Chelsea Green Publishing

Resilience, Community Action & Societal Transformation

Pages:216 pages
Book Art:Full-color photographs throughout
Size: 6.7 x 8.85 inch
Publisher:Permanent Publications
Paperback: 9781856232975
Pub. Date June 21, 2017

Resilience, Community Action & Societal Transformation

People, Place, Practice, Power, Politics & Possibility in Transition

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
June 21, 2017

$24.95

Resilience, Community Action and Societal Transformation is a unique collection bridging research, theory and practical action to create more resilient societies. It includes accounts from people and organizations on the front line of efforts to build community resilience; cutting-edge theory and analysis from engaged scholar-activists; and commentary from sympathetic researchers. Its content ranges from first-hand accounts of the Transition Movement in the UK, Canada and Spain, to theoretical reflections on resilience theory and the shifts in mindsets and perspectives required for transitions to sustainability.

The book contains substantive contributions from activists and activist-scholars such as Lorenzo Chelleri (Gran Sasso Science Institute, Italy), Juan del Rio (Transition Spain), Naresh Giangrande (Transition Network), Maja Göpel (Wuppertal Institute), Thomas Henfrey (Transition Research Network), Justin Kenrick (Forest People’s Programme), Glen Kuecker (University of Indiana), Cheryl Lyon (Transition Peterborough Ontario) and Gesa Maschowski (Transition Bonn), along with briefing notes from noted experts in resilience. The result is a compelling cocktail of insights, ideas and action points likely to define the scientific and practical fields of community resilience for years to come.

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