Chelsea Green Publishing

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

Pages:96 pages
Book Art:Black and white illustrations
Size: 4.75 x 6.5 inch
Publisher:Chelsea Green Publishing
Paperback: 9781933392752
Pub. Date September 05, 2007

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

An Easy Household Guide

By Nicky Scott
Illustrated by Axel Scheffler

Categories:
Nature & Environment

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
September 05, 2007

$7.95

Answers all of your recycling questions with a complete A-Z listing of everyday household items and how to recycle them. From old cell phones and E-waste to expired medicines and motor oil this little guide shows you where you can send your unwanted items and how you might make a bit of money while you’re at it. Also includes great ideas for reducing consumption and your volume of trash—ideal for businesses and consumers alike!

  • What do you do with your old mobile phone?
  • Where can you take your old car batteries?
  • Which foods are compostable?
  • What happens to the stuff you recycle?

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle is packed with ideas for cutting your consumption and reducing your rubbish. It’s an invaluable guide for anyone who wants to slim their bin and help stop the earth going to waste.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Nicky Scott

Nicky Scott is a former Chairman of the Community Composting Network and is the Coordinator of the Devon Community Composting Network. He has helped in the development of the “Scotty’s Hot Box” and the “RiDan” composter, both now widely used for composting food waste. He is the author of How to Make and Use Compost: The Ultimate Guide, as well as two Chelsea Green Guides about composting and recycling. He lives in England.

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