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Chelsea Green Blog

Sexy Food: Meet Joel Salatin

This is reposted from The Seattleite’s Linda Miller Nicholson, a self-described “Stiletto Ninja turned Foodie Fashionista”. I guess that explains the blatant objectification of poor old Joel Salatin…visit the original post to comment.

Spend time with a hunk, learn about farming and get healthy — all in a day’s work.

With dust on his boots and suspenders hugging his abs just tightly enough to reveal their muscled tone, Joel Salatin is the embodiment of the Hot Farmer.

His hotness is magnified by all the work he’s done to promote sustainable farming practices in a culture that often fights him tooth and nail. More than that, he’s a winsome Virginia boy with a heart of gold and smiling eyes. You can get up close and personal with him on Saturday, July 23, at the Kirkland Health Fair.

When he’s not busy spreading the word about how to raise cows, pigs, chicken and carrots in more humane and eco-friendly ways, he’s at home on the third-generation, family-run Polyface Farms — an iconic establishment in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley. Polyface catapulted to international fame as the grass farm featured on the pages of The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan, as well as the Oscar-nominated film Food, Inc. Salatin is much more than just the pretty face behind the farm, however.

Overall, he’s penned six books — and his latest, The Sheer Ecstasy of Being a Lunatic Farmer, details his unconventional approach to agriculture. Though he is often perceived as crazy by big, bad cattle men, Salatin’s ideas might just save the future of the farming and ranching industries. “Long after the ecological adulterers and prostitutes have run their course,” he writes, “earthworms will still want organic matter to eat and will still create fertile soil out of poverty.”

His zeal for making the world a better place is as infectious in person as it is on paper. Even when you close your eyes, you can tell he is smiling through his words.

Read the original article here. And check out Linda’s blog, Salty Seattle for more of her hilarious softcore foodie-rotica.

Check out Salatin’s latest creation, The Sheer Ecstasy of Being a Lunatic Farmer here.


The Etymology of Stock and Broth

Question: When you make soup, do you start with stock or broth? Answer: It depends. Rachael Mamane answers that question and others in Mastering Stocks and Broths, the definitive and most comprehensive guide on stocks, broths, and how to prepare and use them. As a special treat to celebrate the book launch, we’ve got an excerpt […] Read More

How well do you know your charcuterie?

Prosciutto. Andouille. Country ham. The extraordinary rise in popularity of cured meats in recent years often overlooks the fact that the ancient practice of meat preservation through the use of salt, time, and smoke began as a survival technique. All over the world, various cultures developed ways to extend the viability of the hunt—and later […] Read More

4 Books for Growing Food in Winter

Don’t let cold weather stop you from producing and enjoying your own food. For many, the coming of winter simply means cultivation moves indoors or under cover. Small farmers, homesteaders, home gardeners, and commercial growers can extend the growing season with techniques outlined in these essential books. There’s no need for urbanites and small-space dwellers […] Read More

Is My Broth (or Stock) Bad?

Are you planning to start the GAPS diet or any other diet aimed at boosting gut health this year? If so, chances are that stocks and broths are critical components. Even if you’re not changing the way you eat, but you often have pots of aromatic goodness bubbling on your stove, you may have wondered, […] Read More

A Simple Way to Grow Fresh Greens Indoors This Winter

Just because the temperatures have started to drop doesn’t mean you have to live without fresh greens until Spring. Author and gardener Peter Burke’s innovative method of growing soil sprouts indoors can help you grow nutrient-dense greens all year long at a fraction of the cost of buying at market. Burke’s book, Year-Round Indoor Salad Gardening, is […] Read More
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