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Roundup—the American Weed-Killer—Is Likely Killing American People, Too

Monsanto, Monsanto, Monsanto. Is it simply a scary coincidence that nearly every time bad news hits, they’re involved? (Hint: No.) This time, new research has intensified the debate that Roundup, the popular weed killer created by Monsanto, also kills human cells. The research posits that the inert ingredients in Roundup, or inactive ones, are not quite so inactive. And by that I mean they may be deadly to human embryonic, placental and umbilical cord cells.

Those are cells we use to make babies, ya’ll.

According to Environmental Health News:

Used in yards, farms and parks throughout the world, Roundup has long been a top-selling weed killer. But now researchers have found that one of Roundup’s inert ingredients can kill human cells, particularly embryonic, placental and umbilical cord cells. The new findings intensify a debate about so-called “inerts” — the solvents, preservatives, surfactants and other substances that manufacturers add to pesticides. Nearly 4,000 inert ingredients are approved for use by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. […]

The research team suspects that Roundup might cause pregnancy problems by interfering with hormone production, possibly leading to abnormal fetal development, low birth weights or miscarriages. […]

Until now, most health studies have focused on the safety of glyphosate, rather than the mixture of ingredients found in Roundup. But in the new study, scientists found that Roundup’s inert ingredients amplified the toxic effect on human cells—even at concentrations much more diluted than those used on farms and lawns.

One specific inert ingredient, polyethoxylated tallowamine, or POEA, was more deadly to human embryonic, placental and umbilical cord cells than the herbicide itself — a finding the researchers call “astonishing.”

“This clearly confirms that the [inert ingredients] in Roundup formulations are not inert,” wrote the study authors from France’s University of Caen. “Moreover, the proprietary mixtures available on the market could cause cell damage and even death [at the] residual levels” found on Roundup-treated crops, such as soybeans, alfalfa and corn, or lawns and gardens.

Think about it: Roundup has been around since the early 1970s. And if 100 million pounds of Roundup are used per year, that’s about forty billion pounds of Roundup we’ve been exposed to since its inception. And if you didn’t know this, prepare to cry. Monsanto is not only the world’s leading producer of weed-killer that also kills human cells—they’re also the leading producer of genetically engineered seeds (GMOs), which means somewhere between 70 and 100 percent market share for a variety of crops—namely corn and soy—which makes up the diet of factory-farmed cows and chickens, which are then eaten by humans.

Read the entire article here, on Environmental Health news.


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