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Our Chemical Diet

The ContraCostaTimes is running a story by Steve Butler about the chemical content in our foods. He argues that the antibiotics in our meat and diary, the pesticides on our vegetables, and our growing resistance to conventional medical treatments may be linked. Is an epidemic next?

Will Allen, author of The War on Bugs, makes a similar argument in his book. Eating locally produced, organic food, is the only way to eat sustainably—for your health, the environment, and the economy.

From the article:

How can we expect to live long enough to enjoy a hard-earned retirement if the food industry is trying to kill us? A friend who just returned from Scotland said that his cattle-farming host had pointed out that antibiotics in cattle were banned in Britain 14 years ago. Meanwhile in South Korea, people are rioting as the country lifts the ban on U.S. beef. What do they know? Are we like sheep to some slaughter?

The story with the meat processing industry is that it has been dramatically consolidated from lots of small farms into giant industrial complexes that grow cattle and hogs as fast as possible. Massive doses of antibiotics are the only hope for keeping these animals alive long enough to slaughter.

And then there are those “free-range” chickens. Apparently, to earn this designation for its fowl, a chicken processor has only to make available an open fenced-in area at the end of a large chicken “coop.” Unfortunately, for those of us who would like to think we are eating chickens that got a lot of fresh air and sunshine in place of antibiotics, the chickens tend not to want to go outside. They like to hang out with a few thousand of their friends — inside.Let’s start connecting the dots. Today, in hospitals across the country, staff infections resistant to antibiotics seem to be an epidemic. It’s a safe guess that all the antibiotics in meat may have contributed to our resistance to antibiotics.

Read the full article here.


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