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RECIPE: Low-Carb, Keto-Friendly Cracking Crackers

The-Ketogenic-Kitchen-Cracking-Crackers-Blog-Cover

If you’re anything like me, you know how hard it can be to resist the delectable crunch and pure happiness that comes from enjoying your favorite snack cracker. Unfortunately, when you need to cut carbs it can be hard to find a substitute that truly quenches the cravings. Until now. These Cracking Crackers from The Ketogenic Kitchen by Domini Kemp and Patricia Daly will help you get your fix!

 


Cracking Crackers

Ingredients – Makes about 12 crackers

2.6 oz sunflower seeds (75g)

2.1 oz chia seeds (60g)

1.6 oz psyllium seed husks (most health stores have these) (45g)

1.6 oz flaxseeds (45g)
1.1 oz pumpkin seeds (30g)

0.7 oz sesame seeds (20g)

2 tsp fennel seeds (10g)

1 1⁄2 tsp sea salt or Himalayan pink salt (8g)

1 tsp dried thyme (1g)
3 good tbsp coconut oil (81g)

7⁄8c boiling water (200ml)

Directions

These crackers were adapted ever so slightly from the original recipe from Sarah Britton’s book, My New Roots. The trick was to remove the oats. Oats, in general, are a great food, but they are mega high in carbohydrates. After many attempts, here they are: low-carb, grain-free and absolutely delicious.

Preheat the oven to 340°F (170°C ). Line a baking tray with non-stick baking paper.

Put all the dry ingredients in a large bowl and mix well. Next, add the coconut oil to the boiling water so it melts. Once this has melted, add this to the dry ingredients and mix well to form a wet dough that’s kind of cement-like.

Pour the sludge into the lined baking tray and smooth it out with a spatula. If the mix is being really uncooperative, sprinkle it with water so it gets a bit wetter and therefore spreads easier. It just means you’ll have to cook them longer. Press down the mix roughly so it spreads out, then place a second sheet of non-stick baking paper on top of the cracker blanket and carefully apply pressure to make the mixture thinner and so that it covers the whole tray. It’s easier doing it this way than with a rolling pin.

When that’s done, remove the top piece of baking paper and bake the crackers for 30 minutes. If you can, use a flat surface to flip them over (like you would one half of a cake) and bake for another 20 minutes. If you find the outside bits are going nice and brown but the inside is still a bit raw, break off the cooked bits and keep cooking the middle. They need to be really crisp and golden brown, not raw and wet or soft. Turn off the oven and leave them to cool fully and dry out before breaking up into rough squares or rectangles for serving.

If after a day or so you find they need to be crunchier, stick them back in the oven for a blast. The main thing is to let them truly cool down before you store them, or any residual heat will make them sweaty and soggy. Ewww.

This recipe has been adapted for the web.

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