Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

Think Like a Creek: Using Water to Repair Rivers, Rebuild Floodplains

Let the Water Do the Work is the book that introduced people to the important concept of “thinking like a creek,” or learning how to harness the regenerative power of floods to reshape banks and rebuild floodplains along gullied stream channels.

The Chelsea Green edition of this important book aims to bring its innovative contributions to the field of riparian restoration—including the concept of Induced Meandering—to a wider readership.

Induced Meandering is at once a science, an art, and a philosophy of river restoration; it is an artful blend of the disciplines of geomorphology, hydrology, and ecology that govern channel-forming processes. The river “self-heals” as the growth of native riparian vegetation accelerates the meandering process. Floodplains are essential to the proper functioning of many, but not all, types of rivers—serving as pressure relief valves, escape ramps for rivers swollen by rainfall or melting snows.

Let the Water Do the Work includes sample field charts, diagrams, project outlines, and step-by-step instructions on how to evaluate, implement, monitor and maintain a restoration project. Let the Water Do the Work is on sale for 35% off. But hurry – it only lasts until May 1! Anyone with an interest in natural resource management in these uncertain climatic times should read this book, put these ideas to work, and learn how to go with the flow.

Praise for Let the Water Do the Work

“This book is equally at home in the class as it is in the field, expertly bridging theory and practice throughout. It is a unique contribution that provides students of ecology and resource management with a powerful set of tools to manage what is quickly becoming our most valuable natural resource.”—Craig Conley, PhD, Natural Resource Management, New Mexico Highlands University

“Truly one-stop shopping to tackle a hands-on stream restorative project at almost any scale.”—Owen Hablutzel, Permaculture Whole Systems Design and Holistic Management Certified Educator

“Anyone interested in natural resource management will find this book helpful and thought-provoking.”—Ann Adams, Holistic Management International

 


3 Ways Spraying More Herbicides on Public Land is Bad

The following is a guest post by Tao Orion, author of Beyond the War on Invasive Species. It is an open letter to the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regarding its proposal to add three new herbicides for invasive species management on western public lands. Find out below, how you can voice your concerns […] Read More..

Arid Agriculture: How to Reduce Heat Stress in Crops and Livestock

Regardless of where you stand on the climate change issue, there’s one reality few can deny. During the summer, many places in North America are now regularly suffering temperatures above 100˚F, whereas they rarely did in the past. It’s also widely known that such high temperatures put heat stress on crops that are not very […] Read More..

When it Comes to Invasive Species, Just Say NO to Eradication

What if we looked beyond the notion of invasive species as enemies, and instead harnessed them for beneficial uses? Beyond the War on Invasive Species offers just such a bold alternative to the chemical and intensive eradication efforts, one that is holistic and inspired by permaculture principles. First-time author Tao Orion makes a compelling case […] Read More..

The Limits to Growth and Greece: Systemic or Financial Collapse?

Could it be that the ongoing Greek collapse is a symptom of the more general collapse that the Limits to Growth model generates for the first two decades of the 21st century? Author Ugo Bardi (Extracted: How the Quest for Mineral Wealth is Plundering the Planet) examines the correlation between what is unfolding between Greece […] Read More..

Wild Edibles: 5 Tips for Beginner Foragers

Ever spotted a dandelion growing in your backyard and wondered, can I eat that? According to wild plants expert Katrina Blair, the answer is a resounding yes. And there are plenty of other commonly found weeds that fall into this category as well. In her book The Wild Wisdom of Weeds, Blair introduces readers to […] Read More..