Chelsea Green Publishing

The Man Who Planted Trees

Pages:72 pages
Book Art:Black and white reproductions of original woodcut engravings
Size: 7.5 x 10.25 inch
Publisher:Chelsea Green Publishing
Hardcover: 9781931498722
Pub. Date April 29, 2005
Paperback: 9781933392813
Pub. Date October 17, 2007

The Man Who Planted Trees

By Jean Giono
Illustrated by Michael McCurdy
Foreword by Wangari Maathai
Afterword by Norma Goodrich and Andy Lipkis

Categories:
Nature & Environment

Availability: In Stock

Hardcover

Available Date:
April 29, 2005

$25.00

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
October 17, 2007

$10.00

Twenty years ago Chelsea Green published the first trade edition of The Man Who Planted Trees, a timeless eco-fable about what one person can do to restore the earth. The hero of the story, Elzéard Bouffier, spent his life planting one hundred acorns a day in a desolate, barren section of Provence in the south of France. The result was a total transformation of the landscape-from one devoid of life, with miserable, contentious inhabitants, to one filled with the scent of flowers, the songs of birds, and fresh, flowing water.

Since our first publication, the book has sold over a quarter of a million copies and inspired countless numbers of people around the world to take action and plant trees. On National Arbor Day, April 29, 2005, Chelsea Green released a special twentieth anniversary edition with a new foreword by Wangari Maathai, winner of the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize and founder of the African Green Belt Movement.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jean Giono

Jean Giono (1895-1970), the only son of a cobbler and a laundress, was one of France's greatest writers. He was a pacifist, and he was imprisoned in France for his beliefs during the Second World War. He wrote over thirty novels, scores of short stories, plays, poetry, essays, and filmscripts. Giono won the Prix de Monaco (for the most outstanding collected work by a French writer) among other awards.

ALSO BY THIS AUTHOR

The Man Who Planted Trees

The Man Who Planted Trees

By Jean Giono

We have joined the Paul Winter Consort in the release of a CD version of the acclaimed audio of the story by Jean Giono. The original music was composed and is performed by the Paul Winter consort, and the text is narrated by Robert J. Lurtsema, host of “Morning Pro Musica.”

The hero of the story, Elzéard Bouffier, spent his life planting one hundred acorns a day in a desolate, barren section of Provence in the south of France. The result was a total transformation of the landscape-from one devoid of life, with miserable, contentious inhabitants, to one filled with the scent of flowers, the songs of birds, and fresh, flowing water.

Available in: CD-Audio

Read More

The Man Who Planted Trees

Jean Giono, Robert J. Lurtsema, Paul Winter Consort

CD-Audio $16.00

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