Chelsea Green Publishing

Devil in the Milk

Pages:240 pages
Book Art:Black and white illustrations
Size: 6 x 9 inch
Publisher:Chelsea Green Publishing
Paperback: 9781603581028
Pub. Date March 06, 2009

Devil in the Milk

Illness, Health and the Politics of A1 and A2 Milk

By Keith Woodford
Foreword by Dr. Thomas Cowan

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
March 06, 2009

$24.95

This groundbreaking work is the first internationally published book to examine the link between a protein in the milk we drink and a range of serious illnesses, including heart disease, Type 1 diabetes, autism, and schizophrenia.

These health problems are linked to a tiny protein fragment that is formed when we digest A1 beta-casein, a milk protein produced by many cows in the United States and northern European countries. Milk that contains A1 beta-casein is commonly known as A1 milk; milk that does not is called A2. All milk was once A2, until a genetic mutation occurred some thousands of years ago in some European cattle. A2 milk remains high in herds in much of Asia, Africa, and parts of Southern Europe. A1 milk is common in the United States, New Zealand, Australia, and Europe.

In Devil in the Milk, Keith Woodford brings together the evidence published in more than 100 scientific papers. He examines the population studies that look at the link between consumption of A1 milk and the incidence of heart disease and Type 1 diabetes; he explains the science that underpins the A1/A2 hypothesis; and he examines the research undertaken with animals and humans. The evidence is compelling: We should be switching to A2 milk.

A2 milk from selected cows is now marketed in parts of the U.S., and it is possible to convert a herd of cows producing A1 milk to cows producing A2 milk.

This is an amazing story, one that is not just about the health issues surrounding A1 milk, but also about how scientific evidence can be molded and withheld by vested interests, and how consumer choices are influenced by the interests of corporate business.



REVIEWS AND PRAISE

"[A] shattering expose of the health problems caused by milk and the efforts of elements in the dairy industry and Government to cover them up."--Jacqueline Steincamp, Healthy Options

"Devil in the Milk is a monumental study, convincingly laid out, and one that demands our immediate attention. . . . If we can use this book to convert our cows to A2 cows, then use the principles of properly fed, properly prepared dairy, we will do much to reduce the disease burden in our country and find our way to the robust health that is our birthright. I encourage everyone to read this book and see for themselves."--Thomas Cowan, MD, from the Foreword

"I believe this is an important book. Critics should think carefully and avoid knee-jerk reactions."--Sir John Scott, Professor Emeritus of Medicine, University of Auckland

"Devil in the Milk is potentially as significant as Carson's Silent Spring or Nader's Unsafe at Any Speed."--Alan Robb, The New Zealand Farmers Weekly



ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Keith Woodford

Keith Woodford is Professor of Farm Management and Agribusiness at Lincoln University in New Zealand. A regular commentator in the news media, he was previously at the University of Queensland (Australia) for 20 years. He lives with his family in Christchurch, New Zealand.

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