Chelsea Green Publishing

Strangers Devour the Land

Pages:376 pages
Book Art:Black and white photos and maps
Size: 6 x 9 inch
Publisher:Chelsea Green Publishing
Paperback: 9781603580045
Pub. Date April 15, 2008

Strangers Devour the Land

By Boyce Richardson
Foreword by Winona LaDuke

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
April 15, 2008

$25.00

First published in 1974, Strangers Devour the Land is recognized as the magnum opus among the numerous books, articles, and films produced by Boyce Richardson over two decades on the subject of indigenous people. Its subject, the long struggle of the Crees of James Bay in northern Quebec—a hunting and trapping people—to defend the territories they have occupied since time immemorial, came to international attention in 1972 when they tried by legal action to stop the immense hydro-electric project the provincial government was proposing to build around them.

The Crees argued that the integrity of their vast wilderness was essential to their way of life, but the authorities dismissed such claims out of hand. Richardson, who sat through many months of the trial, mingles the scientific and Cree testimony given in court with his own interviews of Cree hunters, and experiences in gathering information and shooting films, to produce a classic tale of cultures in collision.

In a new preface, he reveals that the Crees—now receiving immense sums of money as compensation for the loss of their lands—appear to be doing well, and to be in the process of joining modern, technological culture, while retaining the spiritual base of their traditional lives. Meanwhile, Hydro-Quebec continues to eye additional rivers on the Cree’s lands for new dams.

REVIEWS AND PRAISE

"A tour-de-force of sensitive, perceptive, and impassioned reporting.... Read it and rage!"--Farley Mowat

"Richardson's book is, in a sense, a memorial to the Cree culture.... The cumulative effect of his narrative is powerful."--The Globe and Mail




"Richardson delivers a stunning parable of dissimilar societies on a collision course... It must not be ignored."--The Philadelphia Inquirer

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Boyce Richardson

Born in New Zealand in 1928, Boyce Richardson has worked as a journalist and editor in New Zealand, Australia, Britain and Canada. He first became interested in the Cree Indians while he was on the staff of the Montreal Star, and subsequently produced three documentary films about them. He is the author of several books and has contributed articles to many magazines in the United States, Canada and Britain. Richardson now lives in Ottawa.

CONNECT WITH THIS AUTHOR

Boyce Richardson's Website

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