Chelsea Green Publishing

The Backyard Berry Book

Pages:288 pages
Book Art:Black and white illustrations and charts
Size: 6 x 9 inch
Publisher:Ottographics
Paperback: 9780963452061
Pub. Date April 01, 1995

The Backyard Berry Book

A Hands-On Guide to Growing Berries, Brambles, and Vine Fruit in the Home Garden

Categories:
Farm & Garden

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
April 01, 1995

$17.95

Here's hands-on advice from a professional horticulturist and experienced fruit grower to help gardeners create an edible landscape. The Backyard Berry Book provided all the information that backyard gardeners need to grow strawberries, rhubarb, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, lingonberries, currants, gooseberries, grapes, and kiwi fruit. Includes details on soil nutrition and testing; disease, pest, weed, and bird control; and trellis design. A trouble-shooting section and seasonal activity calendar will help ensure success.

REVIEWS AND PRAISE

"If you're dreaming of harvesting mouth-watering small fruits in your own backyard, ...read this book! If you're already trying small fruit production and harvesting a peck of problems, ...read this book. Stella Otto tells you how to grow the familiar and the more exotic, for big results in a little space." --Jan Riggenbach, columnist Midwest Gardening and Midwest Living magazine

Booklist-
Otto focuses on what she calls small fruit, fruit that does not grow on trees but as a cultivated, perennial crop on small plants, canes, bushes, or vines--strawberries, rhubarbs, brambles (raspberries and blackberries), blueberries, lingonberries, currants, gooseberries, grapes, and kiwi fruit. She begins with a chapter on site selection and preparation, continuing with chapters on plant selection and propagation; berry botany; soil nutrition, photosynthesis, and water; pest control; and diseases. Chapters detailing the growing of these small fruits complete the book, along with troubleshooting questions and answers, a seasonal activity calendar, and a glossary. 

George Cohen

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Stella Otto

Author of the 1994 Benjamin Franklin Award winner, The BackYard Orchardist, Stella Otto has more than sixteen years of hands-on experience in fruit growing. As a horticultural instructor, consultant, and fruit farm owner she has repeatedly faced the questions presented in the Backyard Berry Book and offers practical, realistic solutions.

CONNECT WITH THIS AUTHOR

Stalla's Website

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