Chelsea Green Publishing

The Wildcrafting Brewer

Pages:304 pages
Book Art:Full-color photographs throughout
Size: 7 x 10 inch
Publisher:Chelsea Green Publishing
Paperback: 9781603587181
Pub. Date February 12, 2018

The Wildcrafting Brewer

Creating Unique Drinks and Boozy Concoctions from Nature's Ingredients

Categories:
Food & Drink

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
February 12, 2018

$29.95 $22.46

Primitive beers, country wines, herbal meads, natural sodas, and more

The art of brewing doesn’t stop at the usual ingredients: barley, hops, yeast, and water. In fact, the origins of brewing involve a whole galaxy of wild and cultivated plants, fruits, berries, and other natural materials, which were once used to make a whole spectrum of creative, fermented drinks.

Now fermentation fans and home brewers can rediscover these “primitive” drinks and their unique flavors in The Wildcrafting Brewer. Wild-plant expert and forager Pascal Baudar’s first book, The New Wildcrafted Cuisine, opened up a whole new world of possibilities for readers wishing to explore and capture the flavors of their local terroir. The Wildcrafting Brewer does the same for fermented drinks. Baudar reveals both the underlying philosophy and the practical techniques for making your own delicious concoctions, from simple wild sodas, to non-grape-based “country wines,” to primitive herbal beers, meads, and traditional ethnic ferments like tiswin and kvass.

The book opens with a retrospective of plant-based brewing and ancient beers. The author then goes on to describe both hot and cold brewing methods and provides lots of interesting recipes; mugwort beer, horehound beer, and manzanita cider are just a few of the many drinks represented. Baudar is quick to point out that these recipes serve mainly as a touchstone for readers, who can then use the information and techniques he provides to create their own brews, using their own local ingredients.

The Wildcrafting Brewer will attract herbalists, foragers, natural-foodies, and chefs alike with the author’s playful and relaxed philosophy. Readers will find themselves surprised by how easy making your own natural drinks can be, and will be inspired, again, by the abundance of nature all around them.

REVIEWS AND PRAISE

“Pascal Baudar takes wild fermentation to the next level with wild plants, wild yeasts, and wild bacteria. His methods are effective, and his creativity is infectious. With gorgeous photos and clear technical details, this book will be a source of great inspiration.”—Sandor Ellix Katz, author of Wild Fermentation and The Art of Fermentation

“Owning one of Pascal Baudar’s books is like possessing a key to the foraging kingdom—a key that opens the door to his unique approach to working with wild ingredients. Over the years, Baudar has developed an original culinary language of the land, working and exploring every element of terroir from salt and stones to insect sugars and plants. His methods are rigorously researched, and his piercing creativity and spirit of enquiry gives them life. The foraging world owes a great deal to Baudar’s original research and generous spirit of sharing.”—Marie Viljoen, urban forager and author of 66 Square Feet

“Pascal Baudar has elevated the concept of terroir—that intricate symbiosis of Homo imbibens, native biota, microorganisms, and landscape—into the realm of extreme beverages, both fermented and unfermented. His book brings to life the innovative quest of the Palaeolithic shaman/healer/brewer.”—Patrick E. McGovern, archaeologist and author of Ancient Brews and Uncorking the Past

“Pascal’s new book offers a wonderfully tangential and unrestrained approach to the world of home brewing by mixing foraging with wild booze alchemy and encouraging the reader to experiment, explore, and play. Whilst managing to make both topics fun and accessible, a comprehensive introduction leads to some delightfully simple recipes and plenty of great ideas, all complemented by beautiful photography.”—John Rensten, founder of Forage London and author of The Edible City

“Pascal Baudar eliminates the boundaries set by modern homebrewing "rules" and encourages brewers to go wild with creativity. Not only does he present simple guidelines for making truly unique brews that blur the lines between wine, beer, mead, and soda, but he provides readers with knowledge on how to brew with ingredients they likely already have access to in their kitchens, gardens, yards, and wildlands.”—Jereme Zimmerman, author of Make Mead Like a Viking

“I wish I’d had The Wildcrafting Brewer years ago when I became obsessed with plant-forward, foraged, alcohol fermentation. Though often overlooked in contemporary brewing, Pascal Baudar focuses on the basics of foraging and alternative sugar sources. At once looking to indigenous history as well as reviving, or creating, innovative techniques, Pascal encourages people to get their hands dirty, fermenting with what is around them rather than worrying first about fancy tools.”—Pete Halupka, Harvest Roots Ferments

“I admire the foraging practice Pascal Baudar shares in The Wildcrafting Brewer—hiking into nature and gathering what's prevalent to create a fermented mélange that carries the terroir of those moments he spent forest bathing, beachcombing, or urban scavenging. The season, the scents, the scenery—all imprinted into his bubbly brews. It inspires me to cleanse my aura with a sage cider cocktail and offer a libation of Achillea and Artemisia to the folks, like Baudar, who keep the spirited plant traditions going. This is a great reference book for both the herbalist’s kitchen and the botanist’s bar.”—Jessyloo Rodrigues, herbalist and cocktail farmer

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Pascal Baudar

Pascal Baudar is the author of The Wildcrafting Brewer and The New Wildcrafted Cuisine. He works as a wild-food researcher, wild brewer, and instructor in traditional food preservation techniques. Over the years, through his weekly classes and seminars, he has introduced thousands of home cooks, local chefs, and foodies to the flavors offered by their wild landscapes.

In 2014, Baudar was named one of the 25 most influential local tastemakers by Los Angeles Magazine, and in 2017 his instructional programs, taught through Urban Outdoor Skills, were named one of the seven most creative cooking classes in the L.A. region.

ALSO BY THIS AUTHOR

The New Wildcrafted Cuisine

The New Wildcrafted Cuisine

By Pascal Baudar

With detailed recipes for ferments, infusions, spices, and other preparations

Wild foods are increasingly popular, as evidenced by the number of new books about identifying plants and foraging ingredients, as well as those written by chefs about culinary creations that incorporate wild ingredients (Noma, Faviken, Quay, Manreza, et al.). The New Wildcrafted Cuisine, however, goes well beyond both of these genres to deeply explore the flavors of local terroir, combining the research and knowledge of plants and landscape that chefs often lack with the fascinating and innovative techniques of a master food preserver and self-described “culinary alchemist.”

Author Pascal Baudar views his home terrain of southern California (mountain, desert, chaparral, and seashore) as a culinary playground, full of wild plants and other edible and delicious foods (even insects) that once were gathered and used by native peoples but that have only recently begun to be re-explored and appreciated.

For instance, he uses various barks to make smoked vinegars, and combines ants, plants, and insect sugar to brew primitive beers. Stems of aromatic plants are used to make skewers. Selected rocks become grinding stones, griddles, or plates. Even fallen leaves and other natural materials from the forest floor can be utilized to impart a truly local flavor to meats and vegetables, one that captures and expresses the essence of season and place.

This beautifully photographed book offers up dozens of creative recipes and instructions for preparing a pantry full of preserved foods, including Pickled Acorns, White Sage-Lime Cider, Wild Kimchi Spice, Currant Capers, Infused Salts with Wild Herbs, Pine Needles Vinegar, and many more. And though the author’s own palette of wild foods are mostly common to southern California, readers everywhere can apply Baudar’s deep foraging wisdom and experience to explore their own bioregions and find an astonishing array of plants and other materials that can be used in their own kitchens.

The New Wildcrafted Cuisine is an extraordinary book by a passionate and committed student of nature, one that will inspire both chefs and adventurous eaters to get creative with their own local landscapes.

Available in: Hardcover

Read More

The New Wildcrafted Cuisine

Pascal Baudar

Hardcover $40.00

AUTHOR VIDEOS

California Foraging: San Gabrielino

California Foraging: San Gabrielino

California Foraging: Hahamongna

California Foraging: Hahamongna

California Foraging: Hahamongna

California Foraging: Hahamongna

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