Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

DIY Dilly Beans: Voted “Best Snack Ever”

For those who love fermented foods, I now welcome you into the world of the dilly bean. If you already make your own, this recipe is killer. If you’ve yet to try it…and you’re like me, a vinegar obsessed freak on the verge of collapse every time a pickle is near, then brace yourself for the best snack ever. Voted on by me, and by the folks at Chelsea Green.

There’s nothing like a dilly bean. A jar full of ’em in the fridge, next to a plate of cheese and crackers, on a sandwich, or straight from the jar in the middle of winter when you’re sick of potatoes and pasta. Dilly beans! I’m picking all my beans this weekend and dilly-ing them. And you can do it too, even if you have to buy beans at the farmer’s market or wherever you shop. (They also make great gifts, and housewarming presents, and things to bring your hostess…just grab a jar from storage, and bam.)

The following is an excerpt from Wild Fermentation: The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-Culture Foods by Sandor Katz. It has been adapted for the Web.

Dilly Beans

Pickling food in vinegar is not a fermentation process. In brine pickling, vegetables are preserved by lactic acid, which is produced by the action of microorganisms on the vegetables. Vinegar pickling makes use of a fermented product, vinegar, but the acidity of the vinegar prevents microorganism action. Vinegar pickles contain no live cultures. According to Preserving Food Without Freezing or Canning, a book by Terre Vivante, a French eco-education center focused on organic gardening and preservation of Old World food-preservation techniques, “Pickles were always lacto-fermented in times past, and then transferred to vinegar solely to stabilize them for commercial purposes.” Indeed, the great advantage that vinegar pickling has over lacto-fermentation pickling is that vinegar pickles will last forever (well, almost), while brined pickles will last for weeks or months, but rarely for years, and definitely not forever. Cookbooks are full of vinegar pickling recipes, so I will offer just one: the dilly beans my father makes from his garden every summer and serves to his family and friends all year long.

TIMEFRAME:

6 weeks

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT:

  • Sealable canning jars: 1 ½ pint/750 milliliter size is best, as its height perfectly accommodates the length of string beans

INGREDIENTS:

  • String beans
  • Garlic
  • Salt (my dad swears by coarse kosher salt, but sea salt is fine, too)
  • Whole dried chili peppers
  • Celery seed
  • Fresh dill (flowering tops best, or leaves)
  • White distilled vinegar
  • Water

PROCESS:

  1. Guesstimate how many jars you’ll fill with the string beans you have. Thoroughly clean jars and line them up.
  2. Into each jar, place 1 clove of garlic, 1 teaspoon (5 milliliters) of salt, 1 whole red chili pepper, ¼ teaspoon (1.5 milliliters) of celery seed, and a flowering dill top or small bunch of dill leaves. Then fill the jar with beans standing on end, stuffing them as tightly as you can into the jar.
  3. For each jar you have filled, measure 1 cup (250 milliliters) of vinegar and 1 cup (250 milliliters) of water. Boil the vinegar-water mixture, then pour it into the jars over the beans and spices, to ½ inch (1 centimeter) from the top of the jar.
  4. Seal the jars and place them in a large pot of boiling water for a 10-minute heat processing.

Leave the dilly beans for at least 6 weeks for the flavors to meld, then open jars as desired and enjoy. My father serves these dilly beans as an hors d’oeuvre. Heat-processed pickles can be stored for years without refrigeration.


Recipe: Sandor’s Strawberry Kvass (from Wild Fermentation)

Since its publication in 2003, Wild Fermentation has inspired people to turn their kitchens into food labs: fermenting vegetables into sauerkraut, milk into cheese or yogurt, grains into sourdough bread, and much more.This updated and revised edition, now with full color photos throughout, is sure to introduce a whole new generation to the flavors and health […] Read More

Recipe: Fermented Hot Sauce with Wild Greens

Like hot sauce? Fermenting? Wild greens? This Fermented Hot Sauce with Wild Greens recipe from The New Wildcrafted Cuisine has it all! Wild foods are becoming increasingly popular, as more and more people want to learn how to identify plants and forage for their own ingredients, but self-described “culinary alchemist” deeply explores the flavors of […] Read More

The Fermentation Revolution Wants You!

Michael Pollan calls him the “Johnny Appleseed of Fermentation” and he’s known far and wide as Sandorkraut. He’s also been dubbed The Prince of Pickles and a Fermentation Fetishist, but we also know him as Sandor Ellix Katz—The New York Times-bestselling and Beard Award-winning author. With the long-awaited and soon-to-be celebrated release of the updated […] Read More

Two Recipes: Blossom Butter; Herb Garden Butter

We’re always looking for ways to put our summer garden blossoms and herbs to good use in the kitchen. These two recipes offer simple ways to use edible flowers and herbs that you can pick right in your backyard.These recipes are from The Occidental Arts and Ecology Cookbook, the 2016 IACP Cookbook Awards WINNER!  (“Food […] Read More

Sandor Katz Keeps the Revolution Alive with a Revised Edition of Wild Fermentation

Sandor Ellix Katz returns to the iconic book that started the fermentation revolution, but with a fresh perspective, renewed enthusiasm, and expanded wisdom from his travels around the world.  This self-described fermentation revivalist is perhaps best known simply as Sandorkraut (see the fun image below), which describes his joyful and demystifying approach to making and eating fermented foods, […] Read More
Follow us
Get every new post delivered to your inbox
Join millions of other followers
Powered By WPFruits.com