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Posts Tagged ‘sustainability’

How to Find Success as a New Farmer

Farmer standing in front of a tractor in a field

As the average age of America’s farmers continues to rise, we face serious questions about what farming will look like in the near future, and who will be growing our food. Many younger people are interested in going into agriculture, especially organic farming, but cannot find affordable land, or lack the conceptual framework and practical…

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Subsistence First: Strategies for the Long Haul

Illustration of grassy hills and farmland

Peasants, indigenous agriculturalists, and old-time American farming families farmed first and foremost to feed their own families and those in need in their communities—only secondarily, if at all, for a market. They may have practiced shifting agriculture or were settled permanently in villages; they may have been members of free, “primitive” or “tribal” societies, or…

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Becoming Resilient in an Ever-Changing World

sheep looking out on farm

One of the most important skills to have in life is to be able to adapt to the changes that come your way. Being resilient sets you up to succeed with any challenges that may arise, but it’s not always an easy task. However, if you follow a few simple guidelines you can better prepare…

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Go Lean: Ten Types of Farm Waste

farmer picking vegetables

Spring cleaning is a big deal for those who want to get rid of unnecessary clutter. People get rid of everything from old furniture to clothes and games. However, this doesn’t only apply to households–farms also have a lot of waste to get rid of that isn’t strictly food scraps or broken tractor parts. But…

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Perennial Power: Why You Need Them in Your Garden

ben falk gardening

Keeping up with a garden can be a lot of work—especially when you start planning for the upcoming season. Luckily, there’s a secret (okay, maybe not so secret) weapon you can use to take away some of your stress! Perennials are the perfect addition to any garden and the best part is you only have…

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Who Are We as Farmers?

farmland with hay

Recently, farmers have been making the headlines because of the hardships they’re facing to sustain their farms. With larger, corporate farms running smaller, privately-owned farms out of business, it seems like many farmers are fighting an uphill battle. But, despite the small amount of money, long hours, and constant threats from the “big guys” farmers…

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The Evolution of Earth, Humans, and Our Natural Resources

power plant

We have long been taught that evolution is a process that occurs gradually over millions of years, that change happens slowly without much attention. We’ve come to learn that in reality, evolution happens in fits and starts — very slowly for long periods, then in sudden spurts of rapid change. It may be triggered by…

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Chelsea Green Publishing: A Year In Review

Chelsea Green 2018 Blog in Review

It’s been quite the year here at Chelsea Green! We opened our first international office in London, England, launched a brand new website, published a ton of amazing books, welcomed new Grasshoppers to the team, and so much more! Grab a cuppa, settle in, and join us as we look back on what a great…

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8 Must-Read Books for Your 2019 Reading List

staff picks

Are you new to the Chelsea Green community and aren’t sure which book to read first? Or maybe you’re a long-time fan and want to continue your binge-reading but need some fresh ideas. Regardless of how you got here, we can help! From the enlightening and thought-provoking to the quirky and fun, we, the Chelsea…

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Preparing for Winter: Weatherproofing Your Windows

windows

If thinking about the cost to heat your home this winter has you knitting wool mittens and piling on another layer of blankets, you’re not alone. But did you know that a large majority of that hefty bill comes as a result of poor energy efficiency? If you have older windows it’s likely that air…

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Resiliency: Becoming an Adaptive Human

home garden

They say history is bound to repeat itself if we don’t take the time to learn from the past. Our decision-making skills are essential for survival but, for some, it’s difficult to connect the dots between the cause and effect of said decisions. However, in this day and age, it’s important to recognize our strengths,…

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How The Great Migration Led to Urban Farming

youth group

For centuries, humans have been migrating in search of better land, opportunities, and quality of life. For some, those migrations were voluntary while others were forced to move due to far more sinister circumstances. The Great Migration is one such case. During the 1900’s through 1970, over six million black people left the rural south…

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Prepping 101: Everything You Need for a Grab-n-Go Survival Kit

survival kit

We know a lot of people are wondering what’s coming next in the US, as well as the world, given terrorism, politics, and global warming, among other threats. Given the uncertainty, it doesn’t hurt to be prepared at all times. This 72-hour survival kit will help with any initial emergencies and includes medicine, water cleaning…

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A 15-Point Urban Food Manifesto

urban farming

What if farms and food production were integrated into every aspect of urban living—from special assessments to create new farms and food businesses to teaching people how to grow fruits and vegetables so farmers can focus on staple crops. Urban farming is a story of recovery, of land and food, of people, and of the…

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Lessons in Resilience: How to Plan a Successful Farm Business

business planning

Humans are extremely resilient beings. We have the capability to create wondrous things out of seemingly nothing and continuously reinvent ourselves. However, when the world is against us, it may seem impossible to accomplish our goals. Leah Penniman, co-founder of Soul Fire Farm, wanted nothing more than to be able to provide nourishing food for…

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The 20 Rules of Slow Democracy

crowd

As millions of people head to the polls today to cast their vote, we got to thinking about the idea of democracy and how we need it now more than ever before. But what does democracy look like now and do we need to rethink it? Reconnecting with the sources of decisions that affect us,…

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A Cluckin’ Good Time: Why Chickens Rule the Roost

chickens

If you’ve ever wondered what your life is missing, the answer is probably chickens. These feathery friends can help fertilize your soil, mow your lawn, and even lay the eggs you eat for breakfast. What could be better than that? To celebrate our favorite member of the poultry flock we’ve rounded up some wisdom and…

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How to End a Food Apartheid

fistbump

Apartheid ended in 1994, right? Not according to Leah Penniman, a young, black farmer living in the South End of Albany, NY where a modern day apartheid is taking place. At the root of this issue? Food. Or better said, the lack of access to affordable, healthy food options in Black communities across the country…

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Emergence of the Mechanical Mind and Its Dire Implications

tractor in field

For as far back as we can remember, humans have been driven by the Mechanical Mind – a desire to evolve, to expand, to consume, to manipulate everything around them to meet their needs without thinking about the consequences. Yet some 200,000 years ago, before the advent of agriculture, there was a different view and…

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Radical Thinking for 21st-Century Economists

doughnut economics

The economy is a complex, evolving system, and that’s an empowering thought: it means that every one of us can play a part in shaping its evolution. When it comes to understanding economics you may be familiar with classic texts like Adam Smith’s, but don’t view that as the be-all-end-all, lest you get stuck in…

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Don’t Wear a Straw Hat: A Q&A with Mike Madison

farm

In the following Q&A, Mike Madison, author of Fruitful Labor, reflects on over three decades of organic farming, talks about what it means to be sustainable, and offers advice and optimism for young farmers. Looking for even more insight?  Check out our other posts on Fruitful Labor: Profit or Loss from Farming A Farm is…

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Seven Ways to Think Like a Twenty-First-Century Economist

doughnut economics

We’ve come a long way since the days of horse-drawn buggies and telegrams: We can send messages to someone across the globe in seconds, travel overseas takes hours not days, and yet, when it comes to how we think about the economy, we’re centuries behind the times. Renegade economist, Kate Raworth, proposes an entirely new…

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What Is “Good” Silvopasture Grazing?

sheep and goats

If you’re not familiar with silvopasture, you should be. The integrated system, which combines aspects of forestry, animal husbandry, grazing, and ecology, offers both the promise of land regeneration and economic livelihood. In order to succeed, however, you need to understand a key component of the system: the art of grazing. While it may seem…

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What is a Community Food Forest?

two people gardening

The recent rise of community food forests and similar projects have come at an imperative time. More than 80 percent of the US population now resides in urban areas. This number is projected to rise in the next few decades. Not only can food forests provide a local source of food they can also serve…

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Mushroom Adventures: Mushroom Composting and Recycling

bucket of mushrooms

In the United States, an average of 35 percent of home waste and 60 percent of business waste is suitable for use as a mushroom growing substrate. Mushrooms can be grown on toilet and paper towel rolls, egg cartons, newspapers, magazines, coffee grounds, tea bags, old cotton clothing, tissue boxes, shredded paper, cardboard boxes, and more.…

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