Free Shipping on Orders Over $100*

Green DNC Fueled by Beer

It’s been a few days since the Democratic National Convention in Denver, but we judged this story interesting enough to share with you nonetheless.

The Democratic party went out of their way to make this the greenest convention in history (the 1835 convention notwithstanding). They took a number of steps toward sustainability, from creating a recyclable stage and adopting more energy efficient lighting systems, to awarding the choicest parking spots to hybrid cars and installing 52 solar panels.

But (unsurprisingly?) my favorite part is the beer.

The Democratic National Convention is going to be fueled by more than high spirits and the drama of the upcoming Presidential election in November. It’s going to be powered by real spirits, in the form of beer.

Host city Denver is also home to the Molson Coors Brewing Company (TAP), which happens to be the first domestic brewery to convert waste beer to ethanol. This spring, Molson Coors donated enough clean burning ethanol fuel for 400 General Motors (GM) flex-fuel vehicles (FFVs) that will transport DNC officials, U.S. House and Senate members, state party chairs, delegates, staff and media.

The company can afford the donation. Coors produces about three million gallons of waste beer—suds of substandard quality, or brew lost during packaging—a year. The company says their ethanol helps reduce the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by about seven tons annually.

Now the future looks good for bad beer: General Motors has pledged half of its production line will convert to FFV’s by 2012, a substantial increase from the 11 models it currently produces. And General Motors isn’t the only manufacturer hopping on the ethanol bandwagon. The Ford Taurus (F), Ford Explorer, Chrysler Voyager Minivan, Dodge Ram pickups and Mercedes-Benz C-Class C300 (DAI) are all powered by ethanol, meaning luxury car lovers and minivan mamas can both opt for a greener way to get around.

This different way of energizing your ride can save you money, too. Nationwide, ethanol fueling stations remain less expensive per gallon than gasoline. Visit the National Vehicle Ethanol Coalition to find out if your car qualifies and where to find fuel.

Read the whole article here.

Share This:

Read The Book

Biodiesel

Growing a New Energy Economy, 2nd Edition

$19.95

Recent Articles

A black sign that says community food forest

An Edible Urban Oasis

More than 80 percent of the US population now resides in urban areas. This number is projected to rise in the next few decades. Finding ways to maximize use of existing open space is imperative, and increasing access to food through sustainable management of edible landscaping is one important approach among many that are underway.…

Read More
What is Massive Small?

What is Massive Small?

It’s more than an oxymoron. Massive Small is a framework for urban development that can make cities more sustainable and resilient. But how does it work and does it make sense for the future? The following excerpt is from Making Massive Small Change by Kelvin Campbell. It has been adapted for the web. The Massive Small…

Read More
oil rig

Our History: A Look at Oil, Power, and War

For centuries, humans have had a very strong interest in oil and it’s only getting more intense. Our dependency is reaching a concerning level which Matthieu Auzanneau speaks to in his book Oil, Power, and War. The following article was written by Frank Kaminski and was published on Resilience.org. In Oil, Power, and War, French…

Read More
massive small

Making Massive Small Change

For generations, we’ve worked collectively as a society to build our cities into vibrant communities where we can progress and flourish together. Over the years, however, we’ve lost the art of collective and community evolution as our governments step in with their big ideas for urban growth – many of which come at a steep…

Read More
solar panels

An Update on Passive-Solar Living from James Kachadorian

Not only are Chelsea Green authors experts in their fields, from organic farming to green building, but they’re also part of our extended family. So it’s always nice when we get an update on how things are going! The following note is from James Kachadorian, author of The Passive Solar House. To paraphrase Mark Twain,…

Read More