Chelsea Green Publishing

Permaculture in Pots

Pages:200 pages
Size: 5.82 x 8.25 inch
Publisher:Permanent Publications
Paperback: 9781856230971
Pub. Date August 15, 2013

Permaculture in Pots

How to Grow Food in Small Urban Spaces


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Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
August 15, 2013

$14.95 $11.21

In these times of rising food prices and renewed interest in all things local, growing food in cities is becoming the big urban trend. Permaculture in Pots shows you how to get started with whatever space you have available--appealing to those who feel powerless to meet their own subsistence needs through lack of growing space.

Month by month we learn what to grow on a balcony or in a container garden, using low impact permaculture principles. It doesn’t matter when you pick up the book and start your journey of container gardening--wherever you are in the year, open the book to that chapter, and it will tell you what you should be doing.

Each month’s section details things to be done: how to plan ahead for the next season, and which fruit, vegetables, and herbs to be sowing, growing and eating.  There are recipes, photos and anecdotes from the author’s experience growing food on her small balcony in a London suburb. Kemp is warm and self-effacing, and makes an excellent guide. Each month has its own herb, with growing tips and culinary and medicinal uses for each.

As uncertainty rises about whether those outside the property ladder will ever get to own their own home, Permaculture in Pots gives power and opportunity back to generations who are becoming more aware of the need of self-sufficiency, and yet find themselves in rented homes with concrete where gardens once were.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Juliet Kemp

Juliet Kemp lives in London. She has recently acquired a (very small) garden and a new north-facing garden (two whole new permaculture designs to plan and execute!), and still does plenty of container growing. Permaculture in Pots was written from experiences gleaned from gardening her flat’s balcony, where she lived until she recently moved. Julie blogs in the USA and when not writing or pottering about her plant-growing spaces, she enjoys cycling, climbing, knitting, and making/upcycling all sorts of things.

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