Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

What the future holds

Hazel Henderson, author of Ethical Markets, is one of several leading visionaries who were chosen to offer their thoughts on the future as part of Green Money Journal’s fifteenth anniversary issue. She is joined by the likes of Deborah Madison (offering thoughts on the future of food), Amy Domini (offering her perspective on socially-responsible investing), and Woody Tasch on the interesting concept of “slow investing” or “patient capital.”

The future is not as bleak as we may see it, or as a Bread & Puppet performer during the troupe’s Divine Reality Comedy Circus claimed “Everything is not fine, and that is fine.” No, this is not the world through Rove-colored glasses. Rather, each essay provides unique insight into how we need to prepare for the next 15 years, and what we can expect to witness. It’s not all bad, in fact many believe that we are now at the forefront of an emerging economy that will become more humane, not less.

Hazel sees plenty of hope in the future, including a return to multilateralism, increased resource nationalism, a new economy based on clean fuels and energy, and a shift away from taxing income and payroll to instead taxing “waste, pollution, resource depletion, and planned obsolescence.”

However, she sees plenty of challenges to this future model, including “the consequences of money corrupting politics and democracy, the dearth of visionary leadership, global mediocracy and monopoly over the public airwaves.”

Still, Hazel encourages us to remember, “we have all the tools we need to make the transition to global sustainability. The planet is holding up a mirror to humanity and we are slowly learning that our values must change to reflect planetary realities. Stress has always been evolution’s tool. We humans have three main resources to develop ourselves and our societies: information, matter and energy.”

Read her full article here.


Q&A with Kate Raworth about her radical new book, DOUGHNUT ECONOMICS

Q: First things first: Why did you want to write this book? A: I studied economics at university 25 years ago because I wanted to make a difference in the world and believed that economics – the mother tongue of public policy – would best equip me to do that. Instead, its theories left me […] Read More

Slack and Taut: Defining a System’s Resilience

A resilient future (or a resilient present, for that matter) needs to be slack, not taut. What do we mean? Core to the concept of a Lean Economy is understanding the need to move toward a “slack” market rather than one that is “taut.” When British economist David Fleming died unexpectedly in 2010, he left […] Read More

Prehistory of the Next American Revolution

What now? A new Revolution? If we are to counter the dangers both of corporate domination and of traditional forms of socialist statism, decentralization is essential—both of economic institutions and of political structure. We are at a point in our nation’s history that could, decades from now, be taught as the prehistory of the next […] Read More

The Seven-Point Protocol for a Lean Economy

In the future, what will our local economies look like? How will they function if there is little, to no, state or national support? The late David Fleming envisioned a post-capitalistic society that we could call “deep local” — in which all needs are met at the local level — from income to social capital […] Read More

The Six Vital Capitals of the Future

There is an increasing demand on businesses and governments to evaluate their impacts on multiple forms of capital – natural, social, and economic— and this book explains how they can make it happen. The MultiCapital Scorecard’s open-source methodology has been endorsed by the United Nations Environment Program, and it has been shown to help public […] Read More
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