Archive for June, 2006


Cranberries and Prom Committees

Friday, June 30th, 2006

They’re all part of a tutorial on single-payer healthcare. I skipped my high school prom to watch the Rocky Horror Picture Show (okay, so really I didn’t have a date and was too chicken to ask anyone out). Even so, I support single payer. I also like cranberry juice. That’s just the way I am.

Our Lord and Treehugging Savior

Thursday, June 29th, 2006

SOJOURNERSmagazine

Hearts & Minds
An Evangelical Climate Change

‘I’m tired of those old white guys telling us what to think and do.’
by Jim Wallis

For more than a decade, a series of environmental initiatives have been coming from an unexpected source—a new generation of young evangelical activists. Mostly under the public radar screen, there were new and creative projects like the Evangelical Environmental Network and Creation Care magazine. In November 2002, one of these initiatives got some national attention—a campaign called “What Would Jesus Drive?” complete with fact sheets, church resources, and bumper stickers.

Recently, more-establishment evangelical groups, particularly the National Association of Evangelicals (NAE), also began to speak up on the issue of “creation care.” Leading the way was NAE Vice President for Governmental Affairs Rich Cizik who, on issues including environmental concern and global poverty reduction, began to sound like a biblical prophet. Cizik and NAE President Ted Haggard, a mega-church pastor in Colorado Springs, were attending critical seminars on the environment, and climate change in particular, and describing their experiences of “epiphany” and “conversion” on the issue. In 2004, the NAE adopted a policy statement “For the Health of the Nation: An Evangelical Call to Civic Responsibility,” which included a principle titled “We labor to protect God’s creation.” In March 2005, Cizik told The New York Times, “I don’t think God is going to ask us how he created the earth, but he will ask us what we did with what he created.”
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Fast reminder

Wednesday, June 28th, 2006

Keep it in mind. http://www.commondreams.org/news2006/0627-04.htm

Carbon in the Courts

Tuesday, June 27th, 2006

Don’t hold your breath (though that would help reduce CO2 output)…

Supreme Court to Hear Bush Environment Case

Monday, June 26, 2006

(06-26) 11:54 PDT WASHINGTON, (AP) –

The Supreme Court agreed Monday to consider whether the Bush administration must regulate carbon dioxide to combat global warming, setting up what could be one of the court’s most important decisions on the environment.

The decision means the court will address whether the administration’s decision to rely on voluntary measures to combat climate change are legal under federal clean air laws.

“This is the whole ball of wax. This will determine whether the Environmental Protection Agency is to regulate greenhouse gases from cars and whether EPA can regulate carbon dioxide from power plants,” said David Bookbinder, an attorney for the Sierra Club.
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P.S. to “Can’t We All Just Get Along“

Tuesday, June 27th, 2006

Take THAT you Newsweek chumps!

The Poetry of a Salt Marsh

Monday, June 26th, 2006

For Immediate Release
June 26, 2006

Sippewissett
Or, Life on a Salt Marsh

By Tim Traver

Contact: Jessica Saturley, (802) 295-6300, ext. 106

Tim Traver’s remarkable book Sippewissett: Or, Life on a Salt Marsh (October 2006) melds together the poetry of our best travel writing with moving memoir and the hard science that has been the author’s obsession since his New England childhood on the shores of Cape Cod. In Sippewissett we find an odd but seductive item: the biography of a salt marsh. Traver expertly interweaves science, history, and memoir creating a rich story grounded in the ebb and flow of the tides, the hatches, the spawning runs, and the challenges of a threatened ecology.Akin to classics like Aldo Leopold’s A Sand County Almanac and Annie Dillard’s Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, Sippewissett eloquently binds ecology and memory, science and art and thus transforms a simple salt marsh into a single living, sentient organism whose past, present and future flow together in the shifting waters and building layers of mud and silt. Traver’s engaging style puts you in the water with the eelgrass, the reader feels the cool mud on a clam hunt.

Travers’s connection to Sippewissett runs deep. His children are the fourth generation to spend summers on this strip of Cape Cod marsh. He introduces us to the people—living and long passed—who shape the marsh and call it home. There is the Oyster Lady who chases an oyster-poaching young Traver off her property, the captain of the Possessor who took his own life as the striped sea bass populations dwindled, the real estate agent who wants to make marsh roads private, and the scientist studying nitrate levels in the mud. Their stories, along with Traver’s own family history, give Sippewissett richness beyond traditional nature writing.

Readers will delight as the story alternates between remembrances of the salt marsh and the history of Sippewissett, a place that has been studied by America’s great biologists, from Louis Agassiz to Rachel Carson. Traver delves into the natural history and science of the place while keeping an eye on the present reality of life on the salt marsh—the struggle between conservation and the ecological fallout from industrial progress.
Tim Traver holds a master’s degree in environmental science from Yale University. He is a freelance travel and science writer and has had a column in the Providence Journal and Falmouth Enterprise. He works on issues of land use, wildlife management, open space protection, and environmental education and is past executive director of the Vermont Institute of Natural Science and the Upper Valley Land Trust and past director of the Norman Bird Sanctuary. Traver lives in Taftsville, Vermont, with his wife and three children.

Available October 2006 | Hardcover | $22.50 | 1-933392-14-2 | 5 5/8 x 8 5/8, 264 pages
For more information, please visit www.chelseagreen.com/2006/items/sippewissett.

(Not necessarily in that order)

Monday, June 26th, 2006

Impeach, Convict, Arrest, & Imprison George W. Bush

[The following op-ed appeared in an edited version as a letter to the editor in the June 25 edition of the Bakersfield Californian.]

It’s imperative that we, the American people, stop George W. Bush from starting another war. This time he has his sights set on Iran and, as in Iraq, the intelligence is being fixed around the policy. Worse, Bush is threatening use of nuclear weapons. Has he gone mad? Will he plunge us into a worldwide nuclear war?

Our course is clear. The House must impeach George W. Bush, and the Senate must convict him for a long list of criminal acts that fall under Article II, Section 4 of the Constitution for “high crimes and misdemeanors”.
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Bush: Sly Dog-in-Chief

Monday, June 26th, 2006

Bush Is Not Incompetent

A BUZZFLASH GUEST CONTRIBUTION
by George Lakoff, Marc Ettlinger and Sam Ferguson

Progressives have fallen into a trap. Emboldened by President Bush’s plummeting approval ratings, progressives increasingly point to Bush’s “failures” and label him and his administration as incompetent. Self-satisfying as this criticism may be, it misses the bigger point. Bush’s disasters — Katrina, the Iraq War, the budget deficit — are not so much a testament to his incompetence or a failure of execution. Rather, they are the natural, even inevitable result of his conservative governing philosophy. It is conservatism itself, carried out according to plan, that is at fault.

[cont'd]

DJ Sleeth

Monday, June 26th, 2006

Rumor has it that Serve God, Save the Planet author J. Matthew Sleeth will be Kojo Nnamdi‘s guest tomorrow sometime between 1pm and 2pm, East Coast time. Yeah, boyeee.

Wassup in energy this weak

Monday, June 26th, 2006

The Progress Report’s review of the annals of Congressional (in)action on energy.


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