Chelsea Green Publishing

Judevine, 2nd Edition

Pages:320 pages
Size: 6 x 9 inch
Publisher:Chelsea Green Publishing
Paperback: 9781890132224
Pub. Date January 01, 1999

Judevine, 2nd Edition

Categories:
Nature & Environment

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
January 01, 1999

$25.00

The stage is Judevine, an imaginary town in northern Vermont. This is a small stage, sometimes cold and darkened, but filled with characters so finely etched that they stand out as clearly as steeples against the sky. David Budbill plunges into the soul of New England to find characters and stories with lessons for anyone wanting to find the intrinsic nature of the region that has been called "all of America's backyard." These dark, lyrical, funny narrative poems portray the hopes and joys, pains and despair of people who have been bypassed or bruised by the twentieth century. Budbill has written a song of the down-and-out or overlooked, a song of the unsung. This anthem of the rural renaissance is microcosmic in setting, but universal in scope.

REVIEWS AND PRAISE

"Judevine is an extremely various, wide-ranging collection of stories and memoirs--in effect a novel. With Chekhovian insight, Budbill uncovers, through the American lives of the people of Judevine, the whole extent of his concern for the world, for peace, for love and justice, for understanding. To do so much he must be very resourceful-lyrical, exalted, funny, sometimes mean, always colorful--and he is."--Hayden Carruth

"Unlike ninety-eight percent of living American poets, David Budbill has a subject. Judevine is full of loving interest in other people and in what I still insist on calling the real world. Budbill both informs and moves and he is, in short, a delight and a comfort."--Wendell Berry

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

David Budbill

David Budbill is the author of six books of poems, eight plays, a children's book, and two works of fiction for young adults. He received a Guggenheim Fellowship in poetry and a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship in play writing. His play, Judevine, has been produced in twenty-six states. His most recent book of poems is Moment to Moment: Poems of a Mountain Recluse, forthcoming in 1999 from Cooper Canyon Press. He was born in Cleveland, Ohio, but has lived for several decades in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont. For more information on Budbill and his work, please visit www.davidbudbill.com.

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