Chelsea Green Publishing

Cooking Close to Home

Pages:240 pages
Book Art:Color photos throughout
Size: 7.5 x 9.75 inch
Publisher:Chelsea Green Publishing
Paperback: 9781603585194
Pub. Date September 15, 2013

Cooking Close to Home

A Year of Seasonal Recipes

Food & Drink

Availability: In Stock


Available Date:
September 15, 2013


Cooking Close to Home: A Year of Seasonal Recipes is a collection of over 150 original recipes designed to follow the seasons. Whether you are a home gardener, a farmers' market regular, or a member of a community-supported agriculture program, this cookbook will serve as a seasonal guide to using the foods available in your region. Each recipe includes useful "Harvest Hints" that explain how to find, purchase, prepare, and preserve fresh and seasonal ingredients. Within each chapter you will find information about sustainable food, small family farms, and how to reduce your carbon footprint by buying local foods. There are also appetizing food photographs and inspiring stories of farms, orchards, and farmers' markets throughout the northeast.


"Cooking Close to Home has earned a permanent place on my kitchen bookshelf. The recipes and photography make me hungry for the coming season making it easier to say 'goodbye until next year' to asparagus, strawberries and tomatoes. This book celebrates the true spirit of the Localvore movement with recipes that star seasonal ingredients that I can easily find at my farmers' market here in Vermont and throughout the Northeast."--Robin McDermott, Co-founder, Mad River Valley Localvores

"This is a completely lovely book. This is a cookbook for the future-in the world we're building, where local food means both security and pleasure, this will be a companion for many a pioneer!"--Bill McKibben, author of Deep Economy

"This collection of over 150 original recipes is designed to take you on a culinary journey through the seasons. Each recipe includes useful 'Harvest Hints' that explain how to find, purchase, prepare, and preserve fresh and seasonal ingredients. Within each chapter, you will find information about sustainable food, small family farms, and how to reduce your carbon footprint. The attractive photos and inspiring stories of farms, orchards, and farmers' markets will have you turning to this book over and over again."--Mise en place, Culinary Institute of America

Following the course of changing seasons and using locally raised meats and produce have become touchstones for contemporary cuisine. Imrie and Jarmusz emphasize vegetarian dishes, but carnivores have little to complain about since duck, chicken, pork, beef, salmon, and trout all star in multiple places. Seeds, nuts, and cheeses enliven salads and vegetable gratins, and plenty of imaginative and colorful relishes and salsas dress up even the plainest meals. They leap the border to create a classic Quebecois meat pie, tortiere, using buffalo, venison, and beef for richer flavor than the customary all-beef version. Imrie and Jarmusz offer a few recipes for preserving the summer's bounty by pickling pepper, canning corn relish, and even bottling a maple syrup-based barbecue sauce. Full-color photographs make the recipes' results appear even more attractive. New England and Northeast libraries will find this title particularly useful.

Library Journal-
In this reprint of a 2009 self-published book, registered dietitian Imrie and professional chef Jarmusz combine their professional talents and passion for sustainability to present recipes with local ingredients for deliciously fresh meals. They advocate growing produce in backyard gardens, participating in community gardens, and purchasing from local farmers' markets or farm shares. Fresh, seasonable vegetables and fruits are key ingredients, as are whole-grain flours. The book is organized by meal course and then by season. The complete index includes meal courses and ingredients, making the recipes exceedingly accessible. Nearly every dish receives a full-page color photo, and tips include recommendations for selecting and preserving produce and meats as well as shortcuts and cooking methods. Although the authors live in the Northeast, the recipes and hints pertain to locations throughout North America. Most of the recipes are easy enough for weekday dinners yet colorful enough for company.

Verdict: Imrie and Jarmusz's beautiful, simple recipes that use local sustainable ingredients will please any cook looking for delicious guilt-free meals.


Diane Imrie

Diane Imrie is a Registered Dietitian and graduate of McGill University in Montreal. She also holds a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Vermont. Diane has been speaking nationally on the topic of sustainable food for the past several years.

Richard Jarmusz

Richard Jarmusz has worked as an executive chef for twenty five years and is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York. Richard has won awards and is sought after for cooking demonstrations and culinary consulting. Both Richard and Diane have been involved in the local food system in Vermont for many years, and have implemented a local and sustainable food program that is nationally recognized. Richard is also a backyard gardener, and Diane is known for her community garden work.


Braised Turkey Thighs with Currants
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
4 turkey thighs, about 1 pound each,rinsed, drained and patted dry
2 tablespoons olive or canola oil
1 cup onion, finely chopped
1 tablespoon fresh garlic, chopped
5 cups turkey or Basic Chicken Stock(see page 61 for recipe)
2 tablespoons tomato paste1 cup dried red currants
¼ cup honey
¼ cup fresh parsley, finely chopped
1 teaspoon fresh sage, finely chopped

• Combine flour, salt and pepper in a bowl, and mix well.
• Place turkey thighs in a bowl and pour the flour mixture over the turkey. Toss until the turkey is well coated with flour. Reserve the remaining flour for later use in the recipe.
• Heat a skillet over medium heat, add oil and brown the turkey thighs.
• Remove the turkey and set aside. Add the onions and garlic and sauté until tender. Add the reserved flour and cook, stirring until light brown, about 2 minutes.
• In a medium bowl combine the stock and tomato paste, and mix well. Add this to the pan and stir in. Return the turkey
to the pan, bring to a boil, and then reduce the heat to low.
Cover and simmer for 45 to 55 minutes depending on size of
the thighs. Cook until the turkey reaches 165 ºF.
• Add the currants, honey, parsley and sage, and quickly bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Serve turkey thighs with sauce.

Serves six


Genetic Roulette

Genetic Roulette

By Jeffrey M. Smith

Never-before-seen evidence points to genetically engineered foods as a major contributor to rising disease rates in the U.S. population, especially among children. Gastrointestinal disorders, allergies, inflammatory diseases, and infertility are just some of the problems identified in humans, pets. livestock, and lab animals that eat genetically modified soybeans and corn.

Monsanto's strong-arm tactics, the FDA's fraudulent policies, and how the USDA ignores a growing health emergency are also laid bare. This sometimes shocking film may change your diet, help you protect your family, and accelerate the consumer tipping point against genetically modified organisms (GMOs). A film not to be missed.

Also includes the bonus DVD Seeds of Freedom (28 min.) narrated by Jeremy Irons, and produced by the Gaia Foundation and African Biodiversity Network. This landmark film shows how the story of seed at the hands of multinationals has become one of loss, control, dependence, and debt. Also: two talks by Jeffrey M. Smith and twelve public-service announcements.

Available in: DVD

Read More

Genetic Roulette

Jeffrey M. Smith, Jeremy Irons, Lisa Oz, Micah Salaberrios

DVD $19.95

The New Bread Basket

The New Bread Basket

By Amy Halloran

For more than 10,000 years, grains have been the staples of Western civilization. The stored energy of grain allowed our ancestors to shift from nomadic hunting and gathering and build settled communities—even great cities. Though most bread now comes from factory bakeries, the symbolism of wheat and bread—amber waves of grain, the staff of life—still carries great meaning.

Today, bread and beer are once again building community as a new band of farmers, bakers, millers, and maltsters work to reinvent local grain systems. The New Bread Basket tells their stories and reveals the village that stands behind every loaf and every pint.

While eating locally grown crops like heirloom tomatoes has become almost a cliché, grains are late in arriving to local tables, because growing them requires a lot of land and equipment. Milling, malting, and marketing take both tools and cooperation. The New Bread Basket reveals the bones of that cooperation, profiling the seed breeders, agronomists, and grassroots food activists who are collaborating with farmers, millers, bakers, and other local producers.

Take Andrea and Christian Stanley, a couple who taught themselves the craft of malting and opened the first malthouse in New England in one hundred years. Outside Ithaca, New York, bread from a farmer-miller-baker partnership has become an emblem in the battle against shale gas fracking. And in the Pacific Northwest, people are shifting grain markets from commodity exports to regional feed, food, and alcohol production. Such pioneering grain projects give consumers an alternative to industrial bread and beer, and return their production to a scale that respects people, local communities, and the health of the environment.

Many Americans today avoid gluten and carbohydrates. Yet, our shared history with grains—from the village baker to Wonder Bread—suggests that modern changes in farming and processing could be the real reason that grains have become suspect in popular nutrition. The people profiled in The New Bread Basket are returning to traditional methods like long sourdough fermentations that might address the dietary ills attributed to wheat. Their work and lives make our foundational crops visible, and vital, again.

Available in: Paperback

Read More

The New Bread Basket

Amy Halloran

Paperback $17.95

The Uses of Wild Plants

The Uses of Wild Plants

By Frank Tozer

A must-have for foragers, botanists, herbalists, gardeners, permaculturists, and anyone who wants to learn more about wild plants, this insightful guide provides interesting and valuable uses for more than 1200 species in 500 genera of wild plants found throughout North America and beyond.

The Uses of Wild Plants provides a survey of how plants have been used for food, drink, medicine, fuel, clothing, intoxicants, and more throughout history. Each listing includes a detailed description and drawing to aid in identifying these valuable plants in your garden and in the wild.

Greenthumbs will learn cultivation techniques for the most significant of these plants, and their uses in the garden. Tozer foresees a future where plants are an integral part of an ecologically sustainable society. They will provide renewable sources of energy, fertilizer, chemicals, building materials, and more, and will give us the means to clean our waterways and groundwater, desalinate soil, recover valuable nutrients from waste, and maybe even help to slow global warming.

Available in: Paperback

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The Uses of Wild Plants

Frank Tozer

Paperback $24.95

Breed Your Own Vegetable Varieties

Breed Your Own Vegetable Varieties

By Carol Deppe

All gardeners and farmers should be plant breeders, says author Carol Deppe. Developing new vegetable varieties doesn't require a specialized education, a lot of land, or even a lot of time. It can be done on any scale. It's enjoyable. It's deeply rewarding. You can get useful new varieties much faster than you might suppose. And you can eat your mistakes.

Authoritative and easy-to-understand, Breed Your Own Vegetable Varieties: The Gardener's and Farmer's Guide to Plant Breeding and Seed Saving is the only guide to plant breeding and seed saving for the serious home gardener and the small-scale farmer or commercial grower. Discover:

  • how to breed for a wide range of different traits (flavor, size, shape, or color; cold or heat tolerance; pest and disease resistance; and regional adaptation)
  • how to save seed and maintain varieties
  • how to conduct your own variety trials and other farm- or garden-based research
  • how to breed for performance under organic or sustainable growing methods

In this one-size-fits-all world of multinational seed companies, plant patents, and biotech monopolies, more and more gardeners and farmers are recognizing that they need to "take back their seeds." They need to save more of their own seed, grow and maintain the best traditional and regional varieties, and develop more of their own unique new varieties. Breed Your Own Vegetable Varieties: The Gardener's and Farmer's Guide to Plant Breeding and Seed Saving shows the way, and offers an exciting introduction to a whole new gardening adventure.

Available in: Paperback

Read More

Breed Your Own Vegetable Varieties

Carol Deppe

Paperback $29.95