Food & Health Archive


RECIPE: Summer Cherry Cornmeal Cobbler

Thursday, July 10th, 2014

It’s that time of year again…outdoor barbecues are a weekend staple, trips to the beach or pool are becoming more frequent, and cherries are ripe for the picking!

Take this seasonal cue and enjoy the fresh fruit while you can with this recipe for summer cherry cornmeal cobbler from Cooking Close to Home.

Authors Diane Imrie and Richard Jarmusz believe no matter where you live, you should be able to cook locally throughout the four seasons. Their book, Cooking Close to Home, is a seasonal guide with more than 150 recipes that will inspire you to create delicious and nutritious meals using ingredients produced in your own community.

So visit your local farmers’ market or find a “pick your own” cherry orchard near you and stock up—this sweet homestyle cobbler awaits!

Cooking Close to Home: A Year of Seasonal Recipes is on sale now for 35% off until July 15.

Summer Cherry Cornmeal Cobbler by Chelsea Green Publishing

25% off Essential Books for Homesteaders

Wednesday, July 9th, 2014

In this age of rapid change, how can we best adapt to sustain our food systems and regenerate our land?

Drawing from time-tested holistic techniques our authors show homesteaders, farmers and growers of all sizes how to remain resilient.

Whether you grow veggies and herbs on your balcony, intensively garden a half-acre on your homestead, or make a living off the land, we’ve got a book (or two) for you. Now through July 31st SAVE 25% on books for your homestead or small farm. 

Our books and authors never skim the surface – they think in systems and farm holistically, applying the wisdom of letting nature do the heavy lifting and giving the skills to empower you.

We hope you’re having a busy and abundant growing season!

Happy reading from the folks at Chelsea Green Publishing

P.S. Don’t forget to look at our full list of sale books here: www.chelseagreen.com/bookstore/sale


Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books already on sale for example. Free shipping for orders $100 or more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only). International orders can be placed by phone (802-295-6300) or email.


Homesteading Books: 25% off until July 31st 

The Resilient Farm and Homestead
Retail: $40.00
Sale: $30.00
Keeping a Family Cow
Retail: $19.95
Sale: $14.96
The Resilient Gardener
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $22.46
The New Cider Maker's Handbook
Retail: $44.95
Sale: $33.71
From the Wood-Fired Oven
Retail: $44.95
Sale: $33.71
The Sugarmaker's Companion
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $29.96
The Gourmet Butcher's Guide to Meat
Retail: $49.95
Sale: $37.46
The Small-Scale Dairy
Retail: $34.95
Sale: $26.21
The Small-Scale Poultry Flock
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $29.96
Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking
Retail: $40.00
Sale: $30.00
The New Horse-Powered Farm
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $29.96
The New Organic Grower
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $18.71
The Holistic Orchard
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $29.96
Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $22.46
Market Farming Success, Revised and Expanded Edition
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $22.46
Raising Dough
Retail: $19.95
Sale: $14.96
Farms with a Future
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $22.46
You Can Farm
Retail: $35.00
Sale: $26.25
The Organic Seed Grower
Retail: $49.95
Sale: $37.46
The Grafter's Handbook
Retail: $40.00
Sale: $30.00
The Winter Harvest Handbook
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $22.46
The Organic Grain Grower
Retail: $45.00
Sale: $33.75
Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond Vol. 1
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $22.46
Compact Living
Retail: $14.95
Sale: $11.21
The Moneyless Manifesto
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $18.71
The Log Book
Retail: $12.95
Sale: $9.71
Farm-Fresh and Fast
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $18.71
Seed to Seed
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $18.71
Organic Seed Production and Saving
Retail: $12.95
Sale: $9.71
Breed Your Own Vegetable Varieties
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $22.46
Holistic Orcharding with Michael Phillips
Retail: $49.95
Sale: $37.46
Preserving with Friends
Retail: $34.95
Sale: $26.21
Natural Beekeeping with Ross Conrad
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $18.71
Year-Round Vegetable Production with Eliot Coleman: DVD
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $29.96

~~ Coming Soon: Available for Pre-Order ~~

Integrated Forest Gardening
Retail: $45.00
Sale: $33.75
Farming The Woods
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $29.96
Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $29.95

Stay Connected:

Like what we’re up to?
Don’t forget to join our
online community too.
We’ll keep you posted
with the latest in
sustainable living.

Twitter Image
You Tube Image
Do-it-Yourself Projects

So you want to be a small-scale dairy farmer

So you want to be a small-scale dairy farmer


The Seed Series: Choosing the right seed crop

The Seed Series: Choosing the Right Seed Crop


Build a wood-fired oven in your backyard

Build a wood-fired oven in your backyard


Does it pay to keep a cow?

Does it pay to keep a cow?


Un-Coop your Poop: Everything you need to know about chicken tractors

Un-Coop your Poop: Everything you Need to Know about Chicken Tractors


6 Reasons why you need to plant perennials…like now

6 Reasons Why You Need to Plant Perennials…Like Now


NEED MORE? Take a look at our list of sale books 

Sale Image

For a list of all our sale books – more than 60 on sale for 20% off or more—take a look at the full list here.



Dried Tomato Recipes: Enjoy Your Harvest All Year Long

Monday, July 7th, 2014

As your tomatoes start ripening on the vine this season, think ahead to how you want to preserve your summer harvest and enjoy it all year long.

Here are a few versatile dried tomato recipes that are easy to make and don’t require freezing or canning.

For more recipes using traditional preserving techniques like salt, oil, drying, cold storage, vinegar, and fermentation, read Preserving Food without Freezing or Canning by the Gardeners & Farmers of Terre Vivante.

Tomatoes Dried Naturally

  • Tomatoes
  • Almond oil (or another mild oil)
  • A clean rag
  • Drying apparatus
  • A glass jar

Tomatoes are by far the vegetable most often preserved by drying in various forms.

We prefer to use the ‘Beefsteak’ variety, a pulpy tomato with fewer seeds.

Peel the tomatoes. (If this poses a problem, soak them for a few seconds in boiling water.) Cut them lengthwise (from bottom to top) into slices approximately 1/4-inch thick and remove the seeds. Place the slices on a clean rag to absorb the juice. Oil the dryer screen lightly, preferably with mild almond oil, so that the slices will not stick. When the slices are dry on one side, turn them over; they will be hard when dry. Store the tomatoes well packed in a glass jar.

To use, pour one cup of boiling water over one-half to three-quarter ounces of dried tomatoes per person, and leave them to soften for a few minutes. Add a teaspoon of olive oil, season to your tate, and serve with a purée or a grain dish. We also add these tomatoes to grains or vegetables that are nearly done cooking.

Odile Angeard, Cognin

Stuffed Dried Tomatoes in Oil

  • Tomatoes
  • Parsley
  • Garlic
  • Anchovy fillets (optional)
  • Fresh basil leaves (optional)
  • Oil
  • Drying apparatus
  • A glass jar

I dry my tomatoes in a solar dryer, cut in half and seeded (easily done with a small spoon). When the tomatoes are dry, stuff a little finely chopped parsley and garlic between the two halves. If you like, add an anchovy fillet, or a basil leaf. Place the reassembled tomatoes in a jar and cover with oil. These are delicious added to a salad during winter.

Anonymous

Sun-Dried Tomatoes in Oil

Variation 1:

  • 4 lbs. tomatoes
  • 1 lb. coarse salt
  • Oil
  • Drying apparatus
  • Gauze
  • A clean, dry cloth
  • Glass jars

Choose very ripe, small, oblong tomatoes. The Italian variety “Principe Borghese’ is an excellent drier, as are many smaller plum or “paste” tomatoes.

Cut the tomatoes in half, place them on a tray set in the sun, add salt, and cover with gauze to protect from insects. During the day, turn the tomatoes over twice; at night, bring them inside to protect from moisture.

A few days later, when you see that they are very dry but not totally dehydrated, remove some of the salt with a clean, dry cloth. Put the tomatoes into jars and cover them with approximately three-quarters of an inch of oil over the tomatoes, coming up to three-eights of an inch below the rim. Close the jars tightly and store them in a cool place. In Italy, tomatoes preserved in this manner are eaten as hors d’oeuvres, with no additional preparation.

Marie-Christine Martinot-Aronica, St. Dizier

Variation 2:

  • Tomatoes
  • Vinegar
  • Hot peppers, mint leaves, or whole garlic cloves (optional)
  • Oil
  • Drying apparatus
  • A glass jar

Choose tomatoes that are firm and completely intact, preferably plum tomatoes. Cut them in half lengthwise. Allow them to dry on trays in the sun, bringing them in whenever it is humid, and in at night to avoid dampness. When they are dry, soak the tomatoes in warm vinegar for twenty minutes. Drain and put them in a jar, alternating layers of tomatoes with one or two hot peppers, mint leaves, or whole cloves of garlic. Press well to allow any air to escape, and then cover with oil. These tomatoes will keep for a very long time. We eat them as hors d’oeuvres or with rice, pasta, meat, or fish.

Babette Cezza, Vergt

The Best Meat Temperatures From The Gourmet Butcher

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

Have plans to fire up the grill this fourth of July? Take some advice from the gourmet butcher himself – Cole Ward – and make sure your meat is at the right temperature before you serve it to family and friends.

In the following excerpt from The Gourmet Butcher’s Guide to Meat (adapted for the Web), Ward lists the proper cooking temperatures for meat ranging from beef, lamb, and veal, to poultry, fish, and pork.

For more information on meat—how to source it ethically, cut it professionally, and prepare it properly—pick up a copy of The Gourmet Butcher’s Guide to Meat. It’s on sale now for 35% off until July 15.

By Cole Ward

What’s the Best Cooking Temperature for Meat?

Storing meat is fine, but at some point you’ll probably want to eat it (just a thought). I get lots of questions about cooking temperatures for meat. Kinda matters, ’cause we’ve all suffered through one of those disastrous dinners involving steak cooked to a crisp, or a roast bleeding onto the table. The USDA has developed guidelines for cooking temperatures of the various meats, and I urge you to consult these.

Having said that, let me tell you that I don’t follow USDA guidelines for meat temperatures except for poultry, eggs, and ground meats whose source I don’t know. I feel comfortable with this because I know the provenance of every piece of meat I consume: where it was raised, how it was raised, when and how it was slaughtered, and so on. I’m comfortable cooking it as I like it. This is probably an example of “don’t do as I do.”

Beef, Lamb, & Veal

For beef, lamb, and veal, the USDA recommends an internal temperature of 145°F (63°C). I prefer rare at 125 to 130°F (52–55°C). If you prefer medium rare, cook to 130 to 140°F (55–60°C). For medium well, 150 to 160°F (66–71°C). And if you prefer your meat well done, I can’t help you, because I would never order or cook meat well done. My preference is rare, and it can be difficult to convince a restaurant— hampered as they are by health inspection regulations—to serve you a truly rare (“blue”) steak.

If you are cooking burger from ground muscle meat that you are certain comes from a healthy local source, I recommend 140 to 145°F (60–63°C). For any other (unknown) source, 160°F (71°C) is safest and is the temperature recommended by the USDA.

Poultry & Fish

All poultry should be cooked to 165°F (74°C), and fish to at least 145°F (63°C).

Pork

I get a lot of questions about pork. Specifically, the correct internal temperature to cook it to before serving. I’m vigilant about buying only the best meat from a properly raised animal (which is why I like to know about the farmer behind the product), so an internal temperature of 145°F (63°C) is what I recommend. This gives a tender, delicious result. However, most people prefer to cook pork to a higher internal temperature of 155°F (68°C) . . . it provides peace of mind. And I agree. If you’re uncertain about the quality of the meat, err on the cautious side.

Fermentation Fun with Sandor Katz

Monday, June 30th, 2014

Here in our home state of Vermont, summer is in full swing – verdant hills of green, blue lakes and ponds, and the sound of folks out and about in the great outdoors hiking, biking, swimming, kayaking, fishing, and … fermenting?

OK, maybe fermenting is best for folks looking for some indoor activities in between outdoor activities. In that case, we have the perfect itinerary for you.

Vermonters and visitors alike will have multiple chances to see the fermentation revivalist himself – Sandor Ellix Katz – at multiple stops in Vermont throughout the month of July. Come see why Michael Pollan calls Katz “The Johnny Appleseed of Fermentation” and why his latest book The Art of Fermentation was a New York Times bestseller and won the prestigious James Beard Foundation Book Award for Reference.

Katz kicks off his Vermont tour with a two-week intensive workshop at Sterling College up in Craftsbury. As of this writing, there were two slots remaining in this credited course (four continuing education credits). The course is part of the college’s continuing education program of two- and four-week courses that offer learning opportunities that complement the college’s focus areas.

This class will offer an in-depth overview of the art and science of fermentation. Expect to learn the basics of how to ferment almost anything. Over the two weeks, attendees will make a wide variety of fermented foods and beverages, including: fermenting vegetables in many variations; beverages from seasonal fruits; kombucha, kvass, water kefir, and other lightly fermented tonic beverages; sourdough, porridges, and grain-based beverages; Asian bean ferments including Tempeh, Natto, and Dosa; yogurt, kefir, basic cheesemaking, and kishk (a Middle Eastern ferment of yogurt and bulgar wheat); and others, based upon the interests of participants. Participants will have a unique opportunity to begin fermentation projects as a group and see them through to completion, with the benefit of observing, tasting, and discussing them as they progress over several weeks.

During his two-week stay, however, Katz will venture south to Barre for a public talk at the Aldrich Public Library in Barre at 6 PM on July 16.

After his course ends, Katz will make his way from Craftsbury to Tinmouth where he’ll be the keynote speaker on July 20th at SolarFest, an iconic summer event that celebrates its 20th anniversary this year.

He then heads back north to Shelburne Farms for an evening talk (open to the public) on July 21 from 7-9 PM, followed by two full days of workshops on July 22 and 23 (pre-registration required).

During the two-day intensive at Shelburne Farms, you’ll learn how to make fermented vegetables (kimchi!), beverages (including a fruit-based wine), dairy products (yogurt, cheese, sour cream, kefir, etc.), grains, legumes, and starch. The two-day program includes lectures, demonstrations, and a hands-on element.

So, catch Katz one, twice, or a few times if you can.

RECIPE: How To Make Blue Cheese

Friday, June 27th, 2014

Attention moldy cheese lovers, this recipe is for you! It’s true, moldy isn’t usually a quality we look for in our food, but when it comes to blue cheese, the mold cultures contribute largely to its unique texture and bold flavor.

Try your hand at making an authentic Rindless Blue Cheese using the ingredients and techniques listed in the excerpt below from cheesemaking expert Gianaclis Caldwell.

If you are interested in making your own artisan cheeses, Caldwell’s book, Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking, provides an incredible amount of detail around the intricacies of cheesemaking science with instructions for preparing a variety of cheese types.

Caldwell is passionate about cheese and has been an active contributor to the recent debate regarding FDA regulations around using wooden boards in the aging process. Get the full story here.

Her book is a must have for home hobbyists and anyone serious about the commercial artisan cheese business. Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking is on sale for 35% off until July 15.

And now, it’s moldy cheese time! Enjoy

From the Garden to your Gut: Eco-Food Books 35% off

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

One thing we all know is that where our food comes from and how it is grown matters. Having control over our food supply is key to a more resilient and sustainable future.

We’ve got a wonderful crop of books to help you dive in and take that next step toward transitioning to a more local and self-sufficient food system.

A major part of Chelsea Green’s mission is to inspire you with ideas and practical tips. So whether you want to get your hands in the dirt; looking to find the best local cheese; find a new recipe; or preserve those veggies—we have the book for you, and best of all we’ve put some of our keystone food books on sale until July 15th. 

Happy Reading from the Employee Owners at Chelsea Green!

P.S. Don’t forget to check out our full list of books on sale: www.chelseagreen.com/bookstore/sale


Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books already on sale for example. Free shipping for orders $100 or more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only). International orders can be placed by phone (802-295-6300) or email.

 

Eco-Food Books: 35% off until July 15

The Art of Fermentation
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $25.97
The Permaculture Kitchen
Retail: $22.95
Sale: $14.92
The Gourmet Butcher's Guide to Meat (with CD)
Retail: $49.95
Sale: $32.47
Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking
Retail: $40.00
Sale: $26.00
Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
From the Wood-Fired Oven
Retail: $44.95
Sale: $29.22
The Small-Scale Dairy
Retail: $34.95
Sale: $22.72
Keeping a Family Cow
Retail: $19.95
Sale: $12.97
Cheese and Culture
Retail: $17.95
Sale: $11.67
The New Cider Maker's Handbook
Retail: $44.95
Sale: $29.22
Preserving Food Without Freezing or Canning
Retail: $25.00
Sale: $16.25
Wild Fermentation
Retail: $25.00
Sale: $16.25
Farm-Fresh and Fast
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
From Asparagus to Zucchini
Retail: $19.95
Sale: $12.97
Edible Perennial Gardening
Retail: $22.95
Sale: $14.92
Cooking Close to Home
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
Full Moon Feast
Retail: $25.00
Sale: $16.25
Fresh From Maine
Retail: $32.50
Sale: $21.13
Home Baked
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $25.97
The Grassfed Gourmet Cookbook
Retail: $22.95
Sale: $14.92
Long Way on a Little
Retail: $32.50
Sale: $22.72
Perennial Vegetables
Retail: $35.00
Sale: $22.75
Fresh Food From Small Places
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
Whole Foods Companion
Retail: $40.00
Sale: $26.00

~Coming this Fall: Available for Pre-Order~

The Heal Your Gut Cookbook
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
The Wild Wisdom of Weeds
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $25.97

Stay Connected:

Like what we’re up to?
Don’t forget to join our
online community too.
We’ll keep you posted
with the latest in
sustainable living.

Twitter Image
You Tube Image
Do-it-Yourself Projects

Discount Codes cannot be combined with any other offer and will not apply to sale books.  Free shipping for orders $100 or more is applied after the discount is applied and for U.S. orders only. International orders can be placed by phone (802-295-6300) or email. Pricing and sales for online orders only. Please contact a representative for wholesale or retail orders.


RECIPE: Back to Basics Tomato Sauce

Thursday, June 19th, 2014

Knowing how to make a few simple and basic recipes is key to staying flexible in the kitchen. You can easily prepare tasty meals with just the seasonal ingredients you have on hand.

This hearty tomato sauce recipe (excerpted below) is perfect for pizza, pastas, soup stocks, and more, whether you use tomatoes from the can, fresh from the farmers’ market, or even your own backyard garden.

For more recipes featuring local, seasonal, foraged, homegrown, fresh, and free-range produce, read The Permaculture Kitchen by author Carl Legge. Legge is a passionate advocate of good food with a low carbon footprint and this book is his first in a series about low impact, local, and seasonal gourmet food.

Bon appetit!

Tomato Sauce from The Permaculture Kitchen

Build a Wood-Fired Oven in Your Backyard

Thursday, June 12th, 2014

Ever dreamed of building a wood-fired oven and baking crispy pizzas, flatbreads, pastries, or even braising meats in your own backyard? Dream no longer, as you’re sure to find inspiration in Richard Miscovich’s book, From the Wood-Fired Oven: New and Traditional Techniques for Cooking and Baking with Fire.

Miscovich, a bread expert and instructor, offers a wide range of useful recipes for home and artisan bakers as well as oven designs, live-fire roasting techniques, and methods that maximize the oven’s complete heat cycle, from the initial firing to its final cooling. In the excerpt below you’ll find a few general masonry design recommendations to get you thinking about how to turn your dream wood-fired oven into a reality.

For an in-depth bread baking tutorial from Miscovich, check out his online class, Handmade Sourdough: From Starter to Baked Loaf, at Craftsy.com.

General Masonry Oven Design Tips by Chelsea Green Publishing

Tap Into Vermont’s Craft Beer Scene

Tuesday, June 10th, 2014

Vermont brewers are emerging as some of the most innovative and entrepreneurial crafters on the American beer scene, if not the world. Discover what the Green Mountain state has to offer with this recently released guidebook, FarmPlate Vermont Beer: Behind the Scenes with Vermont Craft Brewers, published by FarmPlate and distributed in partnership with Chelsea Green.

Back in the mid-1980s, Vermont microbreweries were just starting out. “Craft beer was a fringe thing—it was a missionary like movement brought to be by a few renegades who had traveled abroad and discovered that beer could be different, very different from what we’d all grown up with. It was a revelation,” writes Phil Markowski, brewmaster for Two Roads Brewing Co., in the book’s introduction.

Since then, microbreweries and craft beers have become increasingly popular and are now considered part of the American mainstream. “Today, Vermont is home to some of the most sought-after craft beers in the country, many of which seem to unknowingly break new ground. So good … if you can get them!” writes Markowski. “A few are deliciously rare and hard to find (literally take the dirt road to the right and then turn left at the tractor), only adding to their mystique.”

With FarmPlate’s guidebook in hand, you won’t miss a single hidden gem. Tour Vermont’s 32 breweries and get to know the creative minds behind the brews via exclusive interviews with these inspired visionaries. Each profile includes a Q&A with either the founder or head brewer of the microbrewery, providing insight into what inspires them as brewmasters and what the future holds for their brewery and craft brewing in general.

Inside you’ll also find:

  • A curated guide to the top 100+ beer-focused restaurants and markets in Vermont.
  • Easy-reference maps charting the featured
 craft breweries, restaurants and markets.
  • A calendar of not-to-be-missed annual beer 
events.
  • A preview of On Tap Soon breweries set to open in 2014.
  • Local sources of homebrewing supplies and hops + grains if you’re inspired to brew your own.

For the full introduction and selected excerpts from FarmPlate Vermont Beer check out this feature in Vermont Magazine.

Cheers!


Follow us
Get every new post delivered to your inbox
Join millions of other followers
Powered By WPFruits.com