Chelsea Green Publishing

Cooking Close to Home

Pages:240 pages
Book Art:Color photos throughout
Size: 7.5 x 9.75 inch
Publisher:Chelsea Green Publishing
Paperback: 9781603585194
Pub. Date September 15, 2013

Cooking Close to Home

A Year of Seasonal Recipes

Food & Drink

Availability: In Stock


Available Date:
September 15, 2013


Cooking Close to Home: A Year of Seasonal Recipes is a collection of over 150 original recipes designed to follow the seasons. Whether you are a home gardener, a farmers' market regular, or a member of a community-supported agriculture program, this cookbook will serve as a seasonal guide to using the foods available in your region. Each recipe includes useful "Harvest Hints" that explain how to find, purchase, prepare, and preserve fresh and seasonal ingredients. Within each chapter you will find information about sustainable food, small family farms, and how to reduce your carbon footprint by buying local foods. There are also appetizing food photographs and inspiring stories of farms, orchards, and farmers' markets throughout the northeast.


"This collection of over 150 original recipes is designed to take you on a culinary journey through the seasons. Each recipe includes useful 'Harvest Hints' that explain how to find, purchase, prepare, and preserve fresh and seasonal ingredients. Within each chapter, you will find information about sustainable food, small family farms, and how to reduce your carbon footprint. The attractive photos and inspiring stories of farms, orchards, and farmers' markets will have you turning to this book over and over again."--Mise en place, Culinary Institute of America

"Cooking Close to Home has earned a permanent place on my kitchen bookshelf. The recipes and photography make me hungry for the coming season making it easier to say 'goodbye until next year' to asparagus, strawberries and tomatoes. This book celebrates the true spirit of the Localvore movement with recipes that star seasonal ingredients that I can easily find at my farmers' market here in Vermont and throughout the Northeast."--Robin McDermott, Co-founder, Mad River Valley Localvores

"This is a completely lovely book. This is a cookbook for the future-in the world we're building, where local food means both security and pleasure, this will be a companion for many a pioneer!"--Bill McKibben, author of Deep Economy

Following the course of changing seasons and using locally raised meats and produce have become touchstones for contemporary cuisine. Imrie and Jarmusz emphasize vegetarian dishes, but carnivores have little to complain about since duck, chicken, pork, beef, salmon, and trout all star in multiple places. Seeds, nuts, and cheeses enliven salads and vegetable gratins, and plenty of imaginative and colorful relishes and salsas dress up even the plainest meals. They leap the border to create a classic Quebecois meat pie, tortiere, using buffalo, venison, and beef for richer flavor than the customary all-beef version. Imrie and Jarmusz offer a few recipes for preserving the summer's bounty by pickling pepper, canning corn relish, and even bottling a maple syrup-based barbecue sauce. Full-color photographs make the recipes' results appear even more attractive. New England and Northeast libraries will find this title particularly useful.

Library Journal-
In this reprint of a 2009 self-published book, registered dietitian Imrie and professional chef Jarmusz combine their professional talents and passion for sustainability to present recipes with local ingredients for deliciously fresh meals. They advocate growing produce in backyard gardens, participating in community gardens, and purchasing from local farmers' markets or farm shares. Fresh, seasonable vegetables and fruits are key ingredients, as are whole-grain flours. The book is organized by meal course and then by season. The complete index includes meal courses and ingredients, making the recipes exceedingly accessible. Nearly every dish receives a full-page color photo, and tips include recommendations for selecting and preserving produce and meats as well as shortcuts and cooking methods. Although the authors live in the Northeast, the recipes and hints pertain to locations throughout North America. Most of the recipes are easy enough for weekday dinners yet colorful enough for company.

Verdict: Imrie and Jarmusz's beautiful, simple recipes that use local sustainable ingredients will please any cook looking for delicious guilt-free meals.


Diane Imrie

Diane Imrie is a Registered Dietitian and graduate of McGill University in Montreal. She also holds a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Vermont. Diane has been speaking nationally on the topic of sustainable food for the past several years.

Richard Jarmusz

Richard Jarmusz has worked as an executive chef for twenty five years and is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York. Richard has won awards and is sought after for cooking demonstrations and culinary consulting. Both Richard and Diane have been involved in the local food system in Vermont for many years, and have implemented a local and sustainable food program that is nationally recognized. Richard is also a backyard gardener, and Diane is known for her community garden work.


Braised Turkey Thighs with Currants
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
4 turkey thighs, about 1 pound each,rinsed, drained and patted dry
2 tablespoons olive or canola oil
1 cup onion, finely chopped
1 tablespoon fresh garlic, chopped
5 cups turkey or Basic Chicken Stock(see page 61 for recipe)
2 tablespoons tomato paste1 cup dried red currants
¼ cup honey
¼ cup fresh parsley, finely chopped
1 teaspoon fresh sage, finely chopped

• Combine flour, salt and pepper in a bowl, and mix well.
• Place turkey thighs in a bowl and pour the flour mixture over the turkey. Toss until the turkey is well coated with flour. Reserve the remaining flour for later use in the recipe.
• Heat a skillet over medium heat, add oil and brown the turkey thighs.
• Remove the turkey and set aside. Add the onions and garlic and sauté until tender. Add the reserved flour and cook, stirring until light brown, about 2 minutes.
• In a medium bowl combine the stock and tomato paste, and mix well. Add this to the pan and stir in. Return the turkey
to the pan, bring to a boil, and then reduce the heat to low.
Cover and simmer for 45 to 55 minutes depending on size of
the thighs. Cook until the turkey reaches 165 ºF.
• Add the currants, honey, parsley and sage, and quickly bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Serve turkey thighs with sauce.

Serves six


Long Way on a Little

Long Way on a Little

By Shannon Hayes

"Every earth-conscious home cook who wishes to nourish his or her family with sustainable, local, grassfed and pastured meats should be able to do so, regardless of income," argues Shannon Hayes, "we just have to change how we're eating." In her largest, most comprehensive volume to-date, North America's leading authority on grassfed meat examines the conundrum of maintaining a healthy, affordable and ecologically sound meat-based diet, while simultaneously paying America's small sustainable farmers a fair price for their food. "But to do it," she adds, "we need to expand our menus to include more than just the prime cuts, and we need to learn how to work with leftovers."

More than just a cookbook, Long Way on a Little presents Hayes' practical knowledge about integrating livestock into a sustainable society with her accessible writing and engaging wit. Designed to be the only meat book a home cook could ever need, Long Way on a Little is packed with Hayes' signature delicious no-fail recipes for perfect roasts and steaks cooked indoors and out on the grill, easy-to-follow techniques to make use of the less-conventional, inexpensive cuts that often go to waste, tips on stretching a sustainable food budget, and an extensive section on using leftovers and creating soups; all with the aim of helping home cooks make the most effective and economical use of their local farm products or their own backyard livestock.

While addressing the topic of making local food more affordable, Hayes also frankly grapples with tough health issues confronting so many Americans today, from diabetes to grain and gluten intolerance. The result is a family-pleasing, nutrient-dense, affordable cuisine that is a joy to prepare, rich in authentic flavor, and steeped in the wisdom of the world's greatest culinary traditions, all bundled together in a thought-provoking and informative book that is as stimulating to the mind as it is to the palate. Features include:

  • Recipes for cooking all major cuts of grassfed and pastured meats indoors and out on the grill
  • Carbohydrate counts on all recipes for low carb and diabetic diets
  • Guide to grain-free, legume-free, dairy-free and paleo-friendly recipes
  • Recipes for using animal fats in traditional cuisine, as well as for soaps, salves and candle-making
  • 16 page full-color insert illustrating fundamental techniques for working with whole animals: from making broth and demi-glace, grilling steaks and cutting up chickens, to rendering fat and soap, salve and candle making
  • Extensive section on soups and leftovers
  • Lively, up-to-date discussions of current issues pertaining to sustainable livestock farming in North America
  • Money-saving tips for making delicious meals go as far as possible

Available in: Paperback

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Long Way on a Little

Shannon Hayes

Paperback $34.95

Cheese and Culture

Cheese and Culture

By Paul Kindstedt

Behind every traditional type of cheese there is a fascinating story. By examining the role of the cheesemaker throughout world history and by understanding a few basic principles of cheese science and technology, we can see how different cheeses have been shaped by and tailored to their surrounding environment, as well as defined by their social and cultural context. Cheese and Culture endeavors to advance our appreciation of cheese origins by viewing human history through the eyes of a cheese scientist.

There is also a larger story to be told, a grand narrative that binds all cheeses together into a single history that started with the discovery of cheese making and that is still unfolding to this day. This book reconstructs that 9000-year story based on the often fragmentary information that we have available. Cheese and Culture embarks on a journey that begins in the Neolithic Age and winds its way through the ensuing centuries to the present. This tour through cheese history intersects with some of the pivotal periods in human prehistory and ancient, classical, medieval, renaissance, and modern history that have shaped western civilization, for these periods also shaped the lives of cheesemakers and the diverse cheeses that they developed. The book offers a useful lens through which to view our twenty-first century attitudes toward cheese that we have inherited from our past, and our attitudes about the food system more broadly.

This refreshingly original book will appeal to anyone who loves history, food, and especially good cheese.

Available in: Paperback, eBook

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Cheese and Culture

Paul Kindstedt

eBook $17.95

The Hop Grower's Handbook

The Hop Grower's Handbook

By Laura Ten Eyck and Dietrich Gehring

With information on siting, planting, tending, harvesting, processing, and brewing

It’s hard to think about beer these days without thinking about hops. 

The runaway craft beer market’s convergence with the ever-expanding local foods movement is helping to spur a local-hops renaissance. The demand from craft brewers for local ingredients to make beer—such as hops and barley—is robust and growing. That’s good news for farmers looking to diversify, but the catch is that hops have not been grown commercially in the eastern United States for nearly a century. 

Today, farmers from Maine to North Carolina are working hard to respond to the craft brewers’ desperate call for locally grown hops. But questions arise: How best to create hop yards—virtual forests of 18-foot poles that can be expensive to build? How to select hop varieties, and plant and tend the bines, which often take up to three years to reach full production? How to best pick, process, and price them for market? And, how best to manage the fungal diseases and insects that wiped out the eastern hop industry one hundred years ago, and which are thriving in the hotter and more humid states thanks to climate change? Answers to these questions can be found in The Hop Grower’s Handbook—the only book on the market about raising hops sustainably, on a small scale, for the commercial craft beer market in the Northeast.  

Written by hop farmers and craft brewery owners Laura Ten Eyck and Dietrich Gehring, The Hop Grower’s Handbook is a beautifully photographed and illustrated book that weaves the story of their Helderberg Hop Farm with the colorful history of New York and New England hop farming, relays horticultural information about the unusual hop plant and the mysterious resins it produces that give beer a distinctively bitter flavor, and includes an overview of the numerous native, heirloom, and modern varieties of hops and their purposes. The authors also provide an easy-to-understand explanation of the beer-brewing process—critical for hop growers to understand in order be able to provide the high-quality product brewers want to buy—along with recipes from a few of their favorite home and micro-brewers.

The book also provides readers with detailed information on: 
•    Selecting, preparing, and designing a hop yard site, including irrigation;
•    Tending to the hops, with details on best practices to manage weeds, insects, and diseases; and,
•    Harvesting, drying, analyzing, processing, and pricing hops for market.

The overwhelming majority of books and resources devoted to hop production currently available are geared toward the Pacific Northwest’s large-scale commercial growers, who use synthetic pesticides, fungicides, herbicides, and fertilizers and deal with regionally specific climate, soils, weeds, and insect populations. Ten Eyck and Gehring, however, focus on farming hops sustainably. While they relay their experience about growing in a new Northeastern climate subject to the higher temperatures and volatile cycles of drought and deluge brought about by global warming, this book will be an essential resource for home-scale and small-scale commercial hops growers in all regions.

Available in: Paperback

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The Hop Grower's Handbook

Laura Ten Eyck, Dietrich Gehring

Paperback $34.95



By Gordon Edgar

And what it can tell us about our history, cultural identity, and food politics

One of the oldest, most ubiquitous, and beloved cheeses in the world, the history of cheddar is a fascinating one. Over the years it has been transformed, from a painstakingly handmade wheel to a rindless, mass-produced block, to a liquefied and emulsified plastic mass untouched by human hands. The Henry Fordism of cheddar production in many ways anticipated the advent of industrial agriculture.  They don’t call it “American Cheese” for nothing.

Cheddar is one man’s picaresque journey to find out what a familiar food can tell us about ourselves. Cheddar may be appreciated in almost all American homes, but the advocates of the traditional wheel versus the processed slice often have very different ideas about food. Since cheddar—with its diversity of manufacturing processes and tastes—is such a large umbrella, it is the perfect food through which to discuss many big food issues that face our society.

More than that, though, cheddar actually holds a key to understanding not only issues surrounding food politics, but also some of the ways we think of our cultural identity. Cheddar, and its offshoots, has something to tell us about this country: the way people rally to certain cheddars but not others; the way they extol or denounce the way others eat it; the role of the commodification of a once-artisan cheese and the effect that has on rural communities. The fact that cheddar is so common that it is often taken for granted means that examining it can lead us to the discovery of usually unspoken truths.

Author Gordon Edgar (Cheesemonger: A Life on the Wedge) is well equipped to take readers on a tour through the world of cheddar. For more than fifteen years he has worked as an iconoclastic cheesemonger in San Francisco, but his sharp talent for observation and social critique were honed long before then, in the world of ’zines, punk rock, and progressive politics. His fresh perspectives on such a seemingly common topic are as thought-provoking as they are entertaining.

Available in: Hardcover, eBook

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Gordon Edgar

Hardcover $25.00