Archive for October, 2013


Reinventing Fire at the End of the Oil Age

Wednesday, October 16th, 2013

Forty years ago, key members of OPEC embargoed oil exports to the U.S. and other countries. Oil was scarce and prices soared. So what have we learned from the 1973 incident?

In short, not much. We are still largely living under the illusory belief that we can burn oil forever.

Four times since 1980, U.S. forces have intervened in the Persian Gulf to protect not Israel but oil. The Gulf hasn’t become more stable. Readiness for such interventions costs a half-trillion dollars per year—about ten times what we pay for oil from the Gulf, and rivaling total defense expenditures at the height of the Cold War. And burning oil emits two-fifths of fossil carbon, so abundant oil only speeds dangerous climate change that destabilizes the world and multiplies security threats.

In 2011, Amory Lovins and the Rocky Mountain Institute penned a comprehensive guide to weaning the United States completely off oil and coal by 2050. Reinventing Fire: Bold Business Solutions for the New Energy Era details how, by 2050, the United States could triple its energy efficiency while switching to more renewables and increasing the economy with no oil, coal, or nuclear energy and one-third less natural gas. All of this could cost $5 trillion less than “business as usual” and allow the United States to run a 158 percent bigger economy.

Reinventing Fire is a wise, detailed and comprehensive blueprint for gathering the best existing technologies for energy use and putting them to work right now to create jobs, end our dependence on climate-changing fossil fuels, and unleash the enormous economic potential of the coming energy revolution,” writes President Bill Clinton.

Now, as we approach the 40th anniversary of the oil embargo, we’re releasing Lovins’ book in an updated paperback edition.

Fracked oil and gas, Canadian tar sands, Saudi oil—none can beat modern efficiency and renewables on direct cost, price stability, or impacts, notes Lovins. The end of the conflict-creating, climate-threatening Oil Age is coming clearly into view, and not a moment too soon.

“Imagine fuel without fear,” writes Lovins in the Preface. “No runaway climate change. No oil spills, dead coal miners, dirty air, devastated lands, lost wildlife. No energy poverty. No oil-fed wars, tyrannies, or terrorists. Nothing to run out. Nothing to cut off. Nothing to worry about. Just energy abundance, benign and affordable, for all, for ever. That richer, fairer, cooler, safer world is possible, practical, even profitable—because saving and replacing fossil fuels increasingly works better and costs no more than buying and burning them. We just need a new fire.”

Reinventing Fire (Paperback edition) is available now and on sale for 35% off until October 23rd. Read an excerpt of Chapter One: Defossilizing Fuels below.

Defossilizing Fuels – An Excerpt from Reinventing Fire

Red Delicious: Ester’s Apple Strips

Monday, October 14th, 2013

Need the perfect companion to your afternoon cup of joe? Hanne Risgaard’s Home Baked: Nordic Recipes and Techniques for Organic Bread and Pastry has just the thing.

Cozy up and use your fall apple harvest to make Ester’s Apple Strips! These strips use sweet-tart apples as the filling for a delicious baked treat.

 

We can pickle that!

Wednesday, October 9th, 2013

As we approach National Pickle Day, we at Chelsea Green are here to be sure you are prepped for pickling just about anything on this very special holiday.

Pickling goes far beyond turning cucumbers into sour or sweet sides for your sandwich, or putting up your beans and beets. To show you what we mean, we’ve compiled a few unusual pickling ideas for your perusal. From plums to pee…yes, indeed, we can pickle that!

You’d be missing out if you didn’t try these Cinnamon Dark Red Plums, courtesy of Preserving Food without Canning or Freezing by the gardeners and farmers of Terre Vivante.

You can catch fermentation revivalist Sandor Katz, dubbed “The Prince of Pickles” by Civil Eats, at the Fourth Annual Portland Fermentation Festival on October 23, but in the meantime, his books Wild Fermentation and The Art of Fermentation are chock full of ideas and recipes to satisfy all your pickling needs. We’ve chosen a classic recipe for sour pickles and a not-so-classic excerpt that explains how to use your own urine to improve soil fertility—a practice used throughout the world.

Sour Pickles – From Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz

Fermenting Urine – From The Art of Fermentation by Sandor Katz

 

If it’s more practical pickling you prefer, pop on over to our archive of posts on how to make Dilly Beans, Ginger Beer, Dandelion Wine, Yogurt or Kefir Cheese, Sourdough Starter, and Kimchi. What’s your favorite way to pickle? Share your stories with us on Facebook or Twitter.

Presenting our Newest Paperbacks

Monday, October 7th, 2013

Our latest paperback releases will help you form a deep connection with the land around you and cultivate its flavors so you can eat in season. Rediscover old favorites with the softcover editions of Wild Flavors, Cooking Close to Home, and Sowing Seeds in the Desert. Your bookshelf will thank you.

Wild Flavors: One Chef’s Transformative Year Cooking from Eva’s Farm by Didi Emmons


Wild Flavors is a down-to-earth book rich in ideas and inspiration for people seeking to eat from their gardens and local areas. It’s filled with mouth-watering recipes and valuable cultivation, shopping, and storage tips.” – Sandor Ellix Katz, author of The Art of Fermentation

Alongside unique seasonal offerings, author and chef Didi Emmons provides profiles and tips on forty-six uncommon plants and shares celebrated farmer Eva Sommaripa’s wisdom about staying connected and maintaining a sane and healthy lifestyle in an increasingly hectic world.

Curiosity sparked Emmons’ initial venture down the Massachusetts coast to meet Sommaripa, whose 200-plus uncommon herbs, greens, and edible “weeds” supply many top Northeastern chefs. Wild Flavors follows Didi through a year in Eva’s garden and offers both the warmth of their shared tales as well as the exquisite foods Didi came to develop using only the freshest of ingredients and wild edibles.

Cooking Close to Home: A Year of Seasonal Recipes by Diane Imrie and Richard Jarmusz


“This is a cookbook for the future—in the world we’re building, where local food means both security and pleasure, this will be a companion for many a pioneer!” – Bill McKibben, author of Deep Economy

Eating locally is becoming a priority to people everywhere, but preparing local food throughout the four seasons can be a culinary challenge. Common questions like, “how can I eat locally in January?” or “how do I prepare what my CSA provides?” can confront even the most committed locavore. Cooking Close to Home is a seasonal guide that will inspire you to create delicious and nutritious meals with ingredients produced in your own community. Award-winning chef Richard Jarmusz and registered dietitian Diane Imrie make the ideal partners to stimulate your creativity in the kitchen, teaching you how to prepare fabulous local foods without ever sacrificing flavor for nutrition.

Sowing Seeds in the Desert: Natural Farming, Global Restoration, and Ultimate Food Security by Masanobu Fukuoka


Sowing Seeds in the Desert will persuade readers that the imperiled living world is our greatest teacher, and inspire them to care for it as vigorously as Fukuoka has.” – Toby Hemenway, author of Gaia’s Garden

Sowing Seeds in the Desert is Masanobu Fukuoka’s last major work—and perhaps his most important. After the publication of his best-known work, One-Straw Revolution, Fukuoka spent years working with people and organizations around the world to prove that food can be grown and forests regenerated, with very little irrigation, even in the most desolate of places. Sowing Seeds in the Desert follows Fukuoka’s efforts to rehabilitate the deserts of the world using natural farming, to feed a growing human population, rehabilitate damaged landscapes, reverse the spread of deserts, and encourage a deep understanding of the relations.

Wild Flavors, Cooking Close to Home, and Sowing Seeds in the Desert are available now and on sale for 35% off until October 14.

Do you ‘Like’ us?

Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013

There’s been a lot of media attention recently to “the sharing economy” — a tech-enabled way for people to share rides, rent out rooms or houses, and much more.


For nearly 30 years, Chelsea Green Publishing has practiced an age-old form of the sharing economy — sharing recipes, DIY tips for your home, garden, farmkitchen, and community.


Books are the primary way we share information, but we use social media — Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Google+, as well as our twice-monthly newsletter— on a daily basis to share simple projects you can tackle in a weekend, special bargains, and more that you can then, in turn, share with friends, neighbors, and coworkers.

Join our growing online community:

If you haven’t already, consider joining the 18,000+ like-minded readers who already “like” us on Facebook, or the 21,000+ who follow us on Twitter, or the more than 50,000 people who receive our newsletter.


From your sharing friends Chelsea Green Publishing


P.S. All new subscribers to our newsletter receive a 25 percent discount on their next purchase when they buy direct from us.

 

 

 

From Flame to Ash: How to get the Most out of Your Wood-Fired Oven

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

What could be better than an oven you can build yourself, that allows you to cook an array of delicious edibles outside, and can help restore the individual and communal resiliency we’ve lost in recent decades?

Wood-fired ovens are no longer reserved for commercial, or dedicated, artisan bakers. In recent years, they’ve resurfaced as an invaluable and entertaining addition to any home.

From the Wood-Fired Oven is not just a bread book — but a bread book, a cookbook, and an oven building book all in one. Author Richard Miscovich offers readers oven building and design plans and tips, how to produce grilled or roasted fish, vegetables, and meats, and why it’s a good idea to re-learn the tradition of cooking with fire.

“In addition to the romance of masonry, fire, and food, this book is written out of the reemergence of, and need for, resilience in both our global food culture and everyday lives,” writes Miscovich.

Miscovich, a leading baker and instructor, breaks down the book into three parts—an overview of ovens and fire, the bread baking process itself, and instruction on how to capture and utilize the full heat cycle of a wood-fired oven. In other words, from the first kindling to the last ember — learn how to use the oven’s rising, and falling, temperatures to cook different foods, oil infusions, and more.

“Richard has done so much more than just transfer his extensive knowledge about baking and wood-fired ovens onto paper in this book;” says Jeff Yankellow, board chair of the Bread Baker’s Guild of America. “He talks to the reader in a way that makes you feel that he is right in front of you. You will learn about the bones of a wood-fired oven, including not just how to use it but how to make the most of it. It is a must-have addition to the collection of any food enthusiast, amateur or professional!”

“We have needed a book that addresses everything a wood-firing baker and cook has to know, and here it is,” writes Dan Wing, co-author of The Bread Builders, in the book’s Foreword. “This book is going to change the way I use my oven—how I make and control the heat and steam, the things I bake and cook, and how much of the heat of the oven I use instead of waste. If you are just starting now to plan a masonry oven—or if you have been using one for 20 years—you are still going to want to own this book.”

From the Wood-Fired Oven: New and Traditional Techniques for Cooking and Baking with Fire is available now and on sale for 35% off until October 7th. 

From the Wood-Fired Oven Preface


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