Chelsea Green Publishing

Sustainable Food

Pages:96 pages
Book Art:Full-color illustrations throughout
Size: 4.75 x 6.5 inch
Publisher:Chelsea Green Publishing
Paperback: 9781603581417
Pub. Date September 15, 2009

Sustainable Food

How to Buy Right and Spend Less

Categories:
Food & Drink

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
September 15, 2009

$7.95

Wondering whether it’s worth it to splurge on the locally raised beef? What about those organic carrots? New in the Chelsea Green Guides series, Sustainable Food: How to Buy Right and Spend Less helps the average shopper navigate the choices, whether strolling the aisles of a modern supermarket or foraging at a local farmers market.

This down-to-earth, casual guide—small enough to be slipped into your pocket—answers these and other questions for the shopper:

  • What are the differences among organic, local, fair-trade, free-range, naturally raised, and biodynamic foods?
  • How affordable is it to subscribe to a CSA farm—and what are the advantages?
  • Is it better to choose wild Alaskan salmon at $18.99, or the Chilean farmed fish at $11.99?
  • What cooking oils can be sustainably sourced?
  • How can a food co-op increase access to, and affordability of, healthier, Earth-friendly foods?
  • Where can you find sustainably produced sugar, and are there any local replacements for sweeteners from faraway lands?
  • What do the distinctions between shade-grown and trellised coffee mean?
  • Is shark okay to eat? How about mackerel?
  • Why is the war on plastic bags so important?

Sustainable eating just got easier.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Elise McDonough

Elise McDonough trained at New York City's Natural Gourmet Institute, but her informal training in counterculture cuisine began at the Cleveland Food Co-op, where she was initiated into the world of food politics, strange ingredients, and alternative diets. She lives in New York, where she volunteers at the Union Square Greenmarket, and is actively involved in many local farm and food issues.

AUTHOR VIDEOS

Elise McDonough Explains Sustainable Food from an NYC Farmers' Market

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