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Small Is the New Big Thing

A large charge. A whopper. Big Sky Country. Big Oil. Walking Tall. The Great Plains. Great Caesar’s Ghost. Bring out the big guns. For better or worse, hugeness has always been a big (get it?) part of the American spirit. I suppose it has something to do with the spirit in which the pioneers had…

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They Don’t Make Pyramids Like They Used To

Whenever I see or hear the term “food pyramid,” I imagine a bunch of sandblasted archaeologists opening up an ancient sarcophagus, and discovering a stash of Doritos that’s been buried and forgotten for three thousand years. Thanks to sodium benzoate and BHT, they haven’t changed a bit. They’re perfectly edible. Somebody in khaki shorts sends…

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Yes, We Have Bananas, But …

Nationwide, the market for organic foods has soared from $3.57 billion in 1997 to $10.38 billion in 2003, according to the Organic Trade Association. The group predicts sales will reach $14.5 billion by the end of 2005 as Americans buy everything from radishes to beef grown without conventional pesticides and fertilizers, biotechnology, antibiotics or growth…

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Vote With Your Dollars! Stop Feeding the Corporate Beast!

John K. Wilson is coordinator of the Independent Press Association’s Campus Journalism Project and founder of the Indy, online at www.indy.pabn.org. Wilson interviewed various media critics for a report to be distributed at the Free Press-organized National Conference on Media Reform in St. Louis, Missouri, later this week (May 12-15). What follows is Wilson’s email…

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Politics is Perception: The Myth of the Liberal Media

Welcome to the post-factual age, a time when politics and government have abandoned any allegiance it once had with policies and positions supported by facts for a free-for-all of misleading images and ingenuous values that cloak an ugly truth. Today, politics has foresaken reason and become a game of perception. Facts have become irrelevant to…

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Pinhook Swamp: A Diamond of the Rough

The rediscovery in Arkansas a couple of weeks ago of the ivory-billed woodpecker, thought to have been extinct for more than 60 years, has renewed public interest in the protection of land that, at a cursory glance, may be unglamorous but is essential habitat to threatened species…

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Take the Country and Run

“All great truths begin as heresies.” — George Bernard Shaw As you explore Chelsea Green’s Web site, familiarizing yourself with the company’s mission and buying its books (you are, right?), perhaps you find yourself wondering if “the politics and practice of sustainable living” is truly a realistic goal under a pathologically secretive federal government that…

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Social Security Reform: Why Bush Can’t Win This One

George W. Bush is convinced America’s Social Security system is in trouble, and he’s banking his reputation on being able to convince the rest of us, cross-crossing the Nation (at taxpayer expense) on a public relations campaign that would make your head spin. But can the President win this battle? No. He doesn’t stand a…

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Bush Declares War on Ivory-Billed Woodpecker

Five days after sightings in Arkansas of the ivory-billed woodpecker, a species long believed to be extinct, were confirmed, the Bush administration has placed a bounty on the elusive creature’s head, offering a reward of $10,000 to anyone who can bring in an ivory-billed woodpecker in its postmortem state.

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Learning Curve: Memoirs of a Dumb Kid

I grew up in Chicago, and the elementary school I attended had a tradition of packing its sixth-graders off each spring for a week at a camp in rural Indiana, to introduce them to nuts and berries and stuff.

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