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Preserving by Drying: Sun-Dried and Fermented Tomato Coulis

The following is an excerpt from Preserving Food Without Freezing or Canning: Traditional Techniques Using Salt, Oil, Sugar, Alcohol, Vinegar, Drying, Cold Storage, and Lactic Fermentation by the Gardeners & Farmers of Terre Vivante. It has been adapted for the Web.

  • Tomatoes
  • Salt
  • Olive Oil
  • A stoneware or earthenware jar
  • A wooden spatula
  • A strainer
  • A bowl
  • A masher
  • A cloth bag
  • Small glass jars
  • Waxed paper

Put very ripe tomatoes, cut in half but with seeds and all, into a stoneware or earthenware jar. Leave to ferment for eight days, taking care to stir daily with a wooden spatula. When the eight days are up, strain the contents into a bowl. Crush the tomatoes carefully with a masher, and pour the sauce obtained into a cloth bag to remove all the liquid. Hang the bag and let it drain for two days.

Spread the coulis on a plate and leave it out in the sun to dry for several days. Add salt to taste and stir with a wooden spatula. Fill small jars with the coulis and cover with olive oil. Close the jars with waxed paper (or lids).

J. Barallier, Auriol


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