Chelsea Green Publishing

The Farmer and the Grill

Pages:164 pages
Book Art:Black and white illustrations
Size: 6 x 9 inch
Publisher:Left to Write Press
Paperback: 9780979439100
Pub. Date April 15, 2008

The Farmer and the Grill

A Guide to Grilling, Barbecuing and Spit-Roasting Grassfed Meat...and for Saving the Planet one Bite at a Time

By Shannon Hayes
Foreword by Joel Salatin

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
April 15, 2008

$21.95

The Farmer and the Grill is filled with recipes specially devised to bring out the best in nutritious, Earth-friendly, pasture-raised meats.

In her first book, The Grassfed Gourmet Cookbook, author and livestock farmer Shannon Hayes introduced a radically simple concept: sustainable practices like pastured-based farming translate into food that is tastier, healthier, and better for both people and the planet.

The key to getting the most out of pasture-raised meats, though, is understanding how to cook them properly. In The Farmer and the Grill, Hayes offers useful tips on grilling, barbecuing, and spit-roasting all cuts of pasture-raised meats: beef, lamb, pork, and poultry. Dozens of simple, straightforward recipes provide all the basic cooking instructions, plus directions on how to make a variety of herb rubs, marinades, and barbecue sauces to accompany the meats. Traditional techniques such as Southern barbecue and Argentine-style asado cooking will help readers grill like the pros. And specific notes from pasture-based farmers on dealing with natural variations in grassfed meats will ensure success every time.

Creative and mouth-watering recipes include Tamari-Orange Whiskey Kebabs, Grilled Steaks in a Cilantro-Olive Paste, and Rack of Lamb with a Spiced Fig Crust. Plus, special sidebars on choosing meats, basic cooking techniques, and other topics mean that socially conscious cooks will gain a real understanding of grassfed meat and why it is starting to occupy a central place on the American dinner plate.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Shannon Hayes

Shannon Hayes works with her family raising grassfed meat on Sap Bush Hollow Farm in upstate New York. She is the author of Long Way on a Little, The Grassfed Gourmet, The Farmer and the Grill and the controversial best-seller, Radical Homemakers. Hayes holds a Ph.D. in sustainable agriculture and community development from Cornell University, blogs for Yes! Magazine, hosts GrassfedCooking.com, and writes about her daily life farming, homeschooling her kids and cooking great food at ShannonHayes.info.

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The Sheer Ecstasy of Being a Lunatic Farmer

The Sheer Ecstasy of Being a Lunatic Farmer

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Foodies and environmentally minded folks often struggle to understand and articulate the fundamental differences between the farming and food systems they endorse and those promoted by Monsanto and friends. With visceral stories and humor from Salatin's half-century as a "lunatic" farmer, Salatin contrasts the differences on many levels: practical, spiritual, social, economic, ecological, political, and nutritional.

In today's conventional food-production paradigm, any farm that is open-sourced, compost-fertilized, pasture-based, portably-infrastructured, solar-driven, multi-speciated, heavily peopled, and soil-building must be operated by a lunatic. Modern, normal, reasonable farmers erect "No Trespassing" signs, deplete soil, worship annuals, apply petroleum-based chemicals, produce only one commodity, erect Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations, and discourage young people from farming.

Anyone looking for ammunition to defend a more localized, solar-driven, diversified food system will find an entire arsenal in these pages. With wit and humor honed during countless hours working on the farm he loves, and then interacting with conventional naysayers, Salatin brings the land to life, farming to sacredness, and food to ministry.

Divided into four main sections, the first deals with principles to nurture the earth, an idea mainline farming has never really endorsed. The second section describes food and fiber production, including the notion that most farmers don't care about nutrient density or taste because all they want is shipability and volume. The third section, titled "Respect for Life," presents an apologetic for food sacredness and farming as a healing ministry. Only lunatics would want less machinery and pathogenicity. Oh, the ecstasy of not using drugs or paying bankers. How sad. The final section deals with promoting community, including the notion that more farmers would be a good thing.

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Holy Cows and Hog Heaven is written by an honest-to-goodness-dirt-under-the-fingernails, optimistic clean good farmer. His goal is to:

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Long Way on a Little

Long Way on a Little

By Shannon Hayes

"Every earth-conscious home cook who wishes to nourish his or her family with sustainable, local, grassfed and pastured meats should be able to do so, regardless of income," argues Shannon Hayes, "we just have to change how we're eating." In her largest, most comprehensive volume to-date, North America's leading authority on grassfed meat examines the conundrum of maintaining a healthy, affordable and ecologically sound meat-based diet, while simultaneously paying America's small sustainable farmers a fair price for their food. "But to do it," she adds, "we need to expand our menus to include more than just the prime cuts, and we need to learn how to work with leftovers."

More than just a cookbook, Long Way on a Little presents Hayes' practical knowledge about integrating livestock into a sustainable society with her accessible writing and engaging wit. Designed to be the only meat book a home cook could ever need, Long Way on a Little is packed with Hayes' signature delicious no-fail recipes for perfect roasts and steaks cooked indoors and out on the grill, easy-to-follow techniques to make use of the less-conventional, inexpensive cuts that often go to waste, tips on stretching a sustainable food budget, and an extensive section on using leftovers and creating soups; all with the aim of helping home cooks make the most effective and economical use of their local farm products or their own backyard livestock.

While addressing the topic of making local food more affordable, Hayes also frankly grapples with tough health issues confronting so many Americans today, from diabetes to grain and gluten intolerance. The result is a family-pleasing, nutrient-dense, affordable cuisine that is a joy to prepare, rich in authentic flavor, and steeped in the wisdom of the world's greatest culinary traditions, all bundled together in a thought-provoking and informative book that is as stimulating to the mind as it is to the palate. Features include:

  • Recipes for cooking all major cuts of grassfed and pastured meats indoors and out on the grill
  • Carbohydrate counts on all recipes for low carb and diabetic diets
  • Guide to grain-free, legume-free, dairy-free and paleo-friendly recipes
  • Recipes for using animal fats in traditional cuisine, as well as for soaps, salves and candle-making
  • 16 page full-color insert illustrating fundamental techniques for working with whole animals: from making broth and demi-glace, grilling steaks and cutting up chickens, to rendering fat and soap, salve and candle making
  • Extensive section on soups and leftovers
  • Lively, up-to-date discussions of current issues pertaining to sustainable livestock farming in North America
  • Money-saving tips for making delicious meals go as far as possible

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Salad Bar Beef

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In a day when beef is assailed by many environmental organizations and lauded by fast-food chains, a new paradigm to bring reason to this confusion is in order. With farmers leaving the land in droves and plows poised to "reclaim" set-aside acres, it is time to offer an alternative that is both land and farmer friendly.

Beyond that, the salad bar beef production model offers hope to rural communities, to struggling row-crop farmers, and to frustrated beef eaters who do not want to encourage desertification, air and water pollution, environmental degradation and inhumane animal treatment. Because this is a program weighted toward creativity, management, entrepreneurism and observation, it breathes fresh air into farm economics.

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