Chelsea Green Publishing

The Moneyless Manifesto

Pages:352 pages
Size: 6 x 9 inch
Publisher:Permanent Publications
Paperback: 9781856231015
Pub. Date August 15, 2013

The Moneyless Manifesto

Live Well, Live Rich, Live Free

By Mark Boyle
Foreword by Charles Eisenstein

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
August 15, 2013

$24.95

That we need money to live, like it or not, is a self-evident truism. Right? Not anymore. Drawing on almost three years of experience as The Moneyless Man, exbusinessman Mark Boyle not only demystifies money and the system that binds us to it, he also explains how liberating, easy, and enjoyable it is to live with less of it.

In The Moneyless Manifesto, Mark takes us on an exploration that goes deeper into the thinking that pushed him to make the decision to go moneyless, and the philosophy he developed along the way.

Bursting with radical new perspectives on some of the vital, yet often unquestioned, pillars of economic theory and what it really means to be “sustainable,” as well as creative and practical solutions for how we can live more with less, Mark offers us one of the world’s most thought-provoking voices on economic and ecological ideas.

Mark’s original, witty style will help simplify and diversify your personal economy, freeing you from the invisible ties that limit you, and making you more resilient to financial shocks. The Moneyless Manifesto will enable you to start your journey into a new world.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Mark Boyle

Mark Boyle became The Moneyless Man in November 2008 when he set out to try living completely without money for twelve months—not spending, earning, saving, or using it. His first book, The Moneyless Man: A Year of Freeconomic Living, was published in June 2010 by Oneworld Publications and documents this journey. Having successfully completed the first year of moneyless living, Mark continued to live moneylessly for almost three years.

Mark is the founder of the Freeconomy movement—which puts people with skills, tools, and time in touch with those with a need for these things, without money changing hands—and blogs at www.justfortheloveofit.org.

As a companion to The Moneyless Manifesto, Mark and others have set up www.moneylessmanifesto.org in order to encourage readers to share their experiences about moneyless living, or moving away from dependence on current cultures around modern economy.

CONNECT WITH THIS AUTHOR

The Moneyless Manifesto's Website

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

You Can Farm

You Can Farm

By Joel Salatin

Have you ever desired, deep within your soul, to make a comfortable full-time living from a farming enterprise? Too often people dare not even vocalize this desire because it seems absurd. It's like thinking the unthinkable.

After all, the farm population is dwindling. It takes too much capital to start. The pay is too low. The working conditions are dusty, smelly and noisy: not the place to raise a family. This is all true, and more, for most farmers.

But for farm entrepreneurs, the opportunities for a farm family business have never been greater. The aging farm population is creating cavernous niches begging to be filled by creative visionaries who will go in dynamic new directions. As the industrial agriculture complex crumbles and our culture clambers for clean food, the countryside beckons anew with profitable farming opportunities.

While this book can be helpful to all farmers, it targets the wannabes, the folks who actually entertain notions of living, loving and learning on a piece of land. Anyone willing to dance with such a dream should be able to assess its assets and liabilities; its fantasies and realities. "Is it really possible for me?" is the burning question this book addresses.






Available in: Paperback

Read More

You Can Farm

Joel Salatin

Paperback $35.00

DIY U

DIY U

By Anya Kamenetz

The price of college tuition has increased more than any other major good or service for the last twenty years. Nine out of ten American high school seniors aspire to go to college, yet the United States has fallen from world leader to only the tenth most educated nation. Almost half of college students don't graduate; those who do have unprecedented levels of federal and private student loan debt, which constitutes a credit bubble similar to the mortgage crisis.

The system particularly fails the first-generation, the low-income, and students of color who predominate in coming generations. What we need to know is changing more quickly than ever, and a rising tide of information threatens to swamp knowledge and wisdom. America cannot regain its economic and cultural leadership with an increasingly ignorant population. Our choice is clear: Radically change the way higher education is delivered, or resign ourselves to never having enough of it.

The roots of the words "university" and "college" both mean community. In the age of constant connectedness and social media, it's time for the monolithic, millennium-old, ivy-covered walls to undergo a phase change into something much lighter, more permeable, and fluid.

The future lies in personal learning networks and paths, learning that blends experiential and digital approaches, and free and open-source educational models. Increasingly, you will decide what, when, where, and with whom you want to learn, and you will learn by doing. The university is the cathedral of modernity and rationality, and with our whole civilization in crisis, we are poised on the brink of Reformation.

Available in: Paperback

Read More

DIY U

Anya Kamenetz

Paperback $14.95

The New Bread Basket

The New Bread Basket

By Amy Halloran

For more than 10,000 years, grains have been the staples of Western civilization. The stored energy of grain allowed our ancestors to shift from nomadic hunting and gathering and build settled communities—even great cities. Though most bread now comes from factory bakeries, the symbolism of wheat and bread—amber waves of grain, the staff of life—still carries great meaning.

Today, bread and beer are once again building community as a new band of farmers, bakers, millers, and maltsters work to reinvent local grain systems. The New Bread Basket tells their stories and reveals the village that stands behind every loaf and every pint.

While eating locally grown crops like heirloom tomatoes has become almost a cliché, grains are late in arriving to local tables, because growing them requires a lot of land and equipment. Milling, malting, and marketing take both tools and cooperation. The New Bread Basket reveals the bones of that cooperation, profiling the seed breeders, agronomists, and grassroots food activists who are collaborating with farmers, millers, bakers, and other local producers. 

Take Andrea and Christian Stanley, a couple who taught themselves the craft of malting and opened the first malthouse in New England in one hundred years. Outside Ithaca, New York, bread from a farmer-miller-baker partnership has become an emblem in the battle against shale gas fracking. And in the Pacific Northwest, people are shifting grain markets from commodity exports to regional feed, food, and alcohol production. Such pioneering grain projects give consumers an alternative to industrial bread and beer, and return their production to a scale that respects people, local communities, and the health of the environment.

Many Americans today avoid gluten and carbohydrates. Yet, our shared history with grains—from the village baker to Wonder Bread—suggests that modern changes in farming and processing could be the real reason that grains have become suspect in popular nutrition. The people profiled in The New Bread Basket are returning to traditional methods like long sourdough fermentations that might address the dietary ills attributed to wheat. Their work and lives make our foundational crops visible, and vital, again.

Available in: Paperback

Read More

The New Bread Basket

Amy Halloran

Paperback $17.95

Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money

Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money

By Woody Tasch

Could there ever be an alternative stock exchange dedicated to slow, small, and local? Could a million American families get their food from CSAs? What if you had to invest 50 percent of your assets within 50 miles of where you live?Such questions-at the heart of slow money-represent the first steps on our path to a new economy.

Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money presents an essential new strategy for investing in local food systems and introduces a group of fiduciary activists who are exploring what should come after industrial finance and industrial agriculture. Theirs is a vision for investing that puts soil fertility into return-on-investment calculations and serves people and place as much at it serves industry sectors and markets.

Leading the charge is Woody Tasch-whose decades of work as a venture capitalist, foundation treasurer, and entrepreneur now shed new light on a truer, more beautiful, more prudent kind of fiduciary responsibility. He offers an alternative vision to the dusty old industrial concepts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries when dollars, and the businesses they financed, lost their connection to place; slow money, on the other hand, is firmly rooted in the new economic, social, and environmental realities of the 21st century.

Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money is a call to action for designing capital markets built around not extraction and consumption but preservation and restoration. Is it a movement or is it an investment strategy? Yes.



Available in: Paperback

Read More

Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money

Woody Tasch, Carlo Petrini

Paperback $15.95