Chelsea Green Publishing

Eager

Pages:312 pages
Book Art:Black-and-white illustrations throughout, 8-page color insert
Size: 6 x 9 inch
Publisher:Chelsea Green Publishing
Hardcover: 9781603587396
Pub. Date July 11, 2018

Eager

The Surprising, Secret Life of Beavers and Why They Matter

Categories:
Nature & Environment

Availability: Available for Pre Order

Hardcover

Available Date:
June 27, 2018

$24.95

In Eager, environmental journalist Ben Goldfarb reveals that our modern idea of what a healthy landscape looks like and how it functions is wrong, distorted by the fur trade that once trapped out millions of beavers from North America’s lakes and rivers. The consequences of losing beavers were profound: streams eroded, wetlands dried up, and species from salmon to swans lost vital habitat. Today, a growing coalition of “Beaver Believers”—including scientists, ranchers, and passionate citizens—recognizes that ecosystems with beavers are far healthier, for humans and non-humans alike, than those without them. From the Nevada deserts to the Scottish highlands, Believers are now hard at work restoring these industrious rodents to their former haunts. Eager is a powerful story about one of the world’s most influential species, how North America was colonized, how our landscapes have changed over the centuries, and how beavers can help us fight drought, flooding, wildfire, extinction, and the ravages of climate change. Ultimately, it’s about how we can learn to coexist, harmoniously and even beneficially, with our fellow travelers on this planet.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ben Goldfarb

Ben Goldfarb is an award-winning environmental journalist who covers wildlife conservation, marine science, and public lands management, as well as an accomplished fiction writer. His work has been featured in ScienceMother JonesThe Guardian, High Country NewsVICEAudubon MagazineModern FarmerOrionWorld Wildlife MagazineScientific AmericanYale Environment 360, and many other publications. He currently lives in New Haven, Connecticut.

AUTHOR VIDEOS

Solutions Journalism Network - Ben Goldfarb

Journalist Ben Goldfarb discusses his reporting project on the Yukon to Yellowstone landscape connectivity initiative.

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