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Perennial Vegetables: The Homegrown Evolution Review

Eric Toensmeier‘s award-winning Perennial Vegetables has been introducing gardeners to the underappreciated world of veggie plants that grow all year long since its publication almost two years ago; perennial vegetables require about as much maintenance as the flowers in your perennial beds, with no annual tilling and planting, and range from the familiar (asparagus, rhubarb, artichoke) to the exotic (ground cherry, ramps, goji berries).

The fine urban gardeners at Homegrown Evolution recently checked out, and wrote about, Eric’s book on their website. From Homegrown Evolution:

For lazy gardeners such as ourselves nothing beats perennial vegetables. Plant ’em once and you’ve got food for years. For novice gardeners, perennials are plants that, unlike say broccoli (an “annual”), don’t need to be replanted every spring. The best known perennial vegetable in the west is probably asparagus which, given the right conditions, will produce fresh stalks for years. But there are many thousands more perennials little known to North American gardeners that are a lot easier to grow than fussy asparagus.

Unfortunately, there used to be a lack of information about edible perennials until the publication of Eric Toensmeier’s excellent book, Perennial Vegetables: From Artichokes to Zuiki Taro, A Gardener’s Guide to Over 100 Delicious and Easy to Grow Edibles. We’ve got a few of the species Toensmeier mentions: artichoke, prickly pear cactus, stinging nettles, crosnes (more on those in another post) and goji berries. Edible Perennials contains growing information for each species offering something for every climate in North America.

Read the whole review here.

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