Chelsea Green Publishing

How on Earth

Pages:252 pages
Size: 6 x 9 inch
Publisher:Post Growth Publishing
Paperback: 9780990369004
Pub. Date June 08, 2017

How on Earth

Flourishing in a Not-for-Profit World by 2050

Availability: Available for Pre Order

Paperback

Available Date:
June 01, 2017

$19.95

Something incredible is happening within our economy. Beyond the failures of state socialism and the excesses of corporate capitalism, a realistic alternative is emerging. In How on Earth, Donnie Maclurcan and Jennifer Hinton chart the rise of businesses that place purpose ahead of profit, and outline how the advantages these businesses hold in the marketplace pave the way to an entirely different economic system, focused on addressing human need, not greed.

At the heart of this monumental transition lies the changing nature of not-for-profit (NFP) organizations. Contrary to popular notions of non-profit inefficiency, unaccountability, and dependence on donors, the 21st century NFP is proving highly efficient, transparent, and increasingly self-funded.

Distinguishing themselves from B corps and ethical/green shareholder companies by always reinvesting rather than privatizing profits, NFP enterprises around the world are proliferating and succeeding in areas as diverse as construction, manufacturing, software development, food catering, and retail. In a process described by Jeremy Rifkin as ‘the eclipse of capitalism’, many NFP enterprises (including various forms of cooperatives, community interest companies, government-owned corporations, and social businesses) are now outperforming their for-profit counterparts, driven by marked advantages in terms of finance, human resources, productivity, innovation, governance, environmental outcomes, value creation and market reputation. Simultaneously, NFP enterprises are increasingly curbing the excesses that have traditionally been associated with the charitable sector.

Moving beyond the market/state dichotomy, the NFP model finally aligns our economy with the social values that modern science and ancient wisdom agree are central to our shared prosperity. With wealth recirculating through a purpose-driven system, the emerging NFP world economy is better able to serve people and planet, while retaining market dynamics and requiring less taxation and government bureaucracy in the process.

A groundbreaking contribution to economic theory, How on Earth presents the world’s first practical blueprint for the transition to a fairer, thriving economy that offers quality of life for all while respecting our ecological limits.

REVIEWS AND PRAISE

“The concepts developed here go so much deeper and broader than the already profound financial and ecological ramifications. This book strikes at our heart space, reminding us that the human connectivity between us all is what matters most, and that our shared quest for prosperity is dramatically easier when we focus on developing strong businesses that exist to generate communal wealth”--Prof Vijoleta Braach-Maksvytis PhD FAICD, former Head, Office of the Chief Scientist of Australia

How on Earth explains how a thriving economy doesn't have to be based on providing returns to private shareholders and investors. Not-for-profit enterprises are among the most successful and sustainable businesses around. This book is a must-read!”--Linda Wilcox Young, Ph.D., Professor and Chair of Economics, Southern Oregon University

"Combining passion and hard evidence, How on Earth is a fascinating, highly original book. It points to how not-for-profit organizations can play a major role in building a more caring and sustainable economy. It further documents a strong trend in this direction through not-for-profit models that generate revenue that is then invested in caring for people and nature."--Riane Eisler, author of The Real Wealth of Nations: Creating a Caring Economics

"One of the most exciting searches for a sustainable alternative. Nothing else could strike at the very heart of the profit motivea—and all the damage it causes—like this does."--Richard Wilkinson, Author of The Spirit Level and Emeritus Professor of Social Epidemiology at University of Nottingham Medical School

"This is precisely the bold economic thinking that we need!"--Randy Hayes, Rainforest Action Network founder & Director, Foundation Earth

“A cogent, compelling blueprint for building an economy where everyone can thrive without wrecking the planet along the way."--Carl Honoré, Author of In Praise of Slowness

"What would business look like aligned with a just and sustainable planet? This book offers a vision, and more than that, a practical path that people can implement right now."--Charles Eisenstein, Author of Sacred Economics, and The More Beautiful World Our Hearts Know Is Possible

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jennifer Hinton

A social systems designer, Jennifer Hinton is co-director at the Post Growth Institute and teaches sustainability and English in Athens, Greece. Her work has included projects on China’s circular economy, ethanol production in Brazil and Sweden, renewable-energy job creation in Uzbekistan, and lowering the ecological footprint of Greek public schools.

Donnie Maclurcan

An experienced social entrepreneur, Donnie Maclurcan is executive director at the Post Growth Institute and affiliate professor of social science at Southern Oregon University. He is author of Nanotechnology and Global Equality and co-editor of Nanotechnology and Global Sustainability and is currently writing The Not-for-Profit Handbook.

CONNECT WITH THIS AUTHOR

Donnie Maclurcan on PostGrowth.org

AUTHOR VIDEOS

The Not-for-Profit World Our Hearts Know is Possible

The Not-for-Profit World Our Hearts Know is Possible

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Family Friendly Farming

Family Friendly Farming

By Joel Salatin

Saving the landscape, rebuilding entrepreneurial rural families, and protecting nutritious food are the themes of this timeless treatise-hence the word "testament." Delving into the soul of the Salatin family's nationally acclaimed Polyface Farm, author Joel Salatin offers Family Friendly Farming as the key to dealing with resource issues, food policy, and social fabric.

With humor and personal stories, he opens his family and farm convictions for all to see, share, and enjoy. Written from his unabashed "Christian libertarian environmentalist capitalist" perspective, his ideas are guaranteed to encourage and challenge virtually every "ism" in the culture. It will captivate anyone passionate about healing the land, healing families, and healing the food supply.

For several decades young people have been leaving the family farm. The ones left behind are now responsible for society's greatest resources: clean land and clean food. Anyone dedicated to preserving these resources will find in these pages a nongovernmental, self-empowerment approach to environmentalism and food safety.

The heart of this book is aimed toward parents tired of their Dilbert cubicle at the end of the expressway who want to reconnect with their children through a pastoral lifestyle. It's written for anyone who yearns to grow old working with and being adored by value-sharing grandchildren and honored by passionate, productive adult children. Family Friendly Farming can make any family business more viable and any family more functional.

The ten-chapter section on how to get the kids to love the farm is an invaluable addition to any collection of child-rearing manuals. Salatin moves from the family team-building section into a practical discussion on how to increase income per acre and create new, white-collar salaries without buying more land, equipment, or buildings. He deals with the unique and thorny issues surrounding any family business by using his own multi-generational family farm experience as his base for insight and wisdom.

Available in: Paperback

Read More

Family Friendly Farming

Joel Salatin

Paperback $35.00

Bye Bye, Miss American Empire

Bye Bye, Miss American Empire

By Bill Kauffman

It's been almost a century and a half since a critical mass of Americans believed that secession was an American birthright. But breakaway movements large and small are rising up across the nation. From Vermont to Alaska, activists driven by all manner of motives want to form new states-and even new nations.

So, just what's happening out there? The American Empire is dying, says Bill Kauffman in this incisive, eye-opening investigation into modern-day secession-the next radical idea poised to enter mainstream discourse. And those rising up to topple that empire are a surprising mix of conservatives, liberals, regionalists, and independents who-from movement to movement-may share few political beliefs but who have one thing in common: a sense that our nation has grown too large, and too powerfully centralized, to stay true to its founding principles.

Bye Bye, Miss American Empire traces the historical roots of the secessionist spirit, and introduces us to the often radical, sometimes quixotic, and highly charged movements that want to decentralize and re-localize power.

During the George W. Bush administration, frustrated liberals talked secession back to within hailing distance of the margins of national debate, a place it had not occupied since 1861. Now, secessionist voices on the left and right and everywhere in between are amplifying. Writes Kauffman, "The noise is the sweet hum of revolution, of subjects learning how to be citizens, of people shaking off . . . their Wall Street and Pentagon overlords and taking charge of their lives once more."

Engaging, illuminating, even sometimes troubling, Bye Bye, Miss American Empire is a must-read for those taking the pulse of the nation.

Available in: Paperback, eBook

Read More

Bye Bye, Miss American Empire

Bill Kauffman

Paperback $17.95

Systems Thinking For Social Change

Systems Thinking For Social Change

By David Peter Stroh

Donors, leaders of nonprofits, and public policy makers usually have the best of intentions to serve society and improve social conditions. But often their solutions fall far short of what they want to accomplish and what is truly needed. Moreover, the answers they propose and fund often produce the opposite of what they want over time. We end up with temporary shelters that increase homelessness, drug busts that increase drug-related crime, or food aid that increases starvation.

How do these unintended consequences come about and how can we avoid them? By applying conventional thinking to complex social problems, we often perpetuate the very problems we try so hard to solve, but it is possible to think differently, and get different results.

Systems Thinking for Social Change enables readers to contribute more effectively to society by helping them understand what systems thinking is and why it is so important in their work. It also gives concrete guidance on how to incorporate systems thinking in problem solving, decision making, and strategic planning without becoming a technical expert.

Systems thinking leader David Stroh walks readers through techniques he has used to help people improve their efforts to end homelessness, improve public health, strengthen education, design a system for early childhood development, protect child welfare, develop rural economies, facilitate the reentry of formerly incarcerated people into society, resolve identity-based conflicts, and more. 

The result is a highly readable, effective guide to understanding systems and using that knowledge to get the results you want.

Available in: Paperback, eBook

Read More

Systems Thinking For Social Change

David Peter Stroh

Paperback $24.95

Companies We Keep

Companies We Keep

By John Abrams

Part memoir and part examination of a new business model, the 2005 release of The Company We Keep marked the debut of an important new voice in the literature of American business. Now, in Companies We Keep, the revised and expanded edition of his 2005 work, John Abrams further develops his idea that companies flourish when they become centers of interdependence, or “communities of enterprise.”

Thoroughly revised with an expanded focus on employee ownership and workplace democracy, Companies We Keep celebrates the idea that when employees share in the rewards as well as the responsibility for the decisions they make, better decisions result. This is an especially timely topic. Most of the baby boomer generation—the owners of millions of American businesses— will retire within the next two decades. In 2001, 50,000 businesses changed hands. In 2005, that number rose to 350,000. Projections call for 750,000 ownership transitions in 2009. Employee ownership—in both the philosophical and the practical sense—is gathering steam as businesses change hands, and Abrams examines some of the many ways this is done.

Companies We Keep is structured around eight principles—from “Sharing Ownership” and “Cultivating Workplace Democracy” to “Thinking Like Cathedral Builders” and “Committing to the Business of Place”—that Abrams has discovered in the 32 years since he cofounded South Mountain Company on the island of Martha’s Vineyard. Together, these principles reveal communities of enterprise as a potent force of change that can—and will— improve the way Americans do business.

Available in: Paperback, eBook

Read More

Companies We Keep

John Abrams, William Greider

Paperback $24.95