Mike Abbott
Mike Abbott spent most of his childhood playing in the woods around his home near Bristol. After graduating with a degree in combined science, he returned to the countryside with a variety of jobs in amenity horticulture. While attending a course in arboriculture in 1976, Mike discovered Herbert Edlin’s inspiring book Woodland Crafts in Britain. From this he made his first pole-lathe and set about rediscovering the skills that had been all but lost. Two years later he undertook a course in recreation management which included a study of the recreational potential of small woodlands. Here he developed the concept of the ‘Living Wood’; no longer just a haunt for pheasants and wildlife but an environment where people could re-establish their contact with the natural world. After two years landscaping in Germany’s Black Forest, Mike returned to work in his home village near Bristol, supervising a youth-training scheme on a woodland restoration project. Here he was able to incorporate his new found love of woodland crafts and could see the fulfilment that this kind of work offered to his trainees. In 1985 he set up Living Wood Training with the aim of teaching green wood skills and promoting their potential. In 1989 he wrote his first book, Green Woodwork, and a year later gathered together a small group of enthusiasts to found the Association of Pole-lathe Turners which grew from a band of six in 1990 to an association of over 500 members within ten years. Over the past two decades, Mike has taught his skills for numerous organisations throughout Britain as well as in the USA, Sweden, Denmark and Finland. In 1993, he was joined in his venture by former green-wood pupil, Tamsin Allum, a talented artist, writer and craftsperson who shares Mike's passion for woodlands. Within a year of being together, they had bought a 10-acre woodland in Herefordshire together with five other people. They subsequently renamed it Clissett Wood after Philip Clissett, a local Victorian chairmaker whose former cottage abuts the wood. For ten years this woodland was the home to Mike’s courses in a workshop that he shared with fellow green woodworker Gudrun Leitz. Mike and Tamsin married in 1996. Since then they have lived in a cottage in East Herefordshire. In their spacious garden, they have built two traditional timber framed workshops with wattle-and-daub walls. Mike runs personal tuition and makes chairs in his workshop, while Tamsin creates stained glass illustrations in hers. As well as producing two delightful children they have also published a book entitled Living Wood - From Buying a Woodland to Making a Chair, written by Mike and illustrated by Tamsin. After 10 years of sharing the woodland workshop at Clissett Wood, Mike decided that he needed more time and space for his courses. Meanwhile Tamsin was developing her business in stained-glass, so in 2005 they sold their shares in Clissett Wood. Since then, Mike has established a new base at Brookhouse Wood which he rents from a tree-loving Farmer, four miles along the lane from their home. Mike has now finally achieved his main ambition; to live and work in the countryside in tune with the seasons. Each spring Mike and a group of volunteers reassemble the workshop structures and add new improvements to the woodland facilities. From May to September he runs his woodland courses with a break in July for a family holiday plus craft fairs and some personal tuition. In autumn he wraps up the workshop again for the winter. In the run up to Christmas he spends most of his time at home catching up on administration while giving Tamsin more time in the studio during her busiest season of the year. From January to March, Mike seizes the opportunity on sunny days, to pay his rent by carrying out woodland management at Brookhouse Wood. Otherwise his winter is split between making chairs, writing, running personal tuition and harvesting enough firewood to provide warmth for the cottage, the workshop and the studio.
Peter Abbs
Peter Abbs is the author of several volumes of poetry including, most recently, Love After Sappho and Selected Poems. He is poetry editor of Resurgence Magazine.
Michael Ableman
Michael Ableman, the cofounder and director of Sole Food Street Farms, is one of the early visionaries of the urban agriculture movement. He has created high-profile urban farms in Watts, California; Goleta, California; and Vancouver, British Columbia. Ableman has also worked on and advised dozens of similar projects throughout North America and the Caribbean, and he is the founder of the nonprofit Center for Urban Agriculture. He is the subject of the award-winning PBS film Beyond Organic narrated by Meryl Streep. His previous books include From the Good Earth, On Good Land, and Fields of Plenty. Ableman lives and farms at the 120-acre Foxglove Farm on Salt Spring Island in British Columbia.
John Abrams
John Abrams is co-founder and president of South Mountain Company, a design/build and renewable energy company on Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts. In 1987, South Mountain Company was restructured to become employee-owned, and so began the adventure that led Abrams to write his first book, The Company We Keep: Reinventing Small Business for People, Community, and Place. With added experience and research, Abrams has revised the book, renamed Companies We Keep: Employee Ownership and the Business of Community and Place, so that it can better serve as a primer for employee-ownership. In 2005 Business Ethics magazine awarded South Mountain its National Award for Workplace Democracy.
Philip Ackerman-Leist
Philip Ackerman-Leist, author of Rebuilding the Foodshed and Up Tunket Road, is a professor at Green Mountain College, where he established the college’s farm and sustainable agriculture curriculum, directs its Farm & Food Project, and founded its Master of Science in Sustainable Food Systems, the nation’s first online graduate program in food systems, featuring applied comparative research of students’ home bioregions. He and his wife, Erin, farmed in the South Tyrol region of the Alps and North Carolina before beginning their nineteen-year homesteading and farming venture in Pawlet, Vermont. With more than two decades of field experience working on farms, in the classroom, and with regional food systems collaborators, Philip’s work is focused on examining and reshaping local and regional food systems from the ground up.
Erin Ackerman-Leist
John Adams
Permaculture magazine has been in print since 1992, during which time John Adams has been writing articles about his various DIY projects. This is a collection of his most popular projects plus a selection of our favorite readers’ DIY submissions.
Vincanne Adams
Vincanne Adams, PhD, is a professor and vice-chair of Medical Anthropology, in the Department of Anthropology, History, and Social Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Adams has previously published six books on the social dynamics of health, scientific knowledge and politics, including most recently, Markets of Sorrow, Labors of Faith: New Orleans in the Wake of Katrina (2013), and Metrics: What Counts in Global Health (2016). She is currently editor for Medical Anthropology Quarterly, the flagship journal for the Society for Medical Anthropology of the American Anthropological Association.
Eli Adler
Robin Alfred
Robin Alfred worked as a trainer, educator and social work manager for fifteen years in London before moving in 1995 to Scotland, where he founded the Findhorn Consultancy Service. Robin is trained in a wide variety of approaches to personal and organizational development, including: Appreciative Inquiry, the Frameworks for Change Coaching Process, Process Work, Spiral Dynamics, and Tools for Corporate Transformation.
Darina Allen
Will Allen
Will Allen is an organic farming visionary. He grew up on a small farm in southern California and served in the US Marine Corps. After receiving a PhD in Anthropology (focusing on Peruvian tropical forest agriculture) he taught at the University of Illinois and UC Santa Barbara before being fired and jailed for civil rights and antiwar activism. In 1972 he returned to farming full-time, and has been farming organically ever since, in Oregon, California, and Vermont, where he now co-manages Cedar Circle Farm. He founded the Sustainable Cotton Project and is a board member of the Organic Consumers Association, Rural Vermont, and co-chair of Farms Not Arms.
Rob Allsop
Gar Alperovitz
Gar Alperovitz, Lionel R. Bauman Professor of Political Economy at the University of Maryland, is cofounder of The Democracy Collaborative. He is a former fellow of the Institute of Politics at Harvard and of King's College at Cambridge University, where he received his PhD in political economy. He has served as a legislative director in the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate, and as a special assistant in the Department of State. Earlier he was president of the Center for Community Economic Development, Codirector of The Cambridge Institute, and president of the Center for the Study of Public Policy. Dr. Alperovitz's numerous articles have appeared in publications ranging from The New York Times and The Washington Post to The Journal of Economic Issues, Foreign Policy, Diplomatic History, and other academic and popular journals. His previous books are America Beyond Capitalism (a new edition of which appeared in 2011), The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb, published in 1995, the 2002 book, Making a Place for Community: Local Democracy in a Global Era (with Thad Williamson and David Imbroscio), and the 2008 book Unjust Deserts (with Lew Daly).
Julia Alvarez
Julia Alvarez has bridged the Americas many times. Born in New York and raised in the Dominican Republic, she is a poet, fiction writer, and essayist, author of world-renowned books in each of the genres, including How the Garc­a Girls Lost Their Accents, In the Time of the Butterflies, and Something to Declare. She is the recipient of a 2013 National Medal of Arts. She lives on a farmstead outside Middlebury, Vermont, with her husband Bill Eichner. Visit Julia's Web site to find out more about her writing. Julia and Bill own an organic coffee farm called Alta Gracia in her native country of the Dominican Republic. Their specialty coffee is grown high in the mountains on what was once depleted pastureland. Not only do they grow coffee at Alta Gracia, but they also work to bring social, environmental, spiritual, and political change for the families who work on their farm. They use the traditional methods of shad-grown coffee farming in order to protect the environment, they pay their farmers a fair and living wage, and they have a school on their farm where children and adults learn to read and write. For more information about Alta Gracia, visit
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
Sheri Amsel
Bruce Anderson
Stuart Anderson
Bonnie Andrich
Bobbi Angell
Judith Anger
Judith Anger is a freelance events promoter in Vienna. In 2011, she started the PermaVitae organization to develop permaculture training.
Michael Antoniou
Michael Antoniou, PhD is a Reader in Molecular Genetics and Head of the Gene Expression and Therapy Group, King’s College London School of Medicine, UK. He has over 30 years’ experience of using genetic engineering in the investigation of gene organization and control, with over 50 peer-reviewed publications, and holds inventor status on gene expression biotechnology patents. His discoveries are being used for the production of research, diagnostic and therapeutic products, and safe and efficacious human somatic gene therapy for genetic disorders.
Mary Appelhof
Mary Appelhof, prepared by master’s degrees in biology and education, spent over 30 years working to develop a system for using redworms to process organic waste.  Recognized as an international authority and lecturer on small-scale vermicomposting she received many honors including a National Science Foundation Grant and the National Recycling Coalition’s Recycler of the Year 2005, Lifetime Achievement. Mary coordinated the highly successful Workshop on the Role of Earthworms in Stabilization of Organic Residues, compiling its proceedings.  She also hosted the Vermillenniumin 2000, which was attended by 129 scientists and worm workers from 19 countries. A former high school biology teacher Mary had the ability to present scientific information in a format easily understood by the layperson.  This is evident in the number of lectures she gave internationally during her lifetime.  Author of Worms Eat My Garbage her self-published book has sold over 200,000 copies and continues to be the handbook on vermicomposting.  Mary, the “Worm Woman of Kalamazoo,” died in 2005.
Aranya has been experimenting with what permaculture can do since his design course epiphany in 1996. In the years that followed he designed a collection of gardens, along with a few other non-land based designs, writing them all up to gain his Diploma in Applied Permaculture Design 2003. Since that time he's followed a teaching pathway, that now involves delivering on average ten two-week design courses a year. Along the way he's met many amazing people that give him hope for the future and who in no small way have influenced the content of this guide. Aranya is also a long-term barefooter, certain that this helps him be more aware of nature, stay grounded and walk lightly on the Earth. He is the author of Permaculture Design: A Step-by-Step Guide.
Paul Armentano
Paul Armentano is the deputy director of NORML (The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws) and the NORML Foundation. A recognized national expert in marijuana policy, health, and pharmacology, he has spoken at dozens of national conferences and legal seminars and has testified before state legislatures and federal agencies. He appears regularly on Drew Pinsky's nationally syndicated radio show, Dr. Drew Live, and his work has appeared in over 500 publications. Armentano is the 2008 recipient of the Project Censored Real News Award for Outstanding Investigative Journalism. He currently lives in California with his wife and son. You can visit the NORML Foundation online at
Jamie Ash
David Asher
David Asher is an organic farmer, goatherd, and farmstead cheesemaker, who lives on the gulf islands of British Columbia.  A guerrilla cheesemaker, Asher explores traditionally cultured, noncorporate methods of cheesemaking. Though mostly self-taught, he picked up his cheese skills from various teachers, including a Brown Swiss cow, named Sundae, on Cortes Island.     Asher’s Black Sheep School of Cheesemaking offers cheesemaking workshops in partnership with food-sovereignty-minded organizations and communities. His workshops teach a cheesemaking method that is natural, DIY, and well suited to any home kitchen. He has been teaching cheesemaking for over seven years.
Suzanne Ashworth
Suzanne Ashworth is an educational administrator living in Sacramento, California, whose spare time and large backyard are completely devoted to gardening. Suzanne has donated the text of Seed to Seed to help support the work of the Seed Savers Exchange, a genetic preservation organization with 8,000 members who are working together to maintain and distribute heirloom varieties of vegetables, fruits, grains, flowers, and herbs.
Dave Asprey
Lionel Astruc
Lionel Astruc has written several books exploring the raw materials sector in France and worldwide, and highlighting the pioneers of the ecological transition. He is also the co-author with Rob Hopkins of The Transition starts here, now and together, published in 2017.
Alan AtKisson
Alan AtKisson, CEO of AtKisson Group and cofounder of the Center for Sustainability Transformation, was inducted into the International Sustainability Hall of Fame in 2013. He has advised governments, cities, and organizations around the world, including Nike, Levi Strauss, Toyota, WWF, and the United Nations Secretariat. His six previous books include the Amazon bestseller Believing Cassandra. He is a dual citizen of the USA and Sweden, and lives in Stockholm.
Claude Aubert
Kenny Ausubel
Kenny Ausubel is an award-winning social entrepreneur, author, journalist and filmmaker. He is co-CEO and cofounder of Bioneers, a nonprofit dedicated to disseminating practical and visionary solutions for restoring Earth's imperiled ecosystems and healing our human communities. Ausubel launched the celebrated annual Bioneers Conference in 1990 with his Bioneers cofounder and wife, Nina Simons, and serves as executive producer of the Bioneers plenary series airing on Free Speech TV and Link TV. He acted as a central advisor to Leonardo DiCaprio's feature documentary The 11th Hour, and appears in the film. He also cofounded Seeds of Change--purveyors of organic, biodiverse heirloom seeds. In addition to Dreaming the Future: Reimagining Civilization in the Age of Nature (2012), Ausubel has written three books--When Healing Becomes a Crime: The Amazing Story of the Hoxsey Cancer Clinics and the Return of Alternative Therapies (2000); The Bioneers: Declarations of Interdependence (1995) and Seeds of Change: The Living Treasure (1994). He also founded and operates Inner Tan Productions, a feature film development company, has written two screenplays, and has also produced several documentary films about alternative medicine. Kenny has served as executive producer and principal writer of the award-winning radio series Bioneers: Revolution from the Heart of Nature, heard in more than 200 communities across the U.S. and Canada, and more globally--reaching 70 million listeners worldwide. He lives in the mountains outside Santa Fe, New Mexico with his wife and their two dogs.