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Slow Money Inaugural National Gathering: From the Ground Up

“Founded by Woody Tasch, a pioneer in merging investing and philanthropy, Slow Money is dedicated to catalyzing the flow of capital to local food systems, while promoting new principles of responsible investing that support sustainable agriculture and the emergence of a restorative economy” (from SlowMoneyAlliance.org) Woody Tasch expanded and explained the Slow Money philosophy in his latest book, Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money: Investing as if Food, Farms, and Fertility Mattered.

To combat the de-localization of money that caused the stock market collapse of 2008, and to try to get communities to reconnect with their food, their soil, their farmers, and their local sustainable businesses, Slow Money puts “nurture capital” (“seed money,” if you will) into business ventures that may not have the fastest or highest rates of return, but which contribute to the stability of a new ethical economy.

The Slow Money Alliance is holding their first annual national gathering in Santa Fe next Thursday and Friday, September 10–11.

Santa Fe Railyard
September 10–11, 2009

Slow Money.  It’s a new economic vision.  It’s an emerging network of investors, donors, farmers, and activists committed to building local food economies.  It’s about the soil of the economy.  It’s the beginning of the “nurture capital” industry.
 
Come to Sante Fe.  Meet thought leaders and change agents from around the country.  Let’s build new capital markets that support preservation and restoration. Let’s fix America’s economy… from the ground up.

You can find all the relevant details here.


Q&A with Kate Raworth about her radical new book, DOUGHNUT ECONOMICS

Q: First things first: Why did you want to write this book? A: I studied economics at university 25 years ago because I wanted to make a difference in the world and believed that economics – the mother tongue of public policy – would best equip me to do that. Instead, its theories left me […] Read More

Slack and Taut: Defining a System’s Resilience

A resilient future (or a resilient present, for that matter) needs to be slack, not taut. What do we mean? Core to the concept of a Lean Economy is understanding the need to move toward a “slack” market rather than one that is “taut.” When British economist David Fleming died unexpectedly in 2010, he left […] Read More

Prehistory of the Next American Revolution

What now? A new Revolution? If we are to counter the dangers both of corporate domination and of traditional forms of socialist statism, decentralization is essential—both of economic institutions and of political structure. We are at a point in our nation’s history that could, decades from now, be taught as the prehistory of the next […] Read More

The Seven-Point Protocol for a Lean Economy

In the future, what will our local economies look like? How will they function if there is little, to no, state or national support? The late David Fleming envisioned a post-capitalistic society that we could call “deep local” — in which all needs are met at the local level — from income to social capital […] Read More

The Six Vital Capitals of the Future

There is an increasing demand on businesses and governments to evaluate their impacts on multiple forms of capital – natural, social, and economic— and this book explains how they can make it happen. The MultiCapital Scorecard’s open-source methodology has been endorsed by the United Nations Environment Program, and it has been shown to help public […] Read More
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