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Many Benefits to Home Vegetables; Rebellion is Not One

Food-Not-Lawns advocate Stan Cox, in an article on AlterNet, made the argument that while there are many benefits to converting your lawn to food-producing garden, rebellion against large agribusiness is not one of them. He asserts that the size of the dent that would be made in the profits of agribusiness—even if every American converted his and her lawn to garden—would not amount to squat. The food that we would be able to grow in our yards—vegetables and some fruits—account for only a small percentage of the American diet. All our wheat and dairy goodies would still need to come from large scale operations—the bread and butter of large agribusiness. (Yeah. I had to.) Yes, we could supplement our own garden produce with local wheat and dairy products, but the industrial food complex (restaurants, hotels, schools, etc.) would still rely on established and cheap supply chains. So, Cox argues, “sticking-it-to-the-man” isn’t really a benefit of home food production. Despite that, however, Cox points out the many advantages. From the article:
Don’t get me wrong: Growing food just outside your front or back door is an extraordinarily good idea, and if it’s done without soil erosion or toxic chemicals, I can think of no downside. Edible landscaping can look good, and it saves money on groceries; it’s a direct provocation to the toxic lawn culture; gardening is quieter and less polluting than running a power mower or other contraption; the harvest provides a substitute for industrially grown produce raised and picked by underpaid, oversprayed workers; and tending a garden takes a lot of time, time that might otherwise be spent in a supermarket or shopping mall. So it was in 2005 that our family volunteered our front lawn to be converted into the first in a now-expanding chain of “Edible Estates,” the brainchild of Los Angeles architect/artist Fritz Haeg. We already had a backyard garden, but growing food in the front yard (which, as Haeg himself points out, is a reincarnation of a very old idea) has been a wholly different, equally positive experience. Our perennials and annuals are thriving, we’ve gotten a lot of publicity, and I’ve been talking about the project for almost three years. Yet neither of our gardens, front or back, can stand up to the looming agricultural crisis. Good food’s most well-read advocate, Michael Pollan, has written that growing a garden is worth doing even though it can make only a tiny contribution to curbing carbon-dioxide emissions. He might have added that growing food is worth it even if it does very little to revive the nation’s food system.
Heather Flores, author of Food Not Lawns, would also add: community-building. Read the full article here.


Homesteading Q&A: Solutions for Stumps, Smelly Chicken Manure, and More

September is in full swing and that means it’s time to officially celebrate Homesteading Month. Throughout the next few weeks, we are putting our expert homesteading authors at your disposal for a month-long Q&A session. If you are looking to become a better homesteader or thinking of living off the land for the first time, […] Read More..

Recipe: How to Make the Perfect Pancake

When most people think pancakes, they think breakfast. But for Amy Halloran, breakfast is only the start.Halloran, author of The New Bread Basket, is a self-described pancake connoisseur. From a young age, she was entranced by the magic of bubbly batter rising to fluffy cakes on the griddle. Over time, her love of pancakes developed […] Read More..

5 Common Invasive Species and How to Manage Them

Last week, we asked authors Tao Orion and Katrina Blair to share alternative approaches to managing five different plant species commonly held to be “invasive.” St. John’s Wort, Garlic Mustard, Thistle, Oxeye Daisy, and Kudzu are often dismissed as annoyances at best and the target of aggressive eradication with harmful chemicals at worst. Orion and […] Read More..

Uncovering the Many Uses for Abundant Kudzu

As Invasive Species Week comes to a close, Tao Orion, author of Beyond the War on Invasive Species, and Katrina Blair, author of The Wild Wisdom of Weeds,  share alternative approaches to understanding and managing Kudzu. Take a look through our final profile and check out any you might have missed along the way: Oxeye […] Read More..

Oxeye Daisy: A Plant for the Pollinators

As Invasive Species Week continues, Tao Orion, author of Beyond the War on Invasive Species, and Katrina Blair, author of The Wild Wisdom of Weeds, are sharing alternative approaches to managing and using plants considered to be “invasive.” Take a look through today’s profile on Oxeye Daisy and check out tips for working with Garlic […] Read More..