Chelsea Green Publishing

Old Southern Apples

Pages:384 pages
Book Art:Full-color illustrations and black and white drawings throughout
Size: 8.5 x 11 inch
Publisher:Chelsea Green Publishing
Hardcover: 9781603582940
Pub. Date January 20, 2011

Old Southern Apples

A Comprehensive History and Description of Varieties for Collectors, Growers, and Fruit Enthusiasts, 2nd Edition

Availability: In Stock

Hardcover

Available Date:
January 20, 2011

$75.00

A book that became an instant classic when it first appeared in 1995, Old Southern Apples is an indispensable reference for fruit lovers everywhere, especially those who live in the southern United States. Out of print for several years, this newly revised and expanded edition now features descriptions of some 1,800 apple varieties that either originated in the South or were widely grown there before 1928.

Author Lee Calhoun is one of the foremost figures in apple conservation in America. This masterwork reflects his knowledge and personal experience over more than thirty years, as he sought out and grew hundreds of classic apples, including both legendary varieties (like Nickajack and Magnum Bonum) and little-known ones (like Buff and Cullasaga). Representing our common orchard heritage, many of these apples are today at risk of disappearing from our national table.

Illustrated with more than 120 color images of classic apples from the National Agricultural Library’s collection of watercolor paintings, Old Southern Apples is a fascinating and beautiful reference and gift book. In addition to A-to-Z descriptions of apple varieties, both extant and extinct, Calhoun provides a brief history of apple culture in the South, and includes practical information on growing apples and on their traditional uses.

REVIEWS AND PRAISE

"Lee Calhoun's first edition of Old Southern Apples did much to bring the forgotten fruits of Appalachia and the Piedmont to the attention of heritage food conservationists. But this new edition is so stunning that it will serve to keep these horticultural and culinary treasures in circulation for at least another century."--Gary Nabhan, author of Coming Home to Eat and coauthor of Renewing America's Food Traditions


"Apples beloved in America's past are making a comeback thanks to the work of crotchety apple growers like Lee Calhoun. His passion for seeking out the lore behind varieties like Barker's Liner and the humongous Gloria Mundi can only be described as tenacious. Much like a grandfather apple tree still offering its gifts from aside an abandoned cellar hole, Lee stands true with honest assessments of many classic heirlooms. The renewal of apple culture across Appalachia starts with getting this outstanding book!"--Michael Phillips, author of The Apple Grower: A Guide for the Organic Orchardist

AWARDS

  • Winner - Bookbuilder's Award (Best in Reference Books)

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Creighton Lee Calhoun

Lee Calhoun lives in Chatham County, North Carolina, where he settled after a career in the military. Over the past three decades he has sought out many old-time Southern apples and has grown more than 550 varieties himself. For many years he operated, along with his wife, Edith, Calhoun Nursery, which was a key resource for rare and regional apple varieties.

AUTHOR VIDEOS

Old Southern Apples

Old Southern Apples

Old Southern Apples Part II

Old Southern Apples Part II

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