Chelsea Green Publishing

The Moneyless Manifesto

Pages:352 pages
Size: 6 x 9 inch
Publisher:Permanent Publications
Paperback: 9781856231015
Pub. Date August 15, 2013

The Moneyless Manifesto

Live Well, Live Rich, Live Free

By Mark Boyle
Foreword by Charles Eisenstein

Availability: In Stock

Paperback

Available Date:
August 15, 2013

$24.95

That we need money to live, like it or not, is a self-evident truism. Right? Not anymore. Drawing on almost three years of experience as The Moneyless Man, exbusinessman Mark Boyle not only demystifies money and the system that binds us to it, he also explains how liberating, easy, and enjoyable it is to live with less of it.

In The Moneyless Manifesto, Mark takes us on an exploration that goes deeper into the thinking that pushed him to make the decision to go moneyless, and the philosophy he developed along the way.

Bursting with radical new perspectives on some of the vital, yet often unquestioned, pillars of economic theory and what it really means to be “sustainable,” as well as creative and practical solutions for how we can live more with less, Mark offers us one of the world’s most thought-provoking voices on economic and ecological ideas.

Mark’s original, witty style will help simplify and diversify your personal economy, freeing you from the invisible ties that limit you, and making you more resilient to financial shocks. The Moneyless Manifesto will enable you to start your journey into a new world.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Mark Boyle

Mark Boyle became The Moneyless Man in November 2008 when he set out to try living completely without money for twelve months—not spending, earning, saving, or using it. His first book, The Moneyless Man: A Year of Freeconomic Living, was published in June 2010 by Oneworld Publications and documents this journey. Having successfully completed the first year of moneyless living, Mark continued to live moneylessly for almost three years.

Mark is the founder of the Freeconomy movement—which puts people with skills, tools, and time in touch with those with a need for these things, without money changing hands—and blogs at www.justfortheloveofit.org.

As a companion to The Moneyless Manifesto, Mark and others have set up www.moneylessmanifesto.org in order to encourage readers to share their experiences about moneyless living, or moving away from dependence on current cultures around modern economy.

CONNECT WITH THIS AUTHOR

The Moneyless Manifesto's Website

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