Chelsea Green Publishing

Growing Healthy Vegetable Crops

Pages:104 pages
Book Art:Black and white illustrations
Size: 6 x 9 inch
Publisher:Chelsea Green Publishing
Paperback: 9781603583497
Pub. Date April 28, 2011
eBook: 9781603583503
Pub. Date April 28, 2011

Growing Healthy Vegetable Crops

Working with Nature to Control Diseases and Pests Organically

By Brian Caldwell
Illustrated by Jocelyn Langer

Categories:
Farm & Garden

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
April 28, 2011

$12.95 $6.47

Availability: In Stock

eBook

Available Date:
April 28, 2011

$12.95 $6.47

Part of the NOFA Guides. Includes information on:

  • Basic concepts of pest control (host susceptibility, soil health, genetic resistance, ecosystem factors)
  • Practical approaches (crop cultural practices, rescue treatments, special section on mammals and birds, food safety)
  • Farm design for pest reduction (diversity, crop rotation)
  • Unorthodox approaches (farmers out of the box)
  • Identifying pests
  • Crop-by-crop pests and practices

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Brian Caldwell

Brian Caldwell is the Farm Education Coordinator for the New York Chapter of the Northeast Organic Farming Association (NOFA-NY). For twenty years, he and his wife, Twinkle Griggs, ran Hemlock Grove Farm, a small commercial organic vegetable and fruit farm in hilly West Danby, NY. They helped found the Finger Lakes Organic Coop and were active members in the Ithaca Farmers' Market (another farmer-owned cooperative) during that time.

He received an MS in Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture from Cornell University in 1986. As a Cornell Cooperative Extension Educator, Brian advised commercial vegetable and berry growers in a five-county region from 1995 until starting with NOFA-NY in 2002. He keeps from getting too stale by managing a certified organic apple orchard in partnership with West Haven Farm of Ithaca, NY.

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