Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

The Fermentation Fascination Continues: Sandor Katz Profiled on Chow.com

It started in 2003 with the publication of Wild Fermentation: The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-Culture Foods by Sandor Katz: chefs, foodies, hipsters, and foodie hipsters rediscovered the magical process of fermentation—and the endless culinary possibilities that lay within. Maybe it’s something about the experimental DIY-ness of fermenting your own unique take on sauerkraut. Maybe it’s the vague sense that you’re breaking some kind of food safety law, somewhere. Maybe it’s just that pickled stuff tastes awesome.

Whatever the case, the fermentation infatuation is sweeping the nation. And Sandor Katz, fermentation guru of the highest order, is there to guide us through it.

Fermented “live” foods are the next bacon. There’s Kombucha, the fizzy health tonic made from a Himalayan fungus. Homemade sauerkraut is being served as a side at artsy barbecue joints in Brooklyn’s Williamsburg neighborhood. You’ll find kimchee stuffed inside a croissant at New York City’s Milk Bar. These unpasteurized, rustic preparations, made, essentially, by purposefully letting food rot so the beneficial bacteria in the air leave behind sour flavors and a healthy zing, are ancient. Live fermentation and old-fashioned pickling, using just salt and the air rather than vinegar, were ways of preserving foods before refrigeration, from meat to milk to vegetables. But the recent fermentation craze among chefs and DIYers can be directly traced to Sandor Katz, whose 2002 book, Wild Fermentation, is still the most exhaustive, info-packed exploration of the topic ever written.

Katz, who calls himself Sandorkraut, lives off the grid in a queer intentional community in the mountains of Tennessee and teaches workshops all over the world. His book, which is a cross between a cookbook and a science-experiment manual, is a compendium of years of research from cultures around the world. Besides covering pickles, sauerkraut, kimchee, miso, tempeh, beer, and breads of many kinds including sourdough, there’s obscure stuff like chicha, a Latin American corn beverage made with human saliva now being adapted by the brewery Dogfish Head (see Sam Calagione). “There’s a hunger for this information,” says Katz, whose recent Portland, Oregon, workshop saw 25 people approach him with samples [of fermented things] they’d made. “A mystique, and a little fear.”

Read the whole article here.

 

Related Articles:


Recipe: Fast Ricotta Cheese

Making cheese at home may seem like a time and labor-intensive process, but what if you could make a delicious, high-quality cheese in about one hour? According to David Asher, author of The Art of Natural Cheesemaking, you can. This version of ricotta is made by adding acidity to sweet whey in the form of lemon […] Read More

Q&A with Pascal Baudar: The New Wildcrafted Cuisine

A Q&A with Pascal Baudar, author of The New Wildcrafted Cuisine: Exploring the Exotic Gastronomy of Local Terroir Go foraging with master forager Pascal Baudar this Spring! The School of the New American Farmstead at Sterling College presents a 2-week intensive course on Foraging and Wildcrafting. Learn to identify, process, preserve, cook, and EAT the […] Read More

RECIPE: Grilled Nopalitos for Cinco de Mayo

From The Occidental Arts and Ecology Center Cookbook Native to Mexico and prevalent throughout the Southwest and California, the prickly pear or nopal cactus, Opuntia ficus-indica, is a stunning drought-hearty landscaping plant, natural barbed-wire fence, and a source of nutritious food – both pads and fruit are edible. Inside the prickly pads lies a cooling, […] Read More

Ask the Experts: Submit Your Permaculture Questions Now

Attention all growers, food-lovers, and green-living enthusiasts, we are once again celebrating Permaculture Month by putting our pioneering permaculture authors to work for you.Chelsea Green is proud to publish and distribute some of the most recognized, and award-winning, names in permaculture, and we’re making several of them available to our readers to answer any and all […] Read More

Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation – Review in Small Farm Canada Magazine

This review was originally published in Small Farm Canada, Volume 12, Issue 5, September/October 2015If you could have only one book on mushroom production…Review by Janet WallaceTradd Cotter‘s book, Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation, is a masterpiece. I have long been interested in growing mushrooms and have read several books on the topic. This book, […] Read More
Follow us
Get every new post delivered to your inbox
Join millions of other followers
Powered By WPFruits.com