Chelsea Green News Archive


How to Start a Traditional Compost Pile in Your Yard

Wednesday, April 9th, 2014

As a society, we make a lot of waste, especially in this culture of on-the-go single-serve disposables. As we work toward the Zero Waste Solution with Extended Producer Responsibility and other government mandated universal recycling of solid waste in the works, there is plenty you can do to reduce the amount of waste you send to the landfill.

Use less, recycle and reuse packaging materials, and compost your organic waste. And if you’re a gardener, there’s no reason to throw away this beneficial (and cheap!) source of nourishment for your soil. Compost is the key to a flourishing garden. Easily turn your kitchen scraps and yard waste into food your garden will love.

******

The following is an excerpt from Fresh Food from Small Spaces: The Square-Inch Gardener’s Guide to Year-Round Growing, Fermenting, and Sprouting by R. J. Ruppenthal. It has been adapted for the Web.

If you have enough space to start a compost pile in your yard, make sure your local city and county ordinances permit it. Some of them have restrictions because open piles can attract rodents and create odors. Assuming that your area allows open-air composting, consider whether you can fit three piles in your yard: one for new compost, one for aging compost, and one for the finished stuff that goes back on your plants. If you just have room for one, that is fine, but in order for your pile to fully break down, you will need to stop adding new material at some point and let it decompose.

Some compost piles are hot, while others never get very warm, and this is a function of the biological activity in the pile while the organisms do their thing. Getting your pile to heat up naturally depends on a long list of factors, including pile size, materials, layering, moisture, external heat, and other variables. But even if it does not heat up much, sooner or later the stuff will break down and you’ll have some good dirt to use on your plants.

Cold compost is perfectly acceptable stuff; it just takes a bit longer to make. Some gardening purists hold that the nutritional content of hot-cooked compost is far superior, but if you are using it as more of a soil amendment than a fertilizer, then this should not matter much. If you want to follow the pure wisdom, then the minimum size for a hot pile is about 4′ x 4′, which will allow enough internal space to create the proper conditions for this biological activity to take place.93 In lieu of this, any untidy heap will break down at its own pace.

Compost Bin

What should you put in your compost pile? Will it stink? Do you have to turn it regularly? The answers are: anything organic, a bit, and not really.

Dead leaves, lawn clippings, food scraps (except meat or fat), newspaper, cardboard, and manure are all organic matter and will break down in your compost pile. Ideally, you want to add a diversity of ingredients.

The pile will break down faster if you add both “browns” (dry ingredients such as dead leaves, newspaper, and cardboard) and “greens” (wet stuff such as food scraps, lawn clippings, and fresh manure).

“Greens” contain plenty of nitrogen while “browns” have more carbon, and your pile needs both. Conventional wisdom holds that the proper ratio is 2 parts “browns” to 1 part “greens,” but you can vary this ratio somewhat. Just remember that a pile of 100 percent leaves takes a lot longer to break down, and 100 percent food scraps may turn into a very wet and slimy mess long before it breaks down. Also, the more diverse sources of waste you add, the better its nutritional output will be for your soil.

Your new pile will stink a bit at first, but if you have never composted before, then you will be pleasantly surprised. It’s not as smelly as you would think. In its early stages, you can cover the compost pile with burlap, a tarp, or a layer of “brown” ingredients such as leaves or cardboard, which will help seal in the moisture and limit any odors. As the compost ages, it begins to smell more earthy, a fragrance that some actually enjoy.

Your compost is finished when you can no longer recognize the individual materials that went into it.

Aerating the pile is optional, but it may speed up the process by delivering oxygen where it’s needed. Use a pitchfork to turn the pile and make sure that both air and moisture are reaching each part. You can do this weekly or less often. And, if you do not want to turn the pile, then it will aerate naturally with time as the layers break down and settle.

Who’s Fuelin’ Whom?

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

UPDATE: April Fools! We’re not really publishing a home-scale fracking book but thanks to everyone who shared our prank! Stay up to date with our (actual) latest releases by signing up for our e-newsletter here

Tapping into the growing interest in fracking and the development of shale gas, Chelsea Green Publishing – the nation’s leading publisher on home-scale, do-it-yourself books about food, fuel, and shelter – is offering a new manual for homesteaders—The Plunderer’s Companion: Home-Scale Fracking and Micro Mining for the Homestead and Farm by Sue T. Boottes.

The book will follow on the heels of this Spring’s anticipated book, Extracted: How the Quest for Mineral Wealth is Plundering the Planet. In Extracted, author Ugo Bardi explains the history of mining, and how it has played into empire building, and collapse, and could be poised to do so again.

As Bardi points out in his forthcoming book Extracted, large corporations and nation states are close to exhausting many of the key rare Earth minerals we need to fuel our global economy. So, why should they get to hoard all of those resources and hold other nations hostage? It’s time to reclaim and relocalize these important economic resources.

Once the global mining machine stalls for good, you’ll be prepared to react and have a prospering, locally owned business to server your community’s fuel needs.

“Why pay someone else to fracture the Earth’s crust to get at that valuable fuel that’s right under your feet? Why not drill yourself and reap the profits for you and your progeny?” writes Boottes. “This is not just home-fracking for fun and profit, but an effort to rekindle the craft of deep earth mining and apply those techniques to a modern mining age that is crumbling under its own weight. You’ve heard of slow food, and slow money…this is slow mining.”

“Plunder and get rich: it is right there for the taking!” adds Boottes.

The Plunderer’s Companion is fully illustrated with detailed designs and easy-to-follow steps for readers to start mining or drilling deep beneath the crust of their backyard in a safe and economical fashion. And, best of all, this book demonstrates how you can do this with simple tools you may already have laying around the homestead – shovels, pickaxes, high-pressure hoses, piping, cold frames, and rain barrels.

The author also describes how it is important to take into account that not everyone might be as excited as you are about your home-scale fracking endeavor. Dealing with nosy neighbors is especially challenging for those living in suburban and urban areas. Boottes offers advice such as camouflaging the drill sites with fruit and nut tree plantings, drilling when neighbors are not around, and leading discussions to educate your community about the benefits of locally sourced gas and oil.

And, for those immediate neighbors, who may have noticed your horizontal drilling extend underneath their garden, Boottes suggests breaking the ice with a gift of a small mason jar of liquefied natural gas to help them get on board with your new hobby. “These kind gestures may come in handy down the road if you run out of room to store any excess ‘byproduct,’” Boottes writes.

In The Plunderer’s Companion, readers will also learn how to:

  • Plant perennials that can co-exist with your drill sites;
  • Create a community-supported mining operation/Oil Share;
  • Power your mining operation with draft horses to keep from using up those fossil fuels you’re trying to sell at a premium to your neighbors;
  • Prepare the chemical cocktail to inject in the drill hole from commonly found ingredients;
  • Use the exhaust of the engine of your car to pressurize the hole and frack the rock underground. From the same hole, you’ll get natural gas directly to power your home heating system; and;
  • Take full advantage of the global extraction boon by micro mining. This emerging extractive process is designed for homeowners who might be sitting on top of a gold mine – literally – of rare earth minerals.

Hands of Coal

We know that food, when fresh and unprocessed like raw milk, is more nutrient-dense and beneficial for the body. In recent studies, locally sourced, small-scale fossil fuels have been found to be even more powerful than the homogenous, corporate commodities sold by big oil and gas companies. A little goes a long way in the home-scale fracking industry. Start your family drilling operation today and join the frackavore movement.

 

Perennial Gardening: Grow More Food with Less Work!

Thursday, March 27th, 2014

Perennial vegetables are a food gardener’s dream. Plant them once, treat them well, and they’ll keep feeding you year after year.

If you’re looking for some new crops to liven up your garden and your palate, give perennials a chance. You’ll have plants you never dreamed could be dinner. We’ve included below some perennial inspired projects to get you started! 

25% Off Entire Selection of Gardening Books until March 31st.

In cased you missed our previous “Garden Series” projects you can take a look here and here. Everything from building fertile soil, planning the best garden, starting seedlings and crop selection – we have you covered.

Looking for more backyard projects? Learn the basics of seed saving here and beekeeping for beginners here.

 

Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books already on sale for example.
Free shipping for orders $100 or more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only). 


Perennials Perfect for Shady Spots
VIDEO: Four Perennials Perfect for Shady Spots

Eric Toensmeier is the reigning expert on these easy-to-grow crops, and his new DVD takes you on a plant-by-plant tour.

In this video, Eric introduces four perennial crops that do well in shady spots. Watch and learn more about these versatile veggies.  Plant it »»


Backyard Permaculture Paradise
Building Your Backyard Permaculture Paradise

As you look out on your snow-covered (or just barren) backyard, here is how Eric Toensmeier and Jonathan Bates approached those initial phases of transformation–along with their site designs.

We hope this provides you with plenty of spring planting ideas and inspiration for the coming gardening season. Plan it »»


Perennials are the Best Bang for Your Buck
6 Reasons Why Perennials Are the Best Bang for Your Buck


If you’ve ever debated whether perennial plants are right for your landscape, author Ben Falk is here to help.
 Plant it »»


The Grafter's Handbook
How to Graft the Perfect Tree


Trees are the ultimate perennial and with care will continue to produce for years and even decades.

Learning the art and science of grafting fruit trees can give an old tree a new life, or perhaps give some continuing life to a variety you love. Learn it »»

 


~ ~ Garden Savings: 25% Off  ~ ~
Perennial Vegetables SetRetail $59.95
Sale: $44.96
Paradise Lot
Retail $19.95
Sale: $14.96
The Resilient Farm and Homestead
Retail $40.00
Sale: $30.00
Gaia's Garden, 2nd Edition
Retail $29.95
Sale $22.46
The Grafter's HandbookRetail $40.00
Sale $30.00
Natural Beekeeping, Revised and ExpandedRetail $34.95
Sale: $26.21
Sepp Holzer's Permaculture
Retail $29.95
Sale: $22.46
Food Not Lawns
Retail $25.00
Sale: $18.75
Edible Forest Gardens (2 volume set)
Retail $150.00
Sale $112.50
The Permaculture KitchenRetail $22.95
Sale $17.21

Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books
already on sale for example. Free shipping for orders $100 or
more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only)
 
per inceptos himenaeos.

Spring is Here! Get your Garden Started

Thursday, March 20th, 2014

Congratulations, you survived another long winter! It is officially spring and time to get your garden started.

Let us help you on your way with some of our key gardening books. Learn tried and true techniques from our expert gardening authors so you can reap a plentiful harvest this fall.

We’ve included some tips and projects below for some inspiration in your garden planning and preparation; from creating fertile soil, to building the edibles-producing superstar, selecting the most promising veggies, and garden tips for the urban dweller.

Keep checking our website for the month of March with more posts as part of our “Garden Series” for planting tips and tricks for the coming gardening season. You can browse the first round of tips and projects here.


Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books already on sale for example.
Free shipping for orders $100 or more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only).
Fertile Soil for an Abundant Garden

Compost is the key to a lush, abundant garden. Do you know how to turn kitchen scraps and yard waste into fragrant, crumbly, plant food? If not, your garden is missing out!

It’s not difficult. Compost wants to happen. Plan it »»

 


Garden Planning: 48 of the Most Promising Veggies

Decisions. Decisions. Decisions.

With so many options to choose from, proper planning techniques are key for an efficient (and blooming) garden.

Master grower Eliot Coleman outlines the most promising crops and charts the harvesting seasons to help you decide when and what to plant. Plan it »»


Build an Herb Spiral:The Ultimate Raised Bed

The herb spiral: A beautiful year-round focal point for your garden that is easy (and fun) to build and saves both space and water.

Get ready to plan and build this edibles-producing superstar. Build it »»


No Space? No Problem. Gardening Tips for the Urban Dweller

Interested in growing fresh food, but worried about lack of space? Not a problem. 

Choosing the right crops based on climate and light, joined with a companion planting strategy, can help maximize food production with limited space. Transform your urban space into productive garden! Grow it »»


~ ~ Gardening Sale: 25% Off  ~ ~
The Resilient GardenerRetail $24.95
Sale: $18.71
Fresh Food From Small Places
Retail $24.95
Sale: $18.71
New Organic Grower
Retail $24.95
Sale: $18.71
The New Vegetable Growers Handbook
Retail $27.95
Sale $20.96
The Organic Grain GrowerRetail $45.00
Sale $33.75
Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture TwistRetail $24.95
Sale: $18.71
The Holistic Orchard
Retail $39.95
Sale: $29.96
Breed Your Own Vegetable Varieties
Retail $29.95
Sale: $22.46
Growing Healthy Vagetable Crops
Retail $12.95
Sale $9.71
The Winter Harvest HandbookRetail $29.95
Sale $22.46


Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books
already on sale for example. Free shipping for orders $100 or
more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only)
 
per inceptos himenaeos.

Gene Logsdon: Farmer, Philosopher, Curmudgeon

Wednesday, February 12th, 2014

Unlike most octogenarians, author Gene Logsdon is picking up steam as he rolls into his ninth decade. He has developed a prolific body of work as a writer, novelist, and journalist on topics ranging from a philosophical look at woodlands (A Sanctuary of Trees) to the higher calling of manure (Holy Shit). Who else could accomplish such a task, but the beloved Gene Logsdon.

In his latest book, Gene Everlasting: A Contrary Farmer’s Thoughts on Living Forever, we find Logsdon at the top of his game as he reflects on nature, death, and eternity, always with an eye toward the lessons that farming taught him about life and its mysteries—including those of parsnips. Yes, parsnips. In Gene Everlasting, Gene has an imaginary interview with a parsnip and seeks its advice on everlasting life. “Mr. Parsnip” responds:

Develop a distinctive personality like we parsnips do, with a taste only appreciated by the few rather than by the many. You want to appeal to the discerning minority, not the herd-like majority, which is always susceptible to the moneychangers. If you are too desirable as a plant, the gene manipulators will bioengineer you into oblivion. 

Publishers Weekly calls Gene Everlasting, “Great bedtime reading, these succinct, thought-provoking, life-affirming essays are a perfect gift for your favorite gardener, nature lover, philosopher, or curmudgeon.”

Gene Everlasting is praised by Kirkus Reviews as a “perceptive and understatedly well-written meditation.” Booklist adds, “While his legion of fans may pale at the thought that Logsdon has just written his swan song, his recent remission from cancer offers hope that his writing days are far from over.”

As any regular reader of his blog can attest, Gene is hardly letting cancer slow him down as a writer. “I think cancer drove me to write more rather than less for the same reason that a fruit tree will increase output if its bark is lacerated with cuts and slashes,” writes Logsdon in Gene Everlasting. “Threatened with danger, the writer as well as the apple tree is frightened into greater production.”

Here’s to a healthy future, Gene. We look forward to more musings and contrarian output. In the meantime, take advantage of this opportunity to download a FREE CHAPTER and read an excerpt from Gene Everlasting. We dare you not to be touched by this author’s humor, insight, and endearing, curmudgeonly spirit. 

Sign up here and we’ll email Chapter 7: Georgie the Cat right to your inbox along with a special 35% discount code good towards any book. But hurry – this offer only lasts until 03/05!

Updated: Our limited time, free download has ended. But don’t forget when you sign up for our enewsletter you get 25% off your next purchase in our online bookstore.

Survive the Winter Blues: Save 25 – 60% Off

Thursday, January 30th, 2014

There is no denying it: the days are shorter and unless you planned for a winter garden, fresh vegetables from your backyard have long passed.

But don’t let the winter get you down. There are plenty of recipes to last you through the cold season and into the ‘hungry gap’.

Winter Sale: 25 – 60% Off Selected Titles
Until February 15th

We’ve shared a few easy, DIY recipes: from growing your own sprouts, a new take on flank steak, fermenting, baking, and of course day dreaming (and planning) for spring.

For next year, don’t limit your harvest to summer months. Dive into Four Season Harvest and The Winter Harvest Handbook so you can grow cold-hardy winter crops through the most biting cold.

Happy reading (and eating) from your friends at Chelsea Green Publishing.

Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books already on sale for example.
Free shipping for orders $100 or more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only). 


Sprouts: Breath Life back into Winter

Is your root cellar down to potatoes and onions? Fear not – growing sprouts is one of the simplest things you can do to breathe life into the deprivations of winter. Grow it »»
 


The Gourmet Butcher’s Pig in a Flanket

 

Looking for a new take on the flank steak? Let master butcher Cole Ward guide you with this easy and tasty recipe. Make it »»

 


Chop, Salt, Pack, Wait: Four Simple Steps to Making the Best Sauerkraut on Earth

Four easy steps are all you need to turn veggies into a long-lasting, tangy condiment perfect to serve alongside sausage or eggs.

So go ahead, make friends with the microbes in your life. Make it »»

 


Sweet Desserts: Cinnamon Spiral

Warm up your kitchen this winter with this sweet temptation. This isn’t just any bread – the crumb is firm and reminiscent of pound cake, while the crust is soft.

Cinnamon Spiral is comfort food with style.  Bake it »»

 


Start Seedlings in a Cold Frame

Are you ready to get a start on the gardening season? With a cold frame you can jump in now.

Farmer Eliot Coleman is the master of growing vegetables year-round, and he has some simple guidelines for using cold frames to start seedlings right. Build it »»


~ ~ Winter Savings: 25% Off  ~ ~
Gourmet Butcher's Guide (Coming in Jan)Retail $49.95
Sale: $37.46
The Resilient Farm and Homestead
Retail $40.00
Sale: $30.00
From the Wood-Fired Oven
Retail $44.95
Sale: $33.71
The Sugarmaker's Companion
Retail $39.95
Sale $29.96
The New Cider Maker's HandbookRetail $44.95
Sale $33.71

~ ~ Winter Deeper Savings: 40% Off ~ ~

The Winter Harvest Handbook
Retail $29.95
Sale: $17.97

Wild Fermentation
Retail $25.00
Sale: $15.00
Wild Flavors Cover
Retail $24.95
Sale: $14.97
The Grafter's Handbook
Retail $40.00
Sale: $24.00

Four-Season Harvest
Retail $24.95
Sale: $14.97

Gaia's Garden, 2nd Edition
Retail $29.95
Sale: $17.97
The Resilient Gardener Cover
Retail $29.95
Sale: $17.97
Slow Gardening
Retail $29.95
Sale: $17.97
~ ~ Need More? Clearance Selection: 60% Off  ~ ~
Chasing Chiles
Retail $17.95
Sale: $7.18
Home Baked
Retail $39.95
Sale: $15.98
Growing Healthy Vagetable Crops
Retail $12.95
Sale: $5.18
Sharing the Harvest
Retail $35.00
Sale: $14.00
Full Moon Feast
Retail $25.00
Sale: $10.00

Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books
already on sale for example. Free shipping for orders $100 or
more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only)
 
per inceptos himenaeos.

Forget Something? Holiday Sale Extended!

Monday, January 6th, 2014

Our Holiday Sale has been such a success we’re extending it through January 15, 2014! So, while the holiday’s may have passed, you can still save 35% site-wide with discount code CGS13 (plus free shipping if you spend $100 or more).

Need some inspiration? Browse some of our Classic and Best Selling Books. Or maybe you’re planning ahead for spring? Check our gardening, homesteading and permaculture titles. Want to beef up your foodie skills? Give our preserving, fermenting and cooking books a look.

And don’t forget about our New Releases and Award Winning books of 2013.

Happy New Year from the Employee Owners at Chelsea Green

P.S. We’ve highlighted some books below but you can always browse our full online bookstore here: http://www.chelseagreen.com/bookstore


*Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books already on sale for example.
Free shipping for orders $100 or more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only).

Classic and Best Selling

The Art of Fermentation
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $25.97
Gaia's Garden
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
Four-Season Harvest
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
The Straw Bale House
Retail: $34.95
Sale: $22.72

View More

Gardening, Homesteading and Permaculture

Paradise Lot
Retail: $19.95
Sale: $12.97
The Resilient Farm and Homestead
Retail: $40.00
Sale: $26.00
The Winter Harvest Handbook
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47

View More

Preserving, Fermenting and Cooking

From the Wood-Fired Oven
Retail: $44.95
Sale: $29.22
Preserving Food Without Freezing or Canning
Retail: $25.00
Sale: $16.25
Wild Fermentation
Retail: $25.00
Sale: $16.25

New Releases

Fields of Farmers
Retail: $25.00
Sale: $16.25
The New Cider Maker's Handbook
Retail: $44.95
Sale: $29.22
Keeping a Family Cow
Retail: $19.95
Sale: $12.97
The Sugarmaker's Companion
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $25.97


Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books
already on sale for example. Free shipping for orders $100 or
more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only)

Chelsea Green’s Award-Winning Books of 2013

Monday, December 30th, 2013

The James Beard Foundation. The Society of Environmental Journalists. The American Horticulture Society. The Garden Writers Association. Nautilus. The New York Book Show. ForeWord Reviews. These are just a few of the many prestigious outlets and organizations that honored Chelsea Green authors this past year with top writing and publishing awards.

These awards recognize the quality of our authors’ ideas, the power of their writing, and in some cases, the beauty of the book’s design and presentation.

Topping the awards list in 2013 were three books published in 2012: The Seed Underground by Janisse Ray, The Art of Fermentation by Sandor Ellix Katz, Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking by Gianaclis Caldwell; a fourth top award winner was published in early 2013, The Organic Seed Grower by John Navazio.

Ray’s book was honored with five awards in 2013, from horticultural and garden writers to journalistic organizations. This breadth of awards matches the range and depth of her book, which is a masterfully woven narrative about seeds, seed saving, and the people who are on the frontlines of preserving these heirloom and heritage seeds in a world dominated by the corporate control of seeds.

Caldwell’s gorgeously designed and illustrated cheesemaking book is a must-have for foodies who want to make cheese at home, or even start thinking about selling small batches. Caldwell walks readers through recipes and tips to make top-notch soft and hard rind cheeses. Chelsea Green’s production team also won some deserved credit, too, for the book design awards this book won.

One of the biggest awards this year was the James Beard Foundation Book Award, which was given to Sandor Ellix Katz for his book, The Art of Fermentation. Katz took home the top award in the Best Reference and Scholarship category.

Several other books took home top honors, or came darn close as finalists or honorable mentions. To recap another great year for Chelsea Green authors and our production and editorial teams, the full list of award-winners (and runners-up) are listed below:

The Seed Underground

Won: The Green Prize for Sustainable Literature, Agriculture
Won: Nautilus Award, Gold Book Award, Green Living
Won: Garden Writers Association Awards, Gold Award of Achievement, Writing-Book-General
Won: American Horticultural Society Book Award
Won: American Society of Journalists and Authors, Arlene Eisenberg Award for Writing That Makes a Difference

The Art of Fermentation

Won: James Beard Awards, Best Reference and Scholarship
Finalist: IACP Cookbook Awards, Reference
Finalist: Books for a Better Life Award

Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking

Won: ForeWord Book of the Year, Gold, Reference
Won: New England Book Show Awards, Professional-Illustrated
Won: New York Book Show Awards, Scholarly
Finalist: IACP Cookbook Awards, Reference

The New Feminist Agenda

Won: ForeWord Book of the Year, Bronze, Women’s Studies
Won: Ernesta Drinker Ballard Book Prize

Nuclear Roulette

Finalist: ForeWord Book of the Year, Ecology & Environment

The Organic Seed Grower

Won: Garden Writers Association Awards, Silver Award of Achievement, Publisher/Producer—Book—Technical
Won: American Horticultural Society Book Award

Reinventing Fire

Won: Nautilus Award, Gold Book Award, Business/Leadership
Won: ForeWord Book of the Year, Gold, Business & Economics

The Holistic Orchard - Won: American Horticultural Society Book Award

Taste, Memory - Won: Amazon Best Books of the Year, #9 in Food Literature

Cheese and Culture - Finalist: IACP Cookbook Awards, Culinary History

2052 - Honorable Mention: SEJ Awards: Rachel Carson Environment Book Award

Top-Bar Beekeeping - Finalist: New Mexico Book Awards, Craft/Hobby/How-To

From Horse Power to Pee Power: Best Blog Posts of 2013

Monday, December 23rd, 2013

It’s hard to pick favorites. But, we took some time to reflect on some of the blog posts that you loved the most from this year.

To start on a good note, we had two books featured in The New York Times. The New Horse-Powered Farm  and Paradise Lot both graced the pages of the Home and Garden section.

apocalypticaContinuing on our great media streak, The Art of Fermentation was selected as a James Beard Award Winner!

And remember April Fools Day? Chelsea Green introduced Apocalyptica —a new sustainable erotica imprint. Everyone had a laugh over our re-worked book titles. And, who knows? With the continued strong growth among Romantic titles, perhaps some of these books will be discreetly placed on a bookshelf in a bookstore near you.

SauerkrautWe continued the year by telling readers about the The Power of Pee  — a natural way to enrich your soil. We also taught folks how to make the best sauerkraut on Earth  and said over and over again, “we can pickle that!”. Because, well, you can pickle that. Whatever it is.

From The New York Times features to April Fools Day fun, we enjoy bringing you fresh content on all things related to sustainable living.

What were your favorite posts of 2013? Share your thoughts with us on Facebook and Twitter.

Looking for the Perfect Gift?

Monday, December 9th, 2013

Chelsea Green is the perfect place to stock up on inspiring and educational gifts for everyone on your list (and don’t forget about yourself).

You’ll find the right gift for anyone, from gardeners and political activists to entrepreneurs, builders, foodies and cooks – we’ve got the book for you.

Use the discount code CGS13* at checkout to save 35% off your entire order from now until the end of the year. Take a look at some of our new and popular titles below to get started, or browse our full on-line bookstore.

Happy Holiday’s from the folks at Chelsea Green

P.S. Don’t forget there is free shipping on orders over $100*


*Discount codes do not combine with other offers—our books already on sale for example.
Free shipping for orders $100 or more is applied after the discount is applied. (U.S. Orders Only).

Gardening and Agriculture

Edible Forest Gardens (2 volume set)
Retail: $150.00
Sale: $97.50
The Resilient Farm and Homestead
Retail: $40.00
Sale: $26.00
Gaia's Garden, 2nd Edition
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
Market Farming Success, Revised and Expanded Edition
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
The Grafter's Handbook
Retail: $40.00
Sale: $26.00
Keeping a Family Cow
Retail: $19.95
Sale: $12.97
The Resilient Gardener
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
Perennial Vegetables
Retail: $35.00
Sale: $22.75

View More

Sustainable Food

From the Wood-Fired Oven
Retail: $44.95
Sale: $29.22
The Sugarmaker's Companion
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $25.97
Farm-Fresh and Fast
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
The New Cider Makers Handbook
Retail: $44.95
Sale: $29.22
The Art of Fermentation
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $25.97
Home Baked
Retail: $39.95
Sale: $25.97
Mastering Artisan Cheesemaking
Retail: $40.00
Sale: $26.00
Cooking Close to Home
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22

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Socially Responsible Business

Raising Dough
Retail: $19.95
Sale: $12.97
Good Morning, Beautiful Business
Retail: $17.95
Sale: $11.67
Local Dollars, Local Sense
Retail: $17.95
Sale: $11.67
Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money
Retail: $15.95
Sale: $10.37

Green Building

The Greened House Effect
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
No-Regrets Remodeling, Second Edition
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
Compact Living
Retail: $14.95
Sale: $9.72
The Natural Building Companion
Retail: $59.95
Sale: $38.95

Nature and Environment

Out on a Limb
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
The Zero Waste Solution
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
Flying Blind
Retail: $24.95
Sale: $16.22
Cows save the Planet
Retail: $17.95
Sale: $11.67

Politics and Social Justice

Marijuana is Safer, Updated and Expanded Edition
Retail: $14.95
Sale: $9.72
What Then Must We Do?
Retail: $17.95
Sale: $11.67
Slow Democracy
Retail: $19.95
Sale: $12.97
The New Feminist Agenda
Retail: $17.95
Sale: $11.67

Renewable Energy

Reinventing Fire
Retail: $29.95
Sale: $19.47
The Log Book
Retail: $12.95
Sale: $8.42
Do it Yourself 12 Volt Solar Power
Retail: $14.95
Sale: $9.72
Power of the People
Retail: $19.95
Sale: $12.97



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