Chelsea Green Publishing

Slow Wine Guide 2017

Pages:256 pages
Size: 5.5 x 9 inch
Publisher:Slow Food Editore
Paperback: 9788884994615
Pub. Date February 07, 2017

Slow Wine Guide 2017

A Year in the Life of Italy’s Vineyards and Wines

Categories:
Food & Drink

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
February 07, 2017

$25.00

336 cellars visited, 2,000 wines reviewed     

An innovative overview of the Italian wine world, which lists the country’s finest bottles in terms of aroma and taste, sense of terroir, and value for the money.

For the sixth consecutive year, Slow Food International offers an English-language edition of its unique guide to Italian wines whose qualities extend well beyond the palate. Drawing upon visits to more than 300 cellars, the 2000 wine reviews in Slow Wine 2017 describe not only what’s in the glass, but also what’s behind it: the work, aims, and passion of producers; their bond with the land; and their choice of cultivation and cellar techniques—favoring the ones who implement ecologically sustainable winegrowing and winemaking practices. An essential guide for wine lovers and armchair oenophiles and better still for those who get out of that chair once in a while: over half the producers listed will offer a discount of at least 10 percent to anyone who visits them with a copy of Slow Wine 2017 in hand.

  

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