Brackett
In The Heal Your Gut Cookbook, readers will learn about the key cooking techniques and ingredients that form the backbone of the GAPS Diet: working with stocks and broths, soaking nuts and seeds, using coconut, and culturing raw dairy. The authors offer encouraging, real-life perspectives on the life-changing improvements to the health of their families by following this challenging, but powerful, diet. With more than 200 straightforward, family-friendly, nutrient-dense recipes, this book is a must-have if you are considering the GAPS Diet, or simply looking to improve your digestive health and—by extension—your physical and mental well-being.

The Sugarmaker’s Companion
by Michael Farrell
In The Sugarmaker’s Companion, author Michael Farrell documents the untapped potential of American forests and shows how sugaring can turn a substantial profit for farmers while providing tremendous enjoyment and satisfaction. Appealing to foresters, organic farmers with woodlands, homesteaders, preppers, permaculture enthusiasts, and, of course, sugarmakers, this book is applicable to a wide range of climates and regions, and is sure to change the conversation around syrup production and prove invaluable for both home-scale and commercial sugarmakers alike. This is a unique guide to making an integrated sugaring operation, interconnected to the whole-farm system, woodland, and community.

How Do You Like Them Apples?

Tuesday, October 14th, 2014

Crisp air? Check. Vibrant foliage? Double check.

It’s Autumn and that means orchards are overflowing with apples. As we tuck in to our first warm apple pie of the season, we thought it would be a good time to reflect on this quintessential staple of the American diet—the apple.

In the age of industrial food production, how much do we really know about apples? Here to shed some light on the subject is a selection of Chelsea Green books and authors that embrace the biodiversity of this fruit and all of its forms. From crafting the perfect cider to utilizing traditional preservation techniques to a history lesson covering 1,800 varieties, these books will take you on a journey deep into the world of apples.

Books About Apples

The New Cider Maker’s Handbook
by Claude Jolicoeur
If cider is the new craft beer, what’s holding you back from brewing your own? The New Cider Maker’s Handbook by Claude Jolicoeur is a one-of-a-kind guide to cider production, providing detailed and accessible instructions on the basics of cider making. Check out this excerpt on the many types of ciders that are within your reach.

Old Southern Apples
by Lee Calhoun
Explore the vast and forgotten world of southern apples with this ultimate guide by pomological expert and conservationist Lee Calhoun, including over 1,800 southern apple varieties and 120 color images. Here’s the full introduction to Old Southern Apples.
Taste, Memory
by David Buchanan
Buchanan’s memoir examines the relationship between preserving culturally forgotten foods and looking ahead to new varieties. Drawing from his experience as a grower of heirloom cider apple trees and more, Taste, Memory is based on the fundamental principle that a biologically diverse planet is not only good for the environment, but for humans as well. Here’s an interview with Buchanan on why we need biodiversity.
Preserving Food Without Freezing or Canning
by Gardeners & Farmers of Terre Vivante
Not sure how to preserve this season’s bounty? This essential guide to traditional preservation techniques provides numerous recipes that enhance the taste and flavor of food, all while preserving its nutritional value. The book offers multiple options and recipes for storing apples, whether it’s simply utilizing a cellar or making a delicious chutney. Or, try making a drying tray in order to naturally preserve and increase the sugar content of your apples without additives.
The Grafter’s Handbook
by R.J. Garner
It’s never too soon to begin planning for next growing season and The Grafter’s Handbook by R.J. Garner has everything any level horticulturalist needs to know about grafting. This essential reference provides five grafting techniques for fruit trees, all of which will ensure that your orchard can thrive!

Chelsea Green Celebrates 30 Years of Craft and Cutting Edge Books

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

We here at Chelsea Green have always had a nose for authors and books that are years ahead of the cultural curve. That knack is clearly on display in a new anthology that we’re making available to celebrate our first thirty years in publishing.

More than one hundred books are represented in this collection and reflect the many distinct areas in which we have published—from literature and memoirs to progressive politics, to highly practical books on green building, organic gardening and farming, food and health, and related subjects—all of which reflect our underlying philosophy: “The politics and practice of sustainable living.”

The Chelsea Green Reader offers a glimpse into our wide-ranging list of books and authors and to the important ideas that they express. Interesting and worth reading in their own right, the individual passages when taken as a whole trace the evolution of a highly successful small publisher—something that is almost an oxymoron in these days of corporate buyouts and multinational book groups.

“I like to think of these brief excerpts as individual stones in a cairn. A cairn is a landmark, a pile of rocks built by hikers high above tree line in the mountains. It grows larger and larger over the years as new hikers passing by contribute a new stone, or replace one that might have fallen. A cairn is there to confirm, even on a foggy day, that we are on the right path, and it indicates the way forward, to the summit,” writes Senior Editor Ben Watson in the book’s preface.

“Every book is a stone, or a brick in the wall, of an edifice that is always being constructed, constantly evolving, and never quite finished. Perhaps it’s no coincidence that a publishing company is colloquially referred to as a ‘house,’” Watson adds. “At Chelsea Green we continue to build, with our authors and their ideas, a great house, one that represents our deeply held values and beliefs, our hopes and our dreams.”CGP_grasshopper_olive green

From the beginning, Chelsea Green’s books were nationally recognized, garnering positive reviews, accolades, and awards. We’ve published four New York Times bestsellers, and our books have set the standard for in-depth, how-to books that remain relevant years—often decades—beyond their original publication date. Books in this volume range from ones that appeared in our very first catalog in 1985 (and remain in print today) to ones that have long since gone out of print, but not forgotten as important touchstones for us as a publisher.

“Chelsea Green was born from a single seed: the beauty of craft. Craft in writing and editing, in a story well told, or a thesis superbly expressed,” writes cofounder and publisher emeritus Ian Baldwin in the book’s Foreword.

This attention to craft has even informed our business model: In 2012, Chelsea Green became an employee-owned company as a way to “practice what we publish” and lay the groundwork to ensure that the founders’ legacy remained intact in the decades to follow.

The move made Chelsea Green unique among book publishers in an industry dominated by investor-driven, multinational corporations. Only a handful of independent book publishers can claim employee-ownership status, and of those Chelsea Green will be near the top in terms of the percentage controlled by employees.

With the rise of the Internet, new media platforms, and a constantly shifting bookselling landscape, the future of publishing is anything but predictable. But if Chelsea Green’s books prove anything, it is that, despite these challenges, there remains a hunger for new and important ideas and authors, and for the permanence and craftsmanship of the printed word. Today our ongoing mission is stronger than ever, as we launch into our next thirty years of publishing excellence.

“People are moved by what they read,” adds Baldwin in his Foreword. “That pertains whether they read an ebook or a printed one, and they want to connect with the writers who make their lives richer. Part of the publisher’s role is to help make this vitalizing connection. This nexus among author, publisher, and reader is, I believe, unlikely to wither anytime soon.”

The Best of Autumn Project Special

Wednesday, October 8th, 2014

There is no denying it: the days are shorter and unless you planned for season extension your garden is all about the root vegetables.

But don’t let the looming winter get you down. There are plenty of projects and recipes perfect for the changing weather.

Let our field guide to our favorite fall projects inspire you: from growing endless arugula, the ultimate sheet mulch, creating a root cellar, growing mushrooms on your jeans (no joke), cider making, and more!

Happy reading from your friends at Chelsea Green Publishing.

P.S. Don’t let the permaculture sale pass you by! http://goo.gl/hgMI7g

 


The Endless Arugula
 The Endless Arugula Bed

Want to save time and money while enjoying your greens as soon as possible in the spring? Consider extending your growing season by overwintering your crops—it’s both frugal and forward thinking. Grow it »»

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Ultimate Bombproof Sheet Mulch

Ultimate Bombproof Sheet Mulch

A fresh bed of sheet mulch isn’t as productive as one that’s six months old, so fall is the perfect time of year to start a new layer of mulch for your spring plantings. Get a jump start on your spring planting and turn soil into black gold.  Build it »»

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Chop, Salt, Pack, Wait

Chop, Salt, Pack, Wait: Four Simple Steps to Making the Best Sauerkraut on Earth

Four easy steps are all you need to turn veggies into a long-lasting, tangy condiment perfect to serve alongside sausage or eggs.

So go ahead, make friends with the microbes in your life. Make it »»

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Winter Vegetable Magic: Creating a Root Cellar

Winter Vegetable Magic: Creating a Root Cellar

As we enter into autumn, the gardening locavore starts assessing her stock of pickled beans, dried herbs, and preserved fruits. But what about the potatoes, beets, turnips, carrots? What’s a gardener to do with those when the thermometer drops? Build it »»

 

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Oyster Mushrooms: Grow Mushrooms on Your Jeans

Oyster Mushrooms: Grow Mushrooms on Your Jeans.

Thinking about getting rid of that pair of worn out jeans? Think again. You could use them to grow mushrooms. That’s right, mushrooms.

Don’t have a lot of space? Not a problem. Oyster mushrooms are perfect for fruiting indoors and in small spaces.  Grow it »»

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Veggie Lovers Rejoice: Vegetable Tian

Veggie Lovers Rejoice: Vegetable Tian

Enjoy This simple but elegant dish from the newly released The Heal Your Gut Cookbook. It’s always beautiful, and the vegetables are completely interchangeable, so use what have.  Eat it »»

 
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Autumn Apples: The Basics of Cider Making

Autumn Apples: The Basics of Cider Making

An increasingly popular, and mouth-watering, approach to handling the overflow of orchard-fresh apples is to make a batch—or five—of hard cider.

Ever wonder how you can dive in and make your very own? With these basics we’ll get you started. Learn it »»

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Sweet Desserts: Cinnamon Spiral
Sweet Desserts: Cinnamon Spiral

Warm up your kitchen this winter with this sweet temptation. This isn’t just any bread – the crumb is firm and reminiscent of pound cake, while the crust is soft.

Cinnamon Spiral is comfort food with style. Bake it »»

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 ~ ~ Hot off The Press for Fall: New Releases ~ ~

The Wild Wisdom of Weeds
Retail $29.95
Sale: $19.47

Farming the Woods
Retail $39.95
Sale: $25.97
The Heal Your Gut Cookbook
Retail $29.95
Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation
Retail $39.95
Sale: $25.97
~ ~ Need More? Don’t forget to look at our Sale books  ~ ~
Resilient Farm and Homestead
Retail $40.00
Sale: $26.00
Grass, Soil, Hope
Retail $19.95
Sale: $12.97
Integrated Forest Gardening
Retail $45.00
Sale: $29.95
Edible Perennial Gardening
Retail $22.95
Sale: $14.92
For a full list of all our sale books – more than 30 for 20% off or more—take a look at the full list here.

Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books
already on sale for example. Free shipping for orders $100 or
more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only)
 

The 13 Weeds Essential for Human Survival

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014

Did you know there are 13 plants you can find, whether at home or traveling, that can help you maintain a state of optimal health with minimal cost and effort?

In The Wild Wisdom of Weeds, author Katrina Blair introduces these 13 global “survival plants”—dandelion, mallow, purslane, plantain, thistle, amaranth, dock, mustard, grass, chickweed, clover, lambsquarter, and knotweed—that both regenerate the earth and support human survival. They grow everywhere where people live, from the hottest deserts to the Arctic Circle, and provide important forage for the bees and other wild pollinators especially today as human development is encroaching on wild habitat. They help regenerate the soil and bring fertility back to land that has been disturbed or overgrazed. The wild weeds are exceptionally nutritious as protein rich food sources.  The weeds typically have more nutrition than anything we can buy from the store. These 13 weeds each have powerful medicinal qualities and through utilizing them on a regular basis not only can they help cure illnesses but also prevent them from occurring.  The weeds often grow in abundance so overharvesting is not a concern.  The weeds are generally free and widely available to most humans living on the planet as an important survival resource.

With more than 100 unique recipes, Blair teaches us how to prepare these wild plants from root to seed, including information on growing “wild” microgreens, sprouting, fermenting, making wild green powders, and gleaning weeds from local lawns as a principled stance against pesticide use.

Introducing the 13 Weeds

Purslane (Portulaca) seeds are one of the best sources of omega 3 fatty acids. The leaves and stems are juicy, succulent and taste lemony.

Mallow (Malva) has a pleasant mellow flavor and is delicious in salads and juices while gently drawing out congestion from the body.  The whole plant blended and strained also makes a great base for homemade lotions and shampoos.

Plantain (Plantago) is not only a great food, but also acts as the perfect first aid kit in a myriad of ways.  The leaves chewed into a mash draw out snake venom, spider bites, infection, and assist rapid healing of any injury.

Clover (Trifolium) replenishes the soil with nitrogen and re-mineralizes our bodies with a full spectrum rainbow of trace minerals that support the integrity of long-term health.

Curly dock (Rumex) leaves are used for lettuce when young and the seeds ground fine make great flour for adding to breads.  The root works as a fantastic natural antibiotic and immune builder.

Lambsquarter (Chenopodium) has far greater nutritional value than spinach and its seeds turn into the highly nutritious grain, quinoa.

Amaranth (Amaranthus) also known as pigweed is a wild food of choice.  The greens are delicious raw and for making into green chips and the little black seeds and leaves are packed with protein.

Grass (Poaceae) grows everywhere and is a true blessing because all wild grasses are edible. It makes a fantastic survival food because it contains all 8 essential amino acids making it a complete protein.  Chew the blades for the juice and spit out the pulp if it is too tough to break down.

Chickweed (Stellaria) is a delicate plant with five white flower petals that uses the support of other plants to grow higher.  It tastes mild, like fresh green springtime.  It can be used in salads, green juices, and salves.  It supports our ability to let go of excess and increases our bodies efficiency.

Thistle (Carduus) greens make a fantastic juice.  Harvest the greens carefully from the back stem or use gloves.  Place them in the blender with plenty of water, an apple, and a lemon.  Blend and strain the pulp out.  Drink this delicious thistle lemonade and experience a good energy that comes from shifting your body towards an alkaline healing state.

Knotweed (Polygonom) grows low to the ground and is often overlooked. It is a wild buckwheat that is highly nutritious and delicious. It is a first succession pioneer species and helps regenerate the soil.

Dandelion (Taraxacum) reminds us how to survive in style.  The whole plant is edible and highly beneficial for good living.  The roots are eaten raw or prepared like a wild potato, the greens are delicious with a slightly bitter flavor, the flowers taste like honey, and the stems make great musical flutes.

Wild mustards (Brasica) are spicy edibles and encourage good circulation in the body.  They each have four flower petals that come in different colors of the rainbow.  The greens make a flavorful addition to dishes and the yellow seeds create great condiments and add local variety to your spice rack.

The Wild Wisdom of Weeds is about empowering ourselves to maintain a state of optimal health with minimal cost and effort, and offers a tangible way to connect with our sense of place by incorporating wild edible and medicinal plants into our daily practices.

Save 35% off your purchase of The Wild Wisdom of Weeds when you buy it direct from us before October 13.

Homemade Bone Broth – A Healthy Diet Staple

Thursday, September 25th, 2014

Have you had your steaming hot bowl of bone broth today? If not, you might want to consider integrating this nutrient rich, immune system boosting elixir into your diet.

As the foundation of the GAPS diet, bone broths are used in the early stages to starve pathogenic bacteria in your digestive system and heal your gut. Sealing a leaky gut can help treat disorders ranging from allergies and asthma to autism, ADD, depression, and more. However, as a healthy source of calcium, potassium, and protein, anyone looking to improve their digestive health can reap the nutritional benefits of bone broth.

If you still need convincing, listen to this interview about bone broth conducted by Dr. Joseph Mercola with authors Hilary Boynton and Mary Brackett from The Heal Your Gut Cookbook. After the interview was posted on mercola.com, the book shot to #7 on Amazon’s best seller list for the day.

Learn how to make your own chicken, beef, and fish bone broths using the below recipes from The Heal Your Gut Cookbook. This easy to digest, nourishing broth is made from bones with a small amount of meat on them that you cook on low heat for anywhere from 4-72 hours depending on the type of bones being used. According to Boynton and Brackett, some of the most nutrient-dense animal parts include those you may normally throw away. It might take some getting used to, but once you start adding those chicken feet or fish heads into the pot, your nourished gut will thank you.

For more recipes from books that focus on restorative diets and traditional foods, check out this simple, 4-step method of fermenting vegetables from The Art of Fermentation by Sandor Katz and a recipe for succotash from Full Moon Feast by Jessica Prentice—a cookbook featuring foods that follow the ancient rhythms of the season.

Now, get ready to make bone both a new staple in your diet.

Homemade Bone Broth – The Heal Your Gut Cookbook


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