Archive for August, 2007


Live long and ferment!

Thursday, August 30th, 2007

We have news from one of our authors, who recently had a national radio gig on NPR.

In his recent newsletter, Sandor Ellix Katz talks about his experience, and what he’s up to these days.

From Sandor: Greetings from steamy sweaty Tennessee. It is as dry as I’ve ever seen it here, and more than warm enough to make tempeh and koji without contriving conditions for incubation. Between teaching gigs I’ve been helping care for an ill friend, and tending the goats and the gardens.

The teaching I do brings me into contact with many inspirational people and places. No places bring me more pleasure or hope than bountiful farms and gardens. Farmers are my heroes, and we need more of them. If you are not a farmer, at least be an ally to farmers and get to know some and visit their farms and spend some of your money directly with them for the food they produce. Without farmers, there is no food.

I was invited recently to talk about underground food movements on National Public Radio’s Science Friday. The appearance was especially exciting for me because my fellow guests, for a wide-ranging discussion of agricultural policy and grassroots food movements, were Michael Pollan and Marion Nestle, two authors whose work I greatly admire.

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Scientist, Chelsea Green author calls for new 9/11 investigation

Tuesday, August 28th, 2007

Just in time for it’s sixth anniversary, Lynn Margulis—co-author of the forthcoming Dazzle Gradually and author of Luminous Fish—has joined a long line of scientists, thinkers, 9/11 survivors and family members in the United States who question the official story of 9/11. Margulis, Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Geosciences, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, is also calling for a new investigation into the events of the day.

Her complete statement, posted on the website Patriots Question 9/11, reads below the fold:

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15% of US Electricity Supply from $454 billion Iraq War

Friday, August 24th, 2007

Now that President Bush has again exhorted Americans to “stay the course” in Iraq, perhaps it’s a good time to again consider what we could have done with the money spent on waging war in the Middle East had we heeded the Biblical injunction to beat swords into plowshares.

The United States could now be generating from 1% to 15% of its electricity supply if the direct costs of the Iraq war ($454 billion) had been invested instead in wind or solar energy.

Had the United States invested in solar energy instead of war, the country would now be operating 45,000 MW of solar photovoltaics, 20 times that in Germany, the world’s leader.
Similarly, had the United States chosen to install wind turbines instead, the country would be 225,000 MW of wind generating capacity, 20 times that currently installed in the country.

More details on the lost opportunities of the Iraq war can be found here.

— Posted by Paul Gipe, who is the author of Wind Power and Wind Energy Basics

Fox & Friends to feature Mark Schapiro on Toxics in Everyday Products

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2007

Author Mark Schapiro will be on Fox & Friends tomorrow morning at 7:22 AM to talk about his new book, Exposed: The Toxic Chemistry of Everyday Products and What’s at Stake for American Power. With the recent news about toxic substances found in everything from pet food to toys that are being manufactured in China, Mark will focus our attention on how those products have been allowed into the US. Largely, it’s the lack of regulations banning such substances. The good news is that the European Union and many other countries—including China—are banning such substances from these products. The bad news is we aren’t, and that means the US could become the dumping ground for toxic products banned from the shelves of stores in other countries. Sure, we hear ya—it costs too much to make safer products and it would but companies on the block. Not so. Companies are meeting these higher standards in other countries, and still turning a profit. Don’t take our word for it, though, tune in to Fox & Friends in the morning and let Mark give you the goods.

Diane Wilson featured in DiCaprio’s 11th Hour

Tuesday, August 21st, 2007

Diane Wilson, who led the effort to stop to the egregious pollution being dumped into the waters near her Seadrift, Texas home, and which endangered the livelihood of local shrimpers, is one of several dozen leading environmentalists and activists featured in Leonard DiCaprio’s new movie, The 11th Hour. Wilson, whose book Unreasonable Woman documents this fight to save the bay, is also a founder of CODE-PINK.
During her fight with some of the largest multinational companies in the world, she took on about every powerful local, county, state, and federal agency through a mix of hunger strikes, legal action, and other direct action. She encountered scorn, bribery, and death threats in her fight to seek justice and the truth.

DiCaprio’s movie, which is seen as taking over where Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth left off, opened Friday in LA and NYC, with more theaters to be added in the coming weeks.
For more information about the film read these articles:

Don Hazen offers an excellent overview of the film, and its politics on AlterNet.

Kelpie Wilson, of Truthout, also has an interview with Nadia Conners, a co-producer of the film.

What the future holds

Wednesday, August 15th, 2007

Hazel Henderson, author of Ethical Markets, is one of several leading visionaries who were chosen to offer their thoughts on the future as part of Green Money Journal’s fifteenth anniversary issue. She is joined by the likes of Deborah Madison (offering thoughts on the future of food), Amy Domini (offering her perspective on socially-responsible investing), and Woody Tasch on the interesting concept of “slow investing” or “patient capital.”

The future is not as bleak as we may see it, or as a Bread & Puppet performer during the troupe’s Divine Reality Comedy Circus claimed “Everything is not fine, and that is fine.” No, this is not the world through Rove-colored glasses. Rather, each essay provides unique insight into how we need to prepare for the next 15 years, and what we can expect to witness. It’s not all bad, in fact many believe that we are now at the forefront of an emerging economy that will become more humane, not less.

Hazel sees plenty of hope in the future, including a return to multilateralism, increased resource nationalism, a new economy based on clean fuels and energy, and a shift away from taxing income and payroll to instead taxing “waste, pollution, resource depletion, and planned obsolescence.”

However, she sees plenty of challenges to this future model, including “the consequences of money corrupting politics and democracy, the dearth of visionary leadership, global mediocracy and monopoly over the public airwaves.”

Still, Hazel encourages us to remember, “we have all the tools we need to make the transition to global sustainability. The planet is holding up a mirror to humanity and we are slowly learning that our values must change to reflect planetary realities. Stress has always been evolution’s tool. We humans have three main resources to develop ourselves and our societies: information, matter and energy.”

Read her full article here.

Careful what you wish for

Saturday, August 4th, 2007

There is a new campaign aimed at tamping down the GOP-fueled line that the current Democratic-led Congress is “do nothing.” Takes one to know one, we suppose.

In anticipation of this line being fed out through the MSM, The Campaign for America’s Future is posting a new video of Karl Rove as Rovemort (sounds like Voldemort).

It’s funny, and worth viewing but with Democrats willing to offer the President limitless wiretapping capability, we have to be careful of what it is that they are doing in Congress and make sure that they don’t just respond by doing something.


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