Food & Health Archive


Buying Meat for the Holidays? Here Are Key Questions to Ask Your Farmer or Butcher

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

As the holiday season approaches, you may be wondering what delicious meats you’ll cook up for roundtable family feasts. But before you buy a cut of beef, pork, lamb, chicken, or anything else, there are some things you should research first.

In his forthcoming book The Gourmet Butcher’s Guide to Meat, master butcher Cole Ward arms you with key questions you should ask your local farmer or butcher.

Let’s start with what you should look for at your local charcuterie. But first—what exactly is a butcher you ask? We’ll let Cole tell you:

“You may think that the guy or gal who cuts and packages meat behind the glass window of your supermarket meat department is a butcher,” writes Ward. “You’re wrong. Those folks are meat-cutters. In the case of today’s large supermarkets, they’re really what I prefer to call meat slicers. Their training and knowledge are limited to a small set of skills that they repeat over and over. A true butcher—and there are very few left—is someone who can take a live animal from slaughter to table.”

Now that Cole has cleared that up, here are a few things to keep in mind when you visit the meat market:

• Avoid “Manager’s Special” or similarly labeled product
“When a piece of meat is nearing the end of its shelf life, you can bet that it’s suddenly the Manager’s Special,” writes Ward. “’Cause if they can’t sell it fast, they have to throw it out. Probably tomorrow.”

• If they won’t let you smell, don’t let them sell
If you’re considering pre-packaged meats, Ward warns, be sure to ask the butcher to open them up first so you can smell before you buy. “Remember, if you even question the freshness of meat, don’t eat it!”

• Beware of marinated meat in a large supermarket
“I know that many meat markets marinate their old stuff to give it more shelf life,” Ward writes.

If you go with the direct farm-to-table route, you’ll want to ask your farmer these key questions:

• How long have you been raising animals
The longer, the better!

• What is the breed of animal you use? Do you breed your animals yourself, or purchase young animals to raise?
Here, you should do some research on what are the best meat breeds for various animals. Some breeds are good for meat while others are not.

• Do you use any growth hormones, feed additives, or nontherapeutic antibiotics? If so, why?
“No” is the best answer here.

• Are they humanely slaughtered?
First, decide what “humanely slaughtered” means to you. A good first sign is an Animal Welfare Approved facility.

• Is it USDA-graded? If not, how well is it usually marbled? How do you believe it grades?
Prime, choice, and select are the best grades. The more marbling, the higher the quality grade.

Learn more tips and tricks for purchasing the best quality meat in Cole Ward’s
The Gourmet Butcher’s Guide to Meat: How to Source it Ethically, Cut it Professionally, and Prepare it Properly. This book – due in stores in February – includes a CD of more than 800 images that provide a step-by-step guide to home butchery of select cuts of pork, beef, lamb, and chicken.

Got Pie?

Wednesday, November 27th, 2013

Thanksgiving is just a day away and your pie-loving friends here at Chelsea Green thought we’d share with you one of our favorite fruit pie recipes.

The following apple pie recipe was adapted from Michael Phillips’ book The Apple Grower by the foodies over at The Washington Post and is named for Michael’s farm in northern New Hampshire. Make sure not to miss Michael’s newest book — The Holistic Orchard.

Michael recommends this pie for Thanksgiving, or other special occasions. In Vermont, we’re still picking over the last of the fall’s apple harvest in our coops so we have some fruit still worthy of being turned into pie.

Pay close attention to this recipe as it calls for cider jelly, which is a separate process that may require more time than your normal pie recipe. But, it’s well worth the extra work.

Lost Nation Cider Pie

This might be the sleeper among your holiday desserts. Lost Nation is a rural enclave in northernmost New Hampshire, near the Canadian border. Resident farmers Michael and Nancy Phillips hold an annual party at which cider from their apple orchards, and this pie, are served.

You’ll need enough pie dough, either homemade or store-bought, for a double-crust pie. Serve topped with a slice of sharp cheddar cheese or with a scoop of vanilla ice cream on the side.

MAKE AHEAD: The recipe calls for making cider jelly, which is done by boiling fresh apple cider to the jellying stage. The jelly may be made up to 5 days in advance, then covered and refrigerated. Alternatively, prepared cider jelly may be used.

If you’d like to make more than you need for this recipe, a gallon of fresh apple cider will yield about 2 cups of cider jelly. Store in sterilized canning jars.

Makes one 9-inch pie (8 servings)

Ingredients:

For the cider jelly

1/2 gallon fresh apple cider (see headnote; may substitute 1 cup store-bought cider jelly)
For the pie

homemade or store-bought pastry for a two-crust 9-inch pie
2 medium apples, such as Honeycrisp or Granny Smith, peeled, cored, cut in half, then cut into very thin slices
3/4 cup sugar
3 tablespoons cornstarch
Pinch salt
1/2 cup boiling water
1 egg, lightly beaten
1 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted and cooled slightly

Directions:

For the cider jelly: Pour the cider into a medium heavy, nonreactive pot. Bring to a boil over high heat. Use a candy thermometer to measure the temperature, which should come up to 220 degrees (the jellying stage). Boil until the cider has reduced to almost 1 cup, adjusting the heat and stirring as needed to avoid scorching. This can take from 75 to 90 minutes.

When the cider has reduced and thickened, remove it from the heat. Transfer to a heatproof container and cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

For the pie: Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Use the homemade or store-bought crust to line a 9-inch pie plate, folding under and pinching the edges to form a tidy rim. Arrange the apple slices on the surface of the bottom pie crust dough in flat layers. Have the top round of pie dough ready.

Combine the sugar, cornstarch and salt in a medium mixing bowl. Add the cider jelly and just-boiled water; mix well.

Whisk together the egg and melted butter in a liquid measuring cup, then add the mixture to the sugar-cider jelly mixture, stirring to combine. Pour the mixture carefully over the apples in the pie plate. Place the top crust on the pie; crimp the edges around the rim and use a knife to make several small cuts in the top (to allow steam to escape). Place the pie on a rimmed baking sheet (to catch any drips); bake for 40 minutes or until the top crust is golden.

Transfer the pie to a wire rack to cool for at least 20 minutes before serving.

Pastured Turkey Cooking Tips, and a Recipe for Walnut Sausage Stuffing

Tuesday, November 26th, 2013

By Shannon Hayes

For the past week, farm families across the country (including my own) have been rising each morning to engage in what has become our own unique, albeit macabre, Thanksgiving Tradition.  We are processing our turkeys. 

Unlike the factory-farmed birds found in most grocery stores, these birds are usually processed just a few feet from the lush grasses where they were raised, quite often by the same hands that first gently set their newly hatched toes into a brooder, and then carefully moved them, once they were old enough, out to the fields for a few months of free-ranging turkey living.  Now that the processing complete, our birds sit in our coolers and await our customers, who will venture out to the farm for a tradition of their own, retrieving their annual Thanksgiving feast.  For those of you who are new to this process, here is a list of tips to guide you through and make sure that you have a delicious holiday feast.

  1. Please be flexible. If you are buying your pasture-raised turkey from a small, local, sustainable farmer, thank you VERY much for supporting us. That said, please remember that pasture-raised turkeys are not like factory-farmed birds. Outside of conscientious animal husbandry, we are unable to control the size of our Thanksgiving turkeys. Please be forgiving if the bird we have for you is a little larger or a little smaller than you anticipated. Cook a sizeable quantity of sausage stuffing if it is too small (a recipe appears below), or enjoy the leftovers if it is too large.  If the bird is so large that it cannot fit in your oven, simply remove the legs before roasting it.
  2. Know what you are buying. If you don’t personally know the farmer who is growing your turkey, take the time to know what you are buying! “Pastured” is not necessarily the same as “free-range.” Some grass-based farmers use the word “free-range” to describe their pasture-raised birds, but any conventional factory farm can also label their birds “free-range” if they are not in individual cages, and if they have “access” to the outdoors – even if the “outdoors” happens to be feces-laden penned-in concrete pads outside the barn door, with no access to grass. “Pastured” implies that the bird was out on grass for most of its life, where it ate grass and foraged for bugs, in addition to receiving some grain.
  3. Brining optional. If tradition dictates that you season your meat by brining your bird, by all means, do so. However, many people brine in order to keep the bird from drying out. This is not at all necessary. Pastured birds are significantly juicier and more flavorful than factory farmed birds. You can spare yourself this extra step as a reward for making the sustainable holiday choice!
  4. Monitor the internal temperature. Somewhere, a lot of folks came to believe that turkeys needed to be roasted until they had an internal temperature of 180 degrees Fahrenheit. Yuck. You don’t need to do that. Your turkey need only be cooked to 165 degrees. If the breast is done and the thighs are not, take the bird out of the oven, carve off the legs and thighs, and put them back in to cook while you carve the breast and make your gravy. That entire holiday myth about coming to the table with a perfect whole bird and then engaging in exposition carving is about as realistic as expecting our daughters will grow up to look like Barbie (and who’d want that, anyhow?). Just have fun and enjoy the good food.
  5. Cook the stuffing separately. I know a lot of folks like to put the stuffing inside their holiday birds, and if Thanksgiving will be positively ruined if you break tradition, then stuff away. However, for a couple reasons, I recommend cooking your stuffing separately. First, everyone’s stuffing recipe is different. Therefore, the density will not be consistent, which means that cooking times will vary dramatically. I am unable to recommend a cooking time, since I cannot control what stuffing each person uses. Also, due to food safety concerns, I happen to think it is safer to cook the stuffing outside the bird. Plus, it is much easier to lift and move both the bird and the stuffing when prepared separately, and to monitor the doneness of each. Rather than putting stuffing in my bird’s cavity, I put in aromatics, like an onion, carrot, garlic and some fresh herbs. When the bird is cooked, I add these aromatics to my compost heap. The aromatics perfume the meat beautifully, and the only seasoning I wind up using on the surface is butter, salt and pepper.
  6. No need to flip. I used to ascribe to that crazy method of first roasting the bird upside down, then flipping it over to brown the breast. The idea was that the bird would cook more evenly, and the breast wouldn’t dry out. When I did this, the turkey came out fine. But I suffered 2nd degree burns, threw out my back, ruined two sets of potholders and nearly dropped the thing on the floor. Pasture-raised turkeys are naturally juicy. Don’t make yourself crazy with this stunt. Just put it in the oven breast-side up, like you would a whole chicken, and don’t over-cook it. Take it out when the breast is 165 degrees (see #2, above).   If, despite the disparaging comments in item 2, above, you still want to show off the whole bird, then bring it into the dining room, allow everyone to ooh and aah, then scuttle back to the kitchen, and proceed as explained above.
  7. Be ready for faster cook times. Pasture-raised turkeys will cook faster than factory-farmed birds. Figure on 12-15 minutes per pound, uncovered, at 325 degrees as you plan your dinner. That said, oven temperatures and individual birds will always vary. Use an internal meat thermometer to know for sure when the bird is cooked. For more help with cooking your turkey, don’t forget to refer to The Grassfed Gourmet Cookbook by Shannon Hayes. What?!? You don’t own a copy yet? Click here to buy one immediately!
  8. Use a good-quality roasting pan. If this is your first Thanksgiving and you do not yet own a turkey roasting pan and cannot find one to borrow, treat yourself to a really top-quality roaster, especially if you have a sizeable bird. (I don’t like to endorse products, but I must say that my favorite is the large stainless All-Clad roaster. Last I knew they were still made in the U.S.A. – but then, I bought mine ten years ago, so that may have changed. My mom has other name-brand roasting pans, and they are shabby in comparison to mine. Please don’t tell her I said that….) Cheap aluminum pans from the grocery store can easily buckle when you remove the bird from the oven, potentially causing the cook serious burns or myriad other injuries in efforts to catch the falling fowl.  Plus, they often end up in the recycling bin, or worse, landfills. If you buy a good quality large roasting pan, and you happen to have a copy of The Grassfed Gourmet Cookbook (another shameless hint), I guarantee you will have multiple uses for the pan!
  9. Pick the meat off the bird before making stock. If you plan to make soup from your turkey leftovers, be sure to remove all the meat from the bones before you boil the carcass for stock. Add the chunks of turkey back to the broth just before serving the soup. This prevents the meat from getting rubbery and stringy. For an extra-nutritious stock, follow the advice offered in Nourishing Traditions, by Sally Fallon, and add a tablespoon of vinegar to the water 30 minutes before you begin boiling the carcass or, better still, use the recipe for chicken stock in The Grassfed Gourmet Cookbook. The process of adding acid to the stock draws more minerals from the bones and releases them into the liquid.
  10. Help is available. In recent years, our home seems to have become the unofficial Sustainable Thanksgiving Hotline. Please do not hesitate to write to me with your questions at [email protected]. I make a point of checking email often right up through Thanksgiving Day (I stop around noon), so that I can promptly respond to your questions or concerns. Enjoy your holiday!

And finally, here’s my favorite recipe for walnut sausage stuffing:

Walnut Sausage Stuffing (serves 8 )

  • 1 whole baguette, chopped into ½ inch cubes and allowed to sit out overnight
  • 2 Tablespoons fennel seeds
  • 1 cup walnuts, mildly crushed
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 1# Sweet Italian, Hot Italian, or Breakfast sausage
  • 4 Tablespoons butter
  • 4 onions, chopped
  • 2 carrots, peeled and diced
  • 1/2 cup dried cranberries (or use one cup fresh)
  • ½ cup raisins
  • 2 T rubbed sage
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons brandy
  • 6 eggs
  • 3 cups chicken broth
  • 1 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Bring a mid-sized skillet up to a medium-hot temperature.

Add the fennel seeds and allow them to toast until fragrant.

Remove the seeds to a small dish, then add the walnuts to the same hot, dry skillet and allow them to toast 3-5 minutes, taking care to stir them constantly to prevent burning.

Pour the walnuts off into a large bowl.

Add olive oil to the same skillet, then fry the sausage until it is cooked through (about 8-10 minutes).

Remove the sausage to the same large bowl containing the walnuts.

Add the butter to the skillet, allowing it to melt and blend with the sausage drippings.

Add the onions and carrots, sauté 2 minutes, then add the cranberries and raisins and sauté two minutes longer.

Sprinkle the sage over the vegetables, sauté 1 minute, then add the garlic and toasted fennel seeds.

Sauté two minutes longer, then add the entire mixture into the large bowl with the walnuts and sausage.

To the same big bowl, add the bread, chicken broth, eggs, salt, pepper and brandy, and prepare to get messy.

Using your hands (or salad servers), thoroughly mix all the ingredients.

Butter a 13 x 9 inch baking pan, add the stuffing, then cover tightly with a piece of buttered aluminum foil.

Allow the stuffing to cook 35 minutes, the remove the foil and allow it to bake 30 minutes longer, until the top is nicely crisped and lightly browned.

Happy Thanksgiving!!!

Shannon Hayes is the host of grassfedcooking.com and the author of Long Way on a Little, The Farmer and the Grill, The Grassfed Gourmet and Radical Homemakers. She works with her family on Sap Bush Hollow Farm in Upstate New York.

RECIPE: Dry-Fried Okra

Wednesday, November 13th, 2013

Wood-fired oven are not just for baking bread and pizza! If you utilize the full heat-cycle, as Richard Miscovich details in From the Wood-Fired Oven, you can make a wide range of tasty eats during just one firing—from roasting meats and vegetables to drying herbs.

With live-fire roasting, this recipe for Dry-Fried Okra comes out nice and crispy—an alternative to the more gooey okra you’d find in gumbo or stew. Warm up your kitchen this fall and winter with Dry-Fried Okra from Miscovich’s From the Wood-Fired Oven.

What’s Got Four Legs, Provides Milk, and Is in Your Backyard?

Monday, November 11th, 2013

Cow. Just the word alone is worth repeating. Beyond that, cows provide milk, cream, butter, cheese, and meat—if you’re into that—not to mention, they’re furry and kinda cute. While most people opt for dogs, cats, or fish to keep around the house, Joann Grohman’s Keeping a Family Cow may have you reconsidering your options. Why not own a cow?

Originally published in the early 1970s as The Cow Economy, Keeping a Family Cow, Revised and Updated Edition, is the Chelsea Green edition of Grohman’s nearly forty-year-old classic that is the go-to book for homesteaders looking to keep a single cow.

“This book combines food philosophy with a practicum of knowledge and experience that Ms. Grohman has acquired in her eighty-five years in and around Jersey cows,” writes Jack Lazor of Butterworks Farm in the Foreword. “Joann’s book is a field manual for both the experienced and inexperienced alike.”

This new edition is already establishing itself as the must-read homesteader book, and has been featured on such popular food and farming websites, such as Civil Eats, as well as The Greenhorns.

In addition, Down East Magazine  wrote a great feature – with some fantastic photos – on Joann and her lifelong devotion to keeping a family cow, and it’s importance. You can get a peek of the page previews below from Patryce Bake Photography Facebook Page, but for the full slideshow make sure to visit Down East Magazine. Trust us, the photos alone are worth the click.

It includes detailed and extensive information on a variety of useful topics including:

  • The health benefits of untreated milk;
  • How to milk a cow effectively;
  • Details on calving and breeding;
  • The importance of hay quality and how to feed your cow properly;
  • Fencing and pasture management;
  • Treating milk fever and other diseases and disorders; and,
  • Making butter, yogurt, and cheese.

“Highly recommended for anyone interested in grass-based farming and nutrient-dense food—not just family cow owners—Keeping a Family Cow will instill great appreciation for the sacred bond between domesticated animal and the human beings who care for them,” writes Sally Fallon Morell, president of the Weston A. Price Foundation.

Joann is also featured speaker at this year’s Weston A. Price conference, going on now in Atlanta. And if you don’t already make sure to follow Joann on Facebook here.

Keeping a Family Cow, Revised and Updated Edition: The Complete Guide for Home-Scale, Holistic Dairy Producers is available now and on sale for 35% off until November 22nd. 

 

Read Chapter 2: What Makes Cows So Important.

Image Credit: Joann’s Facebook Page.

More than Maple: A Practical Guide to Producing and Marketing Syrup

Monday, October 28th, 2013

Everything is better with maple syrup. At least that’s what you’ll hear when you ask Vermonters. So what better way to solidify your love for all things maple than to learn how to make it yourself?

The Sugarmaker’s Companion by Michael Farrell is a comprehensive guide for both beginning and professional, home-scale and commercial maple producers, providing an invaluable resource for anyone who wants to make a profit producing syrup—and have fun doing it.

 

Farrell’s book is the only one of its kind. It includes information on:

  • Finding trees other than maple to tap, including birch and walnut;
  • How to successfully market product and create successful business models;
  • The economics of buying and selling sap;
  • Enhancing diversity in the sugarbush;
  • How to build community through producing syrup; and,
  • Ecological forest management; and more.
  • “My goal is to inspire you into action, providing information on many topics related to sustainable sap and syrup production from a variety of species,” writes Farrell in the Preface. Whether you’re a novice, an expert, or anywhere in between, The Sugarmaker’s Companion is a must-have addition to your bookshelf.

    “Mike Farrell’s The Sugarmaker’s Companion should be on every maple producer’s bookshelf,” writes Brian Chabot of Cornell University. “It contains a substantial amount of information not found elsewhere, especially marketing ideas, novel products, economic analyses, and creative ideas for expanding markets for pure maple products.”

    The Sugarmaker’s Companion: An Integrated Approach to Producing Syrup from Maple, Birch, and Walnut Trees is available now and on sale for 35% off until November 4th.

    Read Chapter 1: Why Maple Matters below.

    RECIPE: Cilantro and Pumpkin Seed Pesto

    Monday, October 21st, 2013

    It’s October, and that means you’re probably chopping, roasting, and pureeing plenty of pumpkins. But what to do once you get sick and tired of toasting all of those seeds?

    Make the most of the season’s bounty with this recipe for Cilantro and Pumpkin Seed Pesto from Cooking Close to Home: A Year of Seasonal Recipes, now available in paperback!

    The following excerpt has been adapted for the Web.

    Red Delicious: Ester’s Apple Strips

    Monday, October 14th, 2013

    Need the perfect companion to your afternoon cup of joe? Hanne Risgaard’s Home Baked: Nordic Recipes and Techniques for Organic Bread and Pastry has just the thing.

    Cozy up and use your fall apple harvest to make Ester’s Apple Strips! These strips use sweet-tart apples as the filling for a delicious baked treat.

     

    We can pickle that!

    Wednesday, October 9th, 2013

    As we approach National Pickle Day, we at Chelsea Green are here to be sure you are prepped for pickling just about anything on this very special holiday.

    Pickling goes far beyond turning cucumbers into sour or sweet sides for your sandwich, or putting up your beans and beets. To show you what we mean, we’ve compiled a few unusual pickling ideas for your perusal. From plums to pee…yes, indeed, we can pickle that!

    You’d be missing out if you didn’t try these Cinnamon Dark Red Plums, courtesy of Preserving Food without Canning or Freezing by the gardeners and farmers of Terre Vivante.

    You can catch fermentation revivalist Sandor Katz, dubbed “The Prince of Pickles” by Civil Eats, at the Fourth Annual Portland Fermentation Festival on October 23, but in the meantime, his books Wild Fermentation and The Art of Fermentation are chock full of ideas and recipes to satisfy all your pickling needs. We’ve chosen a classic recipe for sour pickles and a not-so-classic excerpt that explains how to use your own urine to improve soil fertility—a practice used throughout the world.

    Sour Pickles – From Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz

    Fermenting Urine – From The Art of Fermentation by Sandor Katz

     

    If it’s more practical pickling you prefer, pop on over to our archive of posts on how to make Dilly Beans, Ginger Beer, Dandelion Wine, Yogurt or Kefir Cheese, Sourdough Starter, and Kimchi. What’s your favorite way to pickle? Share your stories with us on Facebook or Twitter.

    Presenting our Newest Paperbacks

    Monday, October 7th, 2013

    Our latest paperback releases will help you form a deep connection with the land around you and cultivate its flavors so you can eat in season. Rediscover old favorites with the softcover editions of Wild Flavors, Cooking Close to Home, and Sowing Seeds in the Desert. Your bookshelf will thank you.

    Wild Flavors: One Chef’s Transformative Year Cooking from Eva’s Farm by Didi Emmons


    Wild Flavors is a down-to-earth book rich in ideas and inspiration for people seeking to eat from their gardens and local areas. It’s filled with mouth-watering recipes and valuable cultivation, shopping, and storage tips.” – Sandor Ellix Katz, author of The Art of Fermentation

    Alongside unique seasonal offerings, author and chef Didi Emmons provides profiles and tips on forty-six uncommon plants and shares celebrated farmer Eva Sommaripa’s wisdom about staying connected and maintaining a sane and healthy lifestyle in an increasingly hectic world.

    Curiosity sparked Emmons’ initial venture down the Massachusetts coast to meet Sommaripa, whose 200-plus uncommon herbs, greens, and edible “weeds” supply many top Northeastern chefs. Wild Flavors follows Didi through a year in Eva’s garden and offers both the warmth of their shared tales as well as the exquisite foods Didi came to develop using only the freshest of ingredients and wild edibles.

    Cooking Close to Home: A Year of Seasonal Recipes by Diane Imrie and Richard Jarmusz


    “This is a cookbook for the future—in the world we’re building, where local food means both security and pleasure, this will be a companion for many a pioneer!” – Bill McKibben, author of Deep Economy

    Eating locally is becoming a priority to people everywhere, but preparing local food throughout the four seasons can be a culinary challenge. Common questions like, “how can I eat locally in January?” or “how do I prepare what my CSA provides?” can confront even the most committed locavore. Cooking Close to Home is a seasonal guide that will inspire you to create delicious and nutritious meals with ingredients produced in your own community. Award-winning chef Richard Jarmusz and registered dietitian Diane Imrie make the ideal partners to stimulate your creativity in the kitchen, teaching you how to prepare fabulous local foods without ever sacrificing flavor for nutrition.

    Sowing Seeds in the Desert: Natural Farming, Global Restoration, and Ultimate Food Security by Masanobu Fukuoka


    Sowing Seeds in the Desert will persuade readers that the imperiled living world is our greatest teacher, and inspire them to care for it as vigorously as Fukuoka has.” – Toby Hemenway, author of Gaia’s Garden

    Sowing Seeds in the Desert is Masanobu Fukuoka’s last major work—and perhaps his most important. After the publication of his best-known work, One-Straw Revolution, Fukuoka spent years working with people and organizations around the world to prove that food can be grown and forests regenerated, with very little irrigation, even in the most desolate of places. Sowing Seeds in the Desert follows Fukuoka’s efforts to rehabilitate the deserts of the world using natural farming, to feed a growing human population, rehabilitate damaged landscapes, reverse the spread of deserts, and encourage a deep understanding of the relations.

    Wild Flavors, Cooking Close to Home, and Sowing Seeds in the Desert are available now and on sale for 35% off until October 14.


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