Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

Wild Flavors is an IACP Finalist!

Congratulations are in order for Didi Emmons, author of Wild Flavors: One Chef’s Transformative Year Cooking from Eva’s Farm.

Last Thursday, Feburary 16th, finalists for this year’s International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) cookbook awards were announced, and Wild Flavors is a finalist in the Food Matters category!

Considered the gold standard among cookbook awards and widely lauded as the most selective in the industry, IACP has been presenting its cookbook awards for more than 25 years to promote quality and creativity in culinary writing and publishing, and to expand the public’s awareness of culinary literature. Winners will be announced on April 2.

What are readers saying about this fun and unique cookbook? Here’s a recent customer review:

“This is an incredible must-have book for anyone out there who likes to know where their food comes from and enjoys exploring new flavors in their kitchen. Recipes aside for a moment, the book itself is beautiful. The pictures pull you into the lush verdant world that is Eva’s Garden, and I have spent hours reading through the charming, funny, and poignant vignettes, stories, and lessons that give the reader a glimpse into the quirky but purposeful life of Eva Sommaripa. …If you are intimidated by fresh herbs (I was), this book will change your life — Emmons writes about each ingredient as she would an old friend, giving unfamiliar herbs like Chervil or African Basil context and personality that will help ease your anxieties. …This is my new favorite book and I would recommend it to anyone interested in food, farming, or the environment!” –BookWorm

Check it out for yourself, and stay tuned to hear about the IACP award! We’ll be waiting impatiently by the inbox to hear the results on April 2!


The Etymology of Stock and Broth

Question: When you make soup, do you start with stock or broth? Answer: It depends. Rachael Mamane answers that question and others in Mastering Stocks and Broths, the definitive and most comprehensive guide on stocks, broths, and how to prepare and use them. As a special treat to celebrate the book launch, we’ve got an excerpt […] Read More

How well do you know your charcuterie?

Prosciutto. Andouille. Country ham. The extraordinary rise in popularity of cured meats in recent years often overlooks the fact that the ancient practice of meat preservation through the use of salt, time, and smoke began as a survival technique. All over the world, various cultures developed ways to extend the viability of the hunt—and later […] Read More

4 Books for Growing Food in Winter

Don’t let cold weather stop you from producing and enjoying your own food. For many, the coming of winter simply means cultivation moves indoors or under cover. Small farmers, homesteaders, home gardeners, and commercial growers can extend the growing season with techniques outlined in these essential books. There’s no need for urbanites and small-space dwellers […] Read More

Is My Broth (or Stock) Bad?

Are you planning to start the GAPS diet or any other diet aimed at boosting gut health this year? If so, chances are that stocks and broths are critical components. Even if you’re not changing the way you eat, but you often have pots of aromatic goodness bubbling on your stove, you may have wondered, […] Read More

A Simple Way to Grow Fresh Greens Indoors This Winter

Just because the temperatures have started to drop doesn’t mean you have to live without fresh greens until Spring. Author and gardener Peter Burke’s innovative method of growing soil sprouts indoors can help you grow nutrient-dense greens all year long at a fraction of the cost of buying at market. Burke’s book, Year-Round Indoor Salad Gardening, is […] Read More
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