Free Shipping on Orders Over $100*

Ten Facts About the Water We Waste

As the globe’s temperature rises and the earth’s weather patterns go haywire, water is quickly becoming a hot topic in the US and elsewhere. Floods are sweeping through new areas, while others are drying out faster than ever. We’ve long had the luxury of holding a cavalier attitude about the water we use, and more often than not that attitude has led us to unnecessary waste and pollution of our water.

Jon Clift and Amanda Cuthbert, authors of Water: Use Less—Save More, have assembled some facts about our water use that may surprise you.

From Water: Use Less—Save More:

  1. Americans now use 127 percent more water than we did in 1950.

  2. About 95 percent of the water entering our homes goes down the drain.

  3. Running the tap while brushing your teeth can waste 4 gallons of water.

  4. Older toilets can use 3 gallons of clean water with every flush, while new toilets use as little as 1 gallon.

  5. Leaky faucets that drip at the rate of one drop per second can waste up to 2,700 gallons of water each year.

  6. A garden hose or sprinkler can use almost as much water in an hour as an average family of four uses in one day.

  7. A water-efficient dishwasher will use as little a 4 gallons per wash cycle, whereas some older models use up to 13 gallons per cycle.

  8. Some experts estimate that more than 50 percent of landscape water use goes to waste due to evaporation or runoff caused by over-watering.

  9. Many people in the world exist on 3 gallons of water per day or less. We can use that amount in one flush of the toilet.

  10. Over a quarter of all the clean, drinkable water you use in your home is used to flush the toilets.

 

For tips on how to reduce the amount of water you use and waste, see Water: Use Less—Save More, by Jon Clift and Amanda Cuthbert.

Share This:

Recent Articles

air shot of farming village

Farming for the Long Haul: It Takes a Village

It’s almost impossible to be a successful community without a group of caretakers behind the scenes, making sure everyone’s needs are met. For hundreds of years, women made up these “caring communities,” supporting families, making food, and bettering community life. Though the makeup of these caring communities has changed over the years, the support provided…

Read More
compost in a community garden

The Phases of Composting

Although the stages of composting are very closely intertwined, each separate one has its own value and needs to be nurtured accordingly. The materials used go through several transformations: physical, biological, and chemical. Understanding each phase of this process is the first step in creating the best nutrients for your plants. The following is an…

Read More
Tractor clearing a field

The “American Farmer” Fallacy

For those who aren’t in the know, it may seem like all farmers are created equal, but that’s simply not the case. In fact, there is such a wide variety of farmers that it’s nearly impossible to put a label on them. But that doesn’t stop organizations from trying. The following is an excerpt from…

Read More

Black Land Matters

As a young black girl, Leah Penniman struggled to understand who she was and where she fit in with the world. There was one thing she did know – when she was connected to the earth she felt at home. But what did that mean? Was the land trying to tell her something about who…

Read More
farmland with hay

Who Are We as Farmers?

Recently, farmers have been making the headlines because of the hardships they’re facing to sustain their farms. With larger, corporate farms running smaller, privately-owned farms out of business, it seems like many farmers are fighting an uphill battle. But, despite the small amount of money, long hours, and constant threats from the “big guys” farmers…

Read More