Chelsea Green Publishing

Growing Great Garlic

Pages:228 pages
Book Art:Black and white illustrations and maps
Size: 6 x 9 inch
Publisher:Filaree
Paperback: 9780963085016
Pub. Date November 01, 1991

Growing Great Garlic

The Definitive Guide for Organic Gardeners and Small Farmers

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
November 01, 1991

$16.95

The first garlic book written specifically for organic gardeners and small-scale farmers

Growing Great Garlic is the definitive grower's guide written by a small scale farmer who makes his living growing over 200 strains of garlic. Commercial growers will want to consult this book regularly.

The author tells us:

  • which strains to plant
  • when to fertilize
  • when to plant
  • when to prune flower stalks
  • how to plant
  • when to harvest
    Plus, how to store, market, and process the crop

Growing Great Garlic makes a genuine contribution in the field of garlic classification that will help the public recognize several distinct varietal types of garlic.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ron L. Engeland

For the past fifteen years, author Ron Engeland has farmed organically with his wife, Watershine, and two children in north central Washington state. In addition to garlic they raise over 100 varieties of apples, plus peaches, apricots, plums, raspberries, potatoes, and cut and dried flowers. Ron also manages an irrigation company and writes numerous articles. He is a former state secretary of the Washington Tilth Producers' Cooperative, and served three years on the Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.

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