Chelsea Green Publishing

Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money

Pages:240 pages
Book Art:Black and white diagrams
Size: 5.5 x 7.5 inch
Publisher:Chelsea Green Publishing
Paperback: 9781603582544
Pub. Date May 15, 2010
eBook: 9781603581127
Pub. Date May 15, 2010

Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money

Investing as if Food, Farms, and Fertility Mattered

By Woody Tasch
Foreword by Carlo Petrini

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
May 15, 2010

$15.95 $10.37

Availability: In Stock

eBook

Available Date:
May 15, 2010

$15.95 $10.37

Could there ever be an alternative stock exchange dedicated to slow, small, and local? Could a million American families get their food from CSAs? What if you had to invest 50 percent of your assets within 50 miles of where you live?Such questions-at the heart of slow money-represent the first steps on our path to a new economy.

Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money presents an essential new strategy for investing in local food systems and introduces a group of fiduciary activists who are exploring what should come after industrial finance and industrial agriculture. Theirs is a vision for investing that puts soil fertility into return-on-investment calculations and serves people and place as much at it serves industry sectors and markets.

Leading the charge is Woody Tasch-whose decades of work as a venture capitalist, foundation treasurer, and entrepreneur now shed new light on a truer, more beautiful, more prudent kind of fiduciary responsibility. He offers an alternative vision to the dusty old industrial concepts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries when dollars, and the businesses they financed, lost their connection to place; slow money, on the other hand, is firmly rooted in the new economic, social, and environmental realities of the 21st century.

Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money is a call to action for designing capital markets built around not extraction and consumption but preservation and restoration. Is it a movement or is it an investment strategy? Yes.



REVIEWS AND PRAISE

"Every once in a while, an idea comes around that you immediately know is not only a good one, but in fact is an absolutely necessary one. Slow Money is such an idea. Money is a powerful thing and whatever we collectively put our money into goes a long way toward creating the world that we live in. So far, those choices have led to many things, including a broken world food system, where nobody knows where their food comes from or what it takes to grow it. To become so divorced from something as essential as our food has had many disastrous consequences. I have great hope that sustainable, locally based food systems will help us all in more ways than we imagine. Slow Money can play a huge role in doing this and Woody's book is an inspiration to all of us working in sustainable agriculture. I can't wait to live in a world supported by Slow Money."--Tom Stearns, President, High Mowing Organic Seeds

"Slow Money is right on the money."--Tim Storrow, Executive Director, Castanea Foundation, Inc.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Woody Tasch

Woody Tasch is the Founder and Chairman of Slow Money, a non-profit headquartered in Boulder, Colorado, with an alliance of national and international chapters. Slow Money took root in 2009 when Tasch wrote his groundbreaking book “Inquiries Into the Nature of Slow Money: Investing as if Food, Farms, and Fertility Mattered.”

Tasch is widely regarded as a pioneer of the concepts of patient capital, mission-related investing and community-building venture capital. For ten years before founding Slow Money, he was the Chairman of Investor’s Circle, a network of investors that funds startups that emphasize sustainable business practices. Tasch was founding chairman of the Community Development Venture Capital Alliance and Treasurer of the Jessie Smith Noyes Foundation during the 90s, where he had the foresight to invest $1.25 million in Stonyfield Farm, which returned 3x cash-on-cash in five years.

Tasch is now working on the sequel to his first book, revisiting the fundamental principles of Slow Money, based on the experience of the last four years launching the organization and movement. To date, Slow Money has moved $30 million into 221 small food businesses around the country, including farms, creameries, grain mills, niche organic brands, local processing, distribution and seed companies, and restaurants.

AUTHOR EVENTS

September 12, 2015

Woody Tasch at Slow Money Southeast Regional Gathering

Central Carolina Community College & Pittsboro Memorial Library, 158 West St, Pittsboro, NC, 27312 | Woody Tasch
Woody Tasch will be the Saturday keynote speaker at the Slow Money Southeast Regional Gathering, which is taking place at the Central Carolina Community College in Pittsboro, NC. Tasch's keynote address, titled "The State of Soil," will take place on The Stage at The Plant on September 12th from 4:00-5:00PM. Tickets for the full weekend tickets to the conference are $100 until September 10, and are $125 thereafter. Single-day and single-session tickets are also available.

See all Events by this Author

AUTHOR VIDEOS

TEDxPresidio - Ari Derfel - Slow Money

Woody Tasch, author of Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money, discusses Investing

Woody Tasch discusses a New Approach to Money

Growing Slow Money

Growing Slow Money

Fast Money, Slow Money

Fast Money, Slow Money

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