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Raw Milk Debate Heats Up

Even in the face of a government propaganda campaign based largely on questionable lab test results, anecdotal evidence, and ingrained prejudices in favor of pasteurization, the underground food movement to make nutritionally-dense raw milk available to more consumers is gaining steam.

Chronic illnesses like asthma, allergies, and diabetes are on the rise. Advocates believe that raw milk, as part of a back-to-basics whole foods diet, can help reverse the decline in Americans’ health. And their numbers are only growing.

USA Today chronicles some of the trends:

Efforts to tighten or loosen sales restrictions on raw milk have been underway this year in several states, including:

• Maryland. A bill to legalize raw milk sales has been under consideration since February.

• Texas. The state health department recently lost a bid to tighten raw milk sales regulations.

• Connecticut. After the state health department traced an E. coli outbreak to raw milk in 2008, a bill was introduced to rescind farmers’ rights to sell raw milk in stores. The bill died in committee after a February hearing.

• Wisconsin. Raw milk supporters recently hired a lobbyist to try to amend state law to allow raw milk sales, according to a state report.

Although no official industry statistics are kept on sales of raw milk, advocates of raw milk, such as the Weston A. Price Foundation, say more consumers want the choice.

Demand for raw milk “is rapidly growing,” says Sally Fallon Morell, president of the foundation.

Mark McAfee, owner of the Organic Pastures raw milk dairy in Fresno, Calif., calls the raw milk campaign an “out-of-control grass-roots movement.” In less than 10 years he says, he has expanded to serve 50,000 to 60,000 people a week.

Read the whole article here.

 

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