Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

WATCH: Learn How to Cut Up a Chicken. From a Salatin.

It’s barbecue season! When all your friends gather round, sip on cool beverages, and shoot the breeze. It is, in other words, the perfect time to showcase skills at the grill. And if you’re choosing to grill meat this summer, instead of a veggie burger, then you might be faced with a bit of a dilemma. Do you spend the extra buck or two on free-range, grass-fed, or otherwise organically raised meat? Or save your money in support of your savings, buy the cheap brand, and in so doing support industrialized food raised in feedlots? I know, money’s tighter than usual these days. But if you go with the former, you’ll save money on healthcare in the end. Because while industrial feedlot meat may be cheaper, it’s really bad for you. Okay, okay. barbecue season is supposed to be fun. I’m not trying to be a buzz kill, but having fun doesn’t have to mean forgetting that the choices we make when it comes to food are political.

Two more things. One: Joel Salatin‘s Polyface Farm—one of the most influential places in the U.S., and featured in The Omnivore’s Dilemma and the new film Food, Inc.—has become a key player in the food movement; his farming methods have caught the attention of media nationwide. Two: If you’re a meat-eater, it’s a good thing to know how-to cut up a whole chicken, especially if you’re raising your own. So with these two points in mind, I ask you: is there a better way to learn how to cut up a chicken than from the man who revolutionized the way chickens were raised?

Revolutionize your barbecue season by getting to know more about your food. Start by watching this video of Joel Salatin’s son, Daniel, who helps him run Polyface Farm (and no doubt learned everything from his dad). Daniel will walk you through the process of cutting up a whole chicken. Free lesson!

Watch Now


The Etymology of Stock and Broth

Question: When you make soup, do you start with stock or broth? Answer: It depends. Rachael Mamane answers that question and others in Mastering Stocks and Broths, the definitive and most comprehensive guide on stocks, broths, and how to prepare and use them. As a special treat to celebrate the book launch, we’ve got an excerpt […] Read More

How well do you know your charcuterie?

Prosciutto. Andouille. Country ham. The extraordinary rise in popularity of cured meats in recent years often overlooks the fact that the ancient practice of meat preservation through the use of salt, time, and smoke began as a survival technique. All over the world, various cultures developed ways to extend the viability of the hunt—and later […] Read More

Chelsea Green Weekly for May 5, 2017

Ever wonder what your favorite Chelsea Green authors do between writing groundbreaking–both literally and figuratively–books? Here are the best links and resources for your weekend reading pleasure. Let’s start with The Alzheimer’s Antidote. The Alzheimer’s Antidote Amy Berger has been making the rounds on the health, wellness, and fitness circuit, explaining the theories behind her revolutionary […] Read More

Learn from Chelsea Green authors this summer at Sterling College

Each summer, the School of the New American Farmstead at Sterling College in Vermont offers continuing education designed specifically for “agrarians, culinarians, entrepreneurs, and lifelong learners.” Chelsea Green is proud to partner with this program so you can learn from our expert authors in a hands-on, experiential setting at Sterling’s farm and teaching kitchen. Be sure to read […] Read More

4 Books for Growing Food in Winter

Don’t let cold weather stop you from producing and enjoying your own food. For many, the coming of winter simply means cultivation moves indoors or under cover. Small farmers, homesteaders, home gardeners, and commercial growers can extend the growing season with techniques outlined in these essential books. There’s no need for urbanites and small-space dwellers […] Read More
+1
Tweet
Share
Share
Pin