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Is My Broth (or Stock) Bad?

Are you planning to start the GAPS diet or any other diet aimed at boosting gut health this year?

If so, chances are that stocks and broths are critical components.

Even if you’re not changing the way you eat, but you often have pots of aromatic goodness bubbling on your stove, you may have wondered, “When do stocks (or broths) go bad? How long do they stay good in the fridge? How long can they stay at room temperature? How do I know when to chuck them?”

Here’s the long and the short of it, according to GAPS chef Monica Corrado:

  • If your broth is sealed with a layer of fat, then you’re good to go for about six months!
  • If the broth is exposed to air, it is good in the fridge for five to seven days. In this case, when you take it out, bring it to a boil and skim the scum—you’ll have another week to use it.
  • If you ever find that it smells off, toss it. Likewise, if you bring it to a boil and the scum keeps coming and coming—again, it’s time to throw it out.

If you stick to these rules, you’ll do just fine. Here’s to a healthier gut–and a healthier you–in the new year! (Homemade bone broth in particular helps to boost the immune system. Fight those winter colds with these essential recipes.)

And for more on cooking nourishing and delicious GAPS diet recipes, check out The Heal Your Gut Cookbook by Hilary Boynton and Mary G. Brackett. (This post was adapted from the book.)


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