Chelsea Green Publishing

The Permaculture Book of DIY

Pages:176 pages
Book Art:Full-color photographs and illustrations throughout
Size: 5.5 x 8.5 inch
Publisher:Permanent Publications
Paperback: 9781856232715
Pub. Date December 23, 2016

The Permaculture Book of DIY

By John Adams
Contributions by Mike Abbott, Stuart Anderson, Jamie Ash, Simon Mitchell, Chris Southall, Alicia Taylor and Peter Willis

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
December 23, 2016

$19.95

Permaculture is a low cost, environmental and creative approach to living. The Permaculture Book of DIY presents over 20 practical projects that show you how to cleverly recycle materials into useful and unique objects at low financial and environmental cost. Some projects can even be completed for free.

Want to spend more time enjoying your home and garden? With this diverse range of projects you could be growing vegetables in your own geodesic growdome, relaxing on a recycled wooden pallet garden bench whilst enjoying a cider from your very own cider press, or generating your own power with a self-installed solar panel!

Each project has been carefully tried and tested and is clearly laid out with step–by–step instructions and supporting photography and diagrams. It is suitable for anyone who wants to learn DIY skills, have fun and involve their kids too.

Learn how to make your own:

  • Solar food dryer
  • Self-watering raised bed
  • Pallet furniture
  • Wood-fired pizza oven
  • Rocket stove hot tub
  • and much more!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

John Adams

Permaculture magazine has been in print since 1992, during which time John Adams has been writing articles about his various DIY projects. This is a collection of his most popular projects plus a selection of our favorite readers’ DIY submissions.

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